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April 04, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-04

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, "ELL 4, 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN I~AILY TUESDAY, APRIL 4, 1967

Gymnasts

Prove

Ability

in

Fine

NCAA

Finish

By JON SISKIN
"We knew we were a better team
than Iowa, and we proved it."
"After finishing second in the
Big Ten,.everybody .set their sights
on doing well in the NCAA's.
Thanks to a great all around team
effort, we showed ourselves and
the other teams at Carbondale
how good we really are." n
So spoke sophomore Dave Jacobs
in looking back over the NCAA
gymnastic finals held last weekend
in Carbondale, Illinois. Michigan,
coming through with a superb all-

around effort, surprised all the
observers by finishing second with
187.45 points, ahead of third place
Iowa, and behind defending cham-
pion and host Southern Illinois
with 189.55 points. And for a team
that was picked for no better than
sixth before the start of the tour-
nament, the Wolverines perform-
ance was nothing short of spec-
tacular.
Outstanding
Jacobs, a soft-spoken native of
Arlington, Texas, was not only the
standout Michigan performer but

was far and away the most out-
standing gymnast to compete in
the finals. Not only did he take
national honors on his specialty,
the trampoline, but also finished
Junior Wayne Miller has been
elected by his teammates as
gymnastics captain for 1967-68
season. Miller succeeds out-
going captain Gary Vander-
Voort.
Sophomore Dave J a c o b s,
meanwhile, was elected most
valuable gymnast of this year's
squad.

Wayne Miller sprained his ankles
and couldn't make the lineup," he
recalled. "The turning point came
a month ago in the Big Ten meet,
when I really found myself and
gained confidence."
His improvement continued into
the Mideast regionals where he
placed second behind Michigan
State's Toby Towson. Surprisingly,
.Towson failed even to qualify for
the finals at Carbondale, and with
him eliminated, Jacobs managed
to move in for the crown.
Although his accomplishments
were unequalled by anyone, Jacobs
was quick to heap praise on the
entire squad. "This high a finish
was by no means an individual
thing," he declared. "Each member

the final goal. Everyone hit their'
rout: es better than they have all
year, and this team effort is what
did the. trick."
"For the first time this year,
everything seemed to jell," bubbled
coach Newt Loken. "The boys putj
together their best and most con-
sistent overall performance of the
year, and it all added up to sec-
ond place."
Both Loken and Jacobs lauded
the work of junior Wayne Miller.
-Unable to get untracked for most
of the year due to injuries, he
came through with a magnificent
performance to finish second be-
hind Jacobs on the tramp. "I just
can't say enough for the way
Miller came through for us,"

. I

JUDY COLLINS
A BRIEF DESCRIPTION WOULD GO LIKE THIS
She has been praised continually for her warmth and her
c6ntinued willingness to use contemporary songs which
so often challenge us to look with her deep into the
anguish of our times.
EVIDENT IN ALL HER ALBUMS
IN MY LIFE
JUDY COLLINS 5th ALBUM
JUDY COLLINS CONCERT
JUDY COLLINS 3rd ALBUM
A MAID OF CONSTANT SORROW
THE GOLDEN APPLES OF THE SUN

In addition to Jacobs and Miller,
several other Wolverines distin-
quished themselves with first-rate
showings. Sophomore Fred Rod-
ney, who suffered a string of dis-
appointments this season, let loose
his frustrations to lead Michigan
to a third place finish on long
horse by placing ninth in the na-
tion.
Michigan's side horse team,
which has slipped on occasion this
year, surprised a lot of people by
riding the scores of Art Baessler,
Dave Geddes and Christ Vanden-
Broek to a fourth place finish. On
parallel bars, soph Dick Richard's
10th helped bring the Wolverines
to fifth in the nation.
Captain Gary VanderVoort, who
along with Baessler, VandenBroek,
Phip and Chip Fuller, and Cliff
Chilvers, closed out their varsity
careers at Carbondale, muscled his
way to fine scores on the high bar
and parallel 'bars. The Fuller
brothers bowed out by turning in
their usual steady rountines in
floor exercise and on long horse,
while Chilvers topped the Wolver-
ine ringmen with a score of 9.15.
Reflecting over the past season,
Loken echoed the sentiments of
the entire squad by saying, "Sure,
we were real disappointed not to
win our seventh straight Big Ten
championship, but the way the boys
bounced back to do so well in the
NCAA's made this a most success-
ful year for Michigan gymnastics.
"I'm already looking forward
with much anticipation to next
year, for with Jacobs, Miller, Rod-
ney, Richards and many others,
coming back . ..
Micki King
Takes Second
InAAUDiving
Micki King, a former University
student, qualified for indoor diving
at the Pan American Games in
Canada this summer by placing
second in the National AAU indoor
diving meet held Sunday at Ar-
lington, Texas.
Miss King took the runnerup
position behind Sue Gossick of
Tarzania, California. In winning
the crown, Miss Gossick became
the first defending champion to
keep the title two years in succes-
sion.
Miss King, who graduated last
year, works at present for the
ROTC recruiting office, but still
works out regularly at Matt Mann
Pool.

I

Fred Rodney

I

STEREO

List

... . .......... $5.79

MONO
$4.79
$3.49

This Week ..... ......$3.99

Th e Wu~iPc/ 80
1210 SOUTH UNIVERSITY

A'

Captain Gary Vander Voort

10 A.M. to 9 P.M.

761-0456.

ABA DRAFT
Dill, Aitch Among Picks
As New League Forms

,

i

I

I

KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR
" NO WAITING
" 8 BARBERS
" OPEN 6 DAYS
The Dascola Barbers
Near the Michigan Theatre

What next?

Follett's has the complete
line of Cliff's Notes..
Don't stumble through college days in

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Once you have your college di-
ploma, what are you going to do?
Why not consider becoming an
executive secretary?
Such a position will require you
to utilize your intelligence and edu-
cation and to exercise your imagi-
nation. You will be working di-
rectly with executives. And if you're
seeking an even greater challenge,
you will always find an opportunity
to advance to an administrative
position.
Gibbs offers a Special Course for
College Women. In just 811 months
you will receive complete secre-
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for a fine position as an executive
secretary.
Your next step? Write College
Deanfor GIBBS GIRLS AT
WORK.
KATHARI N E
GIBBS
SECRETARIAL
21 Marlborough St., BOSTON, MASS. 02116
200 Park Ave., NEW YORK, N. Y. 10017
33 Plymouth St., MONTCLAIR, N. J. 07042
77 S. Angell St., PROVIDENCE, R. 1. 02906

By The Associated Press
Graduating Wolverine senior
Craig Dill, standing 6'10" tall, and
Matthew Aitch, 6'?" center from
Michigan State, were among the
130 players selected in the first
draft of the American Basketball
Association.
Dill, who led Michigan in scor-
ing and rebounding, was drafted
by the ABA's Indianapolis fran-
chise, while Aitch, who helped
lead the Spartans to their first-
place tie in the Big Ten, was
picked by Dallas.
But the American Basketball
Association also dropped hints
that they would attempt to form
the nucleus of their squads around
established players whom they
hope to lure from the established
National Basketball Association.
In an effort to help lure the
college crop, as well as to entice
the pros from the other league,
the new loop established a pen-
sion plan, saying that service in
the older league would count in
determining length of service.
. The ABA did not divulge the
order in which they selected col-
legiates, a move designed to dis-
courage comparisons of signings
of early-round choices in the two
leagues.
But it is probable that several
prominent names found their way
near the top of the selections,
such as All-Americas Jim Walker
and Clem Haskins. Walker, the
Providence star who led major
colle es in scoring, was picked by
Indianapolis (which will be known
simply as Indiana in the league).
Haskins, meanwhile, went to

Louisville, along with teammate.
Dwight Smith and Kentucky's
Louis Dampier, as the Kentucky
city showed a preference for
home-grown talent.
Yet there weresmany surprises
and a lot of foulups in this initial
attempt by the fledging league.
New Orleans, fort'example, picked
normally at first, when suddenly
they named pole vault record-
holder Bob Seagren.
"This is ridiculous. It's impos-
sible," blurted Seagren from the
campus of Southern California.
"I haven't even touched a basket-
ball in five years." What's more,
the league first listed him as Bob
Seagrams of the University of
Washington.
Two teams drafted players list-
ed merely as "Smith, 6'10", Kent
State," and "Clark, 6'4", Eastern
Kentucky." Neither school claim-
ed knowledge of either of these
"first name unavailable" players.
The New York franchise, mean-
while picked "George Grant, 6'8",
Marshall." According to that
school, "We have a player named
Grant, but the NIT hero was
George Stone who attended Grant
High School in Covington, Ky.
"However, Stone is only a junior
and he is not a redshirt. Perhaps
they wasted a choice on him."
Indiana picked Gene Washing-
ton, MSU football star, who is ex-
pected to continue his gridiron
career professionally. He did play
basketball in high school.
The ABA consists of teams from
Anaheim, Dallas, Denver, Hous-
ton, Indiana, 'Louisville, Minne-
sota, New Orleans, New York,
Oakland, and Pittspurgh.

A

ROIAEO &JIUET

a daze. Know what you're studying
and know it well. That's what CLIFF'S
NOTES are all about..,. helping you
get through with understanding and
appreciation. How can you go wrong?
And, they only cost $1.00.

FRIDAY, April 7,4:15 P.M. Multipurpose Room, UGLI
THE CATHOLIC DILEMMA
A discussion of how U. S. Catholics view - THEIR RITES,
BIRTH CONTROL, DIVORCE, ABORTION, CELIBACY, THE
POPE- with
KENNETH WOODWARD, Religion Editor Newsweek Maga-
.;..; :::::.. >:=:::v;.- u I ljfttie1 1^ 1\-- - /'1 EL : ICf' n--M -

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