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April 06, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUURSIDAY, APRIL 6, 1967

THE MICHIGA I! DAILY

THURDAYAPRL 6,967 HE ICHIA N AIL

PAGE SEVEN

Hawks,
By The Associated Press
CHICAGO ' Coach Billy Reay
expects his Chicago Black Hawks
to win the Stanley Cup but he
also looks for a tough series
against the Toronto Maple Leafs.
The Hawks, champions of the
National Hockey League, and the
third place Leafs open their best-
of-seven semifinal series in Chi-
cago Stadium tonight.
"It'll be a tough series," said
Reay. "They're going to hit hard,
check hard, grab hard, pull and
play it close all the way. But
we're prepared for them."
Despite the rugged game tactics
usually employed by the Maple
Leafs, the Hawks will go into the
series as heavy favorites. In addi-
tion to winning the championship,
the Hawks will have an edge in
home ice if the series should go
seven games.
During the regular season the
Hawks thoroughly outclassed the
Maple Leafs. Chicago had a rec-
ord of eight victories, four defeats
and two ties. The Hawks also
outscored the Leafs 66-57 in the
14 games.
Chances are the starting goalies
will be Glenn Hall for the Hawks
and Terry Sawchuk for the Leafs,
Hall has been given a thorough
rest since he sat out the last five
games of the regular season. The
Leafs' net minding job ordinarily
would have gone to ageless
Johnny Bower. But he suffered a
split finger on his right hand dur-
Pistons Gain
Two Honors
The Detroit Pistons, last place
finishers in the NBA's Western
Division, were blessed with good
news on two fronts yesterday.
Prize first year man Dave Bing
was a runaway choice as the NBA's
Rookie of the Year. Bing, a 6'3"
guard, was the fifth highest scor-
ing rookie in the league's history.
The Syracuse All-America aver-
aged 20 points a game for the
cellar,;dwellers.
The other happy note for the
Pistons concerned the coin flip
for the first draft choice. This
year they won. The Baltimore
Bullets called heads, the coin
came up tails, and the Pistons will
A select first in the May 3 run for
college talent.
Ironically, the Detroit team lost
the flip last year and had to settle
for Bing as their number one
choice-instead of Cazzie Russell.

Canadiens
ing practice at Peterborough, On- - -
tario, yesterday.I
The Hawks, however, have a
question mark and it could be a NI I c
big one. Bobby Hull missed the
last three games of the season be- By Th
cause of an injured left knee. ByUTA
The Golden Jet, who scored 52' is edgy as
goals in the campaign, tested his Palmer has
knee in workouts Tuesday and jce hflowi
yesterday and said, "It feels okay juices wom
but I haven't been hit yet." 31st Maste
* * *starting todi
MONTREAL - The Montreal Eighty-thi
Canadiens are favored to win shotmakers,
their Stanley Cup semifinal play- start teeing
off series against the New York over the flow
Rangers. The series opens tonight Augusta Nat
in Montreal!. question pa
The Canadiens are naturals for "Who's go
the favorite role. They are the two?"
reigning champs, and they are Between t
seeking their third Stanley Cup long-driving
in a row. colorful, con
But don't count the Rangers won seven o
out yet. They pulled two surprises ters, the las
out of their hats to dog the Jack is defe
league's leaders most of the sea- recordholder
son, only to fall apart at the a row, andA
finish of a three-way fight for who has wo
second place. Young Rod Gilbert Rated ci
and ageless'Bernie (Boom Boom) these co-fav
Geffrion sparked the Blues the champion Bi
first half of the season and goalie Doug Sande
Ed Giacomin carried them the Brewer, Juli
second half. B Dt, i

Favored in

NHL Playoffs

Come to

klaus, Palmer Again Masters Choices

COLLEGE LIFE
Speaker: GORDON WALKER
Director of Campus Crusade at Ohio State
Friday, April 7-730 P*M
Alpha Omega Pi Sorority-800 Oxford Rd.

i

e Associated Press
A, Ga.-Jack Nicklaus
a wet rooster, Arnold
his fabled charger
ng again and they're
n on the spot in the
rs golf tournament,
ay.
ree of the world's best
pro and amateur;
off at 10 a.m. EST
veering but formidable
ional course, with one
ramount:
oing to crack the big
hem, the 27-year-old,
Nicklaus and the
mbative Palmer have
of the last nine Mas-
st five in a row. Big
ending champion and
, seeking his third in
Arnie is the only man
n four.
hief threats behind
vorites are U.S. Open
ill Casper, flamboyant
rs, Gary Player, Gay
us Boros, Bob Goalby,
n and Phil Rodgers.
ervers think thismay
for Casper, the slim-
Mormon who came
shots back to tie Pal-

mer and then later win the 1966
National Open. Casper, immod-
estly, has joined the club.
"This is not a closed corpora-
tion," the quiet-spoken Casper
said. "Anybody who can putt can
win here, and I am putting better
than I have in years. I like my
chances."
Sanders, who has the shortest
and quickest swing in big time
golf, labelled his game "short and
crocked" but he has been one of
the hotest commodities on the
winter and spring tours.
He has one arawback. He may
be over-matched by the 6,980-
yard, par 72 Augusta course, term-
ed the hitter's course.
Player, the dogged little South
Africanrwho won here in 1961.
says he is playing "quite nicely
but not great. I don't have quite
the same desire any more," he
added.
The 47-year-old Boros, two-
time National Open champion and
off to his best spring start in his
18 years as a pro, is calmly con-
fident, "I could be putting better
maybe, but I'm happy with my
game," he said.
Brewer, who spewed out 29
birdies at Pensacola two weeks
ago and who still smarts under

the embarrassment of the three- two weeks ago and to driving
putt 72nd green that cost him the problems most of the year, has
Masters title a year ago, is ap- seldom been more on edge. His
parently at the top of his game. nerves are like guitar Strings.
"I want the Masters-I think I On the other hand, Palmer,
can win it," he said determinedly, winner of two tournaments so far
Devlin, the Australian, has the this year, close in two others and
game for the Augusta course-long leading money winner with $49,-
off the tee and solid on the greens 650. appears to be like the Palmer
-but he is hobbling around on of old-loose, enthusiastic, and
blistered feet. brimming with confidence.

There are several other cripples
in the blue ribbon field. Tower-
ing George Archer, winner at
Greensboro last weekend, has an
infected toe-nail on his left foot
which affects his stance and
swing. The immortal Ben Hogan,
54 but still a sentimental favorite,
is bothered with a shoulder ail-
ment. Tommy Bolt has a bad back
and Harold Henning of South
Africa has been off the tour be-
cause he pulled a couple of ribs
at Tucson.
Nicklaus, exposed to the mumps

"I'm pretty satisfied with my
game," he said. "I really get
charged up around here."
The field includes 51 U.S. pro-
fessionals, 10 U.S. senators, 18
foreign pros and four foreign
amateurs.
Other leading pro threats in-
clude Britain's Peter Allis, Peter
Butler and Dave Thomas: Kel
Nagle of Australia: George Knud-
son of Canada, Roberto de Vi-
cenzo of Argentina and Chen
Ching-Po, the Nationalist Chinese
pro now living in Tokyo.

F~ ~
Sf1 DENTSa
Tansportation Specil s
With
]ECONO-ICAlI
438 W. Huron 663-2033
Special rates for students 19 & older
THE WISDOM TOOTH
Plum Street Coffeehouse-Detroit
FRIDAY AND SATURDAY
Joe Fineman and the
DIXBORO COUNTY BRAKEMAN
(bluegrass band)
LAURA McM ULLEN
U. of M. Folksinger)
Also-AN OLDTYME MOVIE-First Show 9:15 P.M.
JAZZ 'TIL DAWN - 2:30 A.M.-6 A.M.

P

Some observers are betting that
the Rangers can pull out some
more surprises and give the
Canadiens a hot series.

ru ce Levilil
Many obse
be the year
med-down
from sevenI

XAVIER NICHOLAS
exciting young poet from Tuskegee

I

""'---

.1

Institute

discusses

"A Poet's Eye

MICH IGAN ENSIAN
This week and next

View of Modern Poetry."'
at the Ark tonight

1421 Hill St.

9:00 P.M.

SALES
IN
FISHBOWL

Distribution 10-4
Student Publications
420 Maynard St.

_ _ _,

I

THE PROFESSIONAL ENGINEER

I.

Presented by Engineering Council
SPEAKERS

-

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At corner of Ashley St. & Miller St.
668-9829
Featuring:
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" Kendal Unda-gard undercoat
* student rates
* specializing in VW, Volvo,
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FRIDAY, April 7,4:15 P.M. Multipurpose Room, UGLI

NATIONAL SOCIETY OF PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERS
President
Executive Director
President-Elect

Center for Chinese Studies.
panel presentation
CHINA'S.
CURRENT
CRISIS:
The Meaning of the
Cultural Revolution
Alexander Eckstein
Donald Munro
Richard Solomon
APRIL 9, 4 P.M.
Auditorium A
Angell Hall

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN
Dean Van Wylen
Students

Time: 3-5 P.M., Thur., Apr. 6-Place: Rm. 3R&S, Union
Coffee Afterwards

1

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w

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wooplumm

Do

I

SUMMER JOBS
FOR STUDENTS
Applications now being accepted for summer jobs with major
corporation. Students 18 yrs. of age and over wanted to learn
marketing, sales promotion, and brand identification techniques
during summer period. High level executive management train-
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first 3 wks. $130 per wk. plus bonuses starting 4th wk.

JOIN THE
PSYCHOSEXUAL
REVOLUTION!
Petition for a glamorous, paying
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Do your part to celebrate the
150th 'anniversary of the "U" by
destroying it from within:
Fantastic positions
available
-Asst. Business
Manaaer

SCHOLARSHIPS
wi n one of 15 $1,000
scholarships
TRAVEL
Work anywhere in U.S. or
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SEE EUROPE
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an entire week.

Hurry!. "
The
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After 8 full house

11

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afe now on a Midwest To
TL.-- -. A /-.

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FR
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IDAY NITE-APRIL 7-LIVE
nf r rt"'im"TI CU W _".AS C. 'lfl.ff P AA

i

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