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April 02, 1967 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-02

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGNIN DAILY

SUNDAY, AP 2, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY, APRIL 2, 1967

'Shadow of a Doubt' Illustrates
Hitchcockian Style Throughout

By ANDREW LUGG
Jean Luc-Godard, the French
film-maker, talks of an uncanny
knack that American directors,
have of taking a simple story and
making its events exist to pro-
duce a work of art that has more
guts, moredepth and more fodder
for critical appraisal than even the
director himself realizes.
Alfred Hitchcock's "Shadow of
a Doubt" seems a case in point.
The story-line of this film is ex-
tremely simple. Charles (Joseph
Cotton) is the "Merry Widow
Murderer" who goes to live with
relatives in Santa Rosa to escape
from the police. A strong bond is
forged between him and his niece,
Charlie (Teresa Wright) and this
is his eventual undoing.'
This reviewer however will ob-
serve a respect for the mystery
of the detective story and merely
remark that the intricacies of this
plot are peculiarly Hitchcockian.
What makes "Shadow of a
Doubt" a much better film than
Thornton Wilder's scripting might
indicate is the way in which the
film is constructed. Made in 1943,
"Shadow" established Hitchcock
as a director who had a style of
his own and who imposed on his
films his own personality.
Hitchcock has a vast cinematic
vocabulary. He uses this carefully,
with discrimination, to squeeze
-out each scene every bit of emo-
tion and excitement that he can.
"Shadow" shows Hitchcock's
technical virtuosity and perhaps
points out why and how he can
get away with his perennial use
of characters more stereotypic
than those genre pfeces can usual-
ly encompass.
Charles corresponds nicely to
the devil in the those old Amer-
ican melodramas, except that this
devil is handsome; Charlie to the
innocent young girl and the de-
tective (Jack 'Graham) to him
who comes and saves.
It is working in what Satre calls
"the sphere of generalities" that
Hitchcock plays the ring-master

conducting the weird, in a manner,
which at worst stresses Hitchcock's
own egocentrism, and at best pre-
sents neat allegories-wonderful
material for the critical game..
Thus we might consider Charlie
and Charles as two aspects of the
same person, a dialectic between
a view of the world as "a foul sty,"
and a world conceived as pure ,and

beautiful.
Finally we might note the im-
portance of this film within an
historical context. Hitchcock in-
troduced a great deal of material
into the ,movie, dialogue and brief
scenes, purely for the rhythm of
the film and without much regard
for furthering the storyline. This
was revolutionary for the time.

Glee Club,1Sparlides
With Humorous Style

By JILL CRABTREE
Eighty-six University men in
'white tie and tails stride onto the
Hill Auditorium stage. Or rather,
85 men stride. One comes racing
in at the last minute on a uni-
cycle.
The event? The 109th annual
spring concert of the University
of Michigan Men's Glee Club,
which played last night to en-
thusiastic audiences.
The impressive list of prizes that
the group has won, including the
male choir competition at the In-
ternational Musical Eisteddfod in
Wales, where they have twice been
victorious, leaves little for a re-
viewer to say. It is obvious that
the group is excellent. What re-
mains is to attempt to describe
the moods and humor of a Glee
Club concert.
The first number that the Glee
Club sang last night was their
traditional opening hymn, "Laudes
Atque Carmina." This is a song
about "Universitas Michiganen-
sium," arranged especially for the
club by their director, Philip Duey.
It was done in a standard choral
singing style, but nevertheless in-
teresting.
The following piece was the one
that really got the concert off to
a good start, at least from the.
standpoint of the performers. It

was :"Dona Nobis Pacem," a 16th
Century canon. The quiet peace-
fullness and controlled beauty of
the work was unfortunately mar-
red by the rustling and whispering
of latecomers.
The first half of the concert
ended with "Pollution" by Tom
Lehrer a very timely satire ("Just
go out for a breath of air-you'll
be ready for Medicare.")
The Friars, a . group of eight
members of the Glee Club given
to snappy chatter and well-done
slapstick comedy, were the high-
light of the second half of the
concert. They sang "Mr. Bass
Man," a Mutt and Jeff routine
in which the very tallest member
of the group attempts to teach the
very smallest member how to sing
"way down low." Their closing
number was "The Draft Dodger
Rag," a satire even more timely
than "Pollution.'
A selection of Michigan songs
ended the concert. These includ-
ed a song about "P-Bell booze" as
well as the more sedate alma ma-
ter songs. The audience began to
sing along with the "Victors,"
and by the time the director turn-
ed, around to lead them in "Hur-
rah for the Yellow and Blue," they
were already singing full force.
It was a sentimental end to a re-
freshing evening.

The Week
: .A Campus
MONDAY, APRIL 3 1
4:15 p.m.-Vernon Wolcott, or-
ganist, will perform in a music
school Degree Recital at Hill Aud.
TUESDAY, APRIL 4
8:30 p.m.-The University Sym-
phony Orchestra, Theo Alcantara,
conductor, will perform in a music
school doctoral student concerto
concert at Hill Aud.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5
8:00 p.m.-The speech depart-
ment wfll present the University
Players performing Arthur Mil-
ler's "The Crucible" at Trueblood
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-William P. Malm
will dirgct a music school concert,
"Music of Southeast Asia" at Hill
Aud.
THURSDAY, APRIL 6
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-The Cinema
Guild will present Vsevolod Pu-
dovkin's "Mother" at the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The speech depart-
ment will present the University
Players performing Arthur Miller's
"The Crucible" at Trueblood Aud..
8:30 p.m.-The Stockholm Uni-
versity Chorus will perform as
part of the University Musical
Society Choral Union Series at
Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, APRIL 7
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild will present Vsevolod Pu-
dovkin's "Mother" in the Archi-
tecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The speech depart-
ment wil present the University
Players performing in Arthur
Miller's "The Crucible" at True-
blood Aud.
SATURDAY, APRIL 8
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild will p r e s e n t Clarence
Brown's "Intruder in the Dust"
in the Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Department of
Speech will present the University
ler's "The Crucible" at Trueblood
Players performing Arthur Mil-
Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
sal Society Choral Union Series
will present the Boston Symphony
Orchestra at Hill Aud.
SUNDAY, APRIL 9
2:30 p.m.-The University Musi-
cal Society Chamber Arts Series
will present the Boston Symphony
Chamber Players at Rackham
Aud.
2:30 p.m.-The speech depart-
ment will present the University
Players performing Arthur Miller's
"The Crucible" at Trueblood Aud.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild will p r e s e n t Clarence
UI DI5NEY

Brown's "Intruder in the Dust"
in the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present Eva Likova, soprano,
and James Herring, piano, in re-
cital at the Rackham Lecture Hall.
Television
EDITOR'S NOTE: Due to the
American Federation of Television
and Radio Artist's strike against
the three networks, television pro-
gramming 'for tihe coming week is,
to say tihe least, uncertain. Most
news and documentary shows, spe-
cials and shows which are done
live or on a short tape delay are
expected to be cancelled and re-
placed with movies or reruns. All
programming depends on the con-
tinued willingness of cameramen,
technicians and other studio per-
sonnel to continue crossing AFTRA
picket lines.
SUNDAY, APRIL 2
9:00 p.m.-DEATH OF A SALES-
MAN. Lee J. Cobb and Mildred
Dunnock star in this recreation of
the Broadway Production of Ar-
thur Miller's drama. This mag-
nificent David Susskind produc-
tion was . originally shown last
year. -2
TUESDAY, APRIL 4
11:30 p.m.-TO HELL AND
BACK. Audie Murphy, America's
most-decorated WWII soldier,
plays himself in this 1955 film of
battlefield heroics. -7
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 5
6:30 p.m.-TWILIGHT ZONE.
One of this long-running series
finest shows, "The Monsters Are
Due on Maple Street," is rerun.
THURSDAY, APRIL 6
10:30 p.m. - SUMMERHILL.
The CBC visits A.S. Neill's contro-
versial student-run English school.
-9
FRIDAY, APRIL 7
9:00 p.m.-MARKED WOMAN.
Bette Davis and Humphrey Bogart
star in a 1937 film about a woman
who tries to stop her sister from
finding out she is a hostess in a
clip joint. -50

To Come:
Calendar

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sit~y of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the 'day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Satsrday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Studentorganization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
Information call 764-9270.
SUNDAY, APRIL 2
Day Calendar
School of Music Concert-University
Symphony Band, William Revelli, con-.
ductor; Susan Nelson, saxophone solo-
ist: Hill Aud., 4:16 p.m.
Cinema Guild - Alfred Hitchcock's
"Shadow of a Doubt": Architecture
Aud., 7 and 9:05 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Sheilah Bernstein, mezzo soprano: Re-
cital Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Peace Corps Recruitment: 3200 SAB,
Mon., April 3 through Wed., April 5.
No appointments necessary. 8:30 a.m.
to 4:30 p.m. For information, call Miss
webber, Bureau of Appointments, 764-
7460.
Linguistics Dept. Lecture: Prof. Ro-
man Jakobson, Harvard Univ., "Saus-
surian 'Cours' and Linguistic, Vistas
of Today": Mon., April 3, Aud. A, An-
gell Hall, 8 p.m.
Science Research Club Meeting: Jo-
seph D. Morris, thoracic surgery, "Re-
vascularization of the Heart"; Daniel
Sinclair, "Bubble Chamber": Tues.,,
April 4, Rackham Amphitheatre, 7:30
a.mn.
Dept. of Germanic Languages and
Literatures Dramatic Reading: Dr. Fred-
erick Ritter, former professional actor,
Lessing's "Nathan der Weise": Tues.,
April 4, Aud. A, Angell Hall, 8 p.m.
Student Tea: At the home of Presi-
dent and Mrs. Harlan Hatcher. Aull
students are cordially invited. Wed.,
April 5, 4 to 6 p.m.
Student Accounts: Your attention is
called to the following rules passed by
the Regents at their meeting on Feb.
28, 1936: Students shall pay all accountk
due the University not later than the
last day of classes of each semester
or summer session. Student loans which
are not paid or renewed are subject to

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

this regulation; however, student loans
not yet due are exempt. Any unpaid
accounts at the close of business or
the last day of classes will be reported
to the Cashier of the University and
a) All academic credits will be with-
held, the grades for the semester or
Ssummer session just cnmpleted will not
be released, and no transcript of credits
will be issued.
b) All students owing such accounts
(Continued on Page 8)
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room loll SAB.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,
Mon., April 3, 8:30-10:30 p.m., women's
Athletic Bldg.
*g- a
Hillel Foundation, Deli House, April
2, 5:30 p.m., '1429 Hill. "Meet the Edi-
tor." with Roger Rapoport. Call 663-
4129 for reservations.
Russian Circle, Russky Kruzhok, tea
and Russian conversation, Tues., April
4, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Phi Sigma Society, Lecture, April 3,
7:30 p.m., Rackham Amphitheatre,
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., Sun., April 2, worship
services at 9:30 and 11 a.m. Speaker at
7 p.m.: Dr. Robert F. Borkenstein, Dept.
of Police Administration, Indiana Uni-
versity, "The. Legal Responsibility of
an Adult World in Maintaining Law
and Order."
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, April 2, 9,45 and 11:15 a.m.
services: "Confessing the Risen Christ,"
Pastor Scheips. Bible class at 11:15 a.m.
Daily Classifieds
Bring Quick Results

RU ILD
TONIGHT
Alfred Hitchcock's
SHADOW OF
A DOUBT
With Joseph Cotten,
Teresa Wright,
MacDonald Carey.
Script by
Thorton Wilder.
Murder and
Suspense in asmaI
American town.
7:00 & 9:05 P.M.
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
mSTILL ONLY 50c"

S

HILLEL DELI HOUSE
TODAY AT 5:30 P.M.

Meet ROGER RAPOPORT
Editor, Michigan Daily
Call 663-4129 for Reservations

Mao Forces See Victory Over Communist
Opposition, Head for Showdown Phase

3

NOW!

FHA&Ilm,

DIAL
8-6416

1429 HILL STREET

ALL WELCOME

I

"A superb, gripping film .
tells a strong suspense story.
-INGENUE Magazine

By WILLIAM L, RYAN
Associated Press Special Correspondent
The forces in China supporting
the Mao Tse-tung view of Chinese
and world revolution appear to
scent total victory over their op-
ponents in the Communist party
and to be'headed for the show-
down phase of the 'Great Proleta-
rian Cultural Revolution."
For the first. time they' have
displayed enough strength to at-
tack the powerful opposition
through one of the most important
organs 'of the party press, the
theoretical journal Red tFlag.
A total Maoist victory would
have meaningful repercussions.
Inside China it probably would
mean a long period of austerity
under a regime akin to a military
dictatorship.
Chinese Isolation
Outside, it wduld mean con-
tinued isolation of China and the
end for the foreseeable future of
any chance of reconciliation with
the Soviet Communist party. It
could even lead to a formal rup-
ture.
The battle is not over, at least
in many of the hinterland prov-
inces, particularly those in the
north bordering on the Soviet
Union. Powerful men remain at
large who have been vilified by the
cultural revolution and who con-
tinue to have, evidently, impor-
tant support.
But in Peking, the dominant
pro-Mao group shows signs of
rising confidence. It has struck
openly, publicly and officially at
the chief foe, President Liu Shao-
chi.
The attack took the form of a
denunciation of "How to be a
Good Communist," a 1939 Liu lec-
ture issued as a primer for Com-
munists. It was recently reissued
to reflect anti-Moscow views and
"national" Chinese communism.

It has been clear for months
that the dogmatic, intensely anti-
foreign wing of the party was
headed by Defense Minister Lin
Piao, with the support of Premier
Chou En-lai. "Mao Tse-tung's
thinking" was its slogan, as if the
doctrine were more important
than the physical presence of the
leader himself.
On the other side were the
forces of President Liu and Teng
Hsiao-ping, party secretary-gen-
eral, allied with influential ele-
ments both in the party and the
armed forces. But Lin Piao, Chou
and their allies evidently feel they
can depend on the bulk of the
army leadership cadres.
This appears to mean that the
Lin Piao-Chou forces, behind the
facade of "Mao's thinking," are
striking out for total control, to
be enforced by the army.
Formidable Groups
Behind them is a formidable
group of fanatically anti-West and
anti-Soviet leaders:
Chen Po-ta, once Mao's private
secretary and ghost writer, now
Politburo member in charge of
the revolutionary purge.
Kang Sheng, long experienced
in secret police work, once pub-
licly praised, by Joseph Stalin, is
the Politburo member who "ad-
vises" on the purge.
Yeh Chien-ying, a general be-
fore Lin abolished army ranks, is
now a Politburo member and vice
chairman of the powerful Military
Affairs Commission.
Hsieh Fu-chih, vice premier and
chief of public security forces,
whose activities would be a key
to Maoist success.
Hsiao Hua, deputy leader of the
cultural revolution and its direc-
tor in the army as head of the
General Political Department.
Yang Cheng-wu, who replaced
the Lo Jui-ching, chief of staff of

the armed forces, whose opposition
was believed have brought the na-
tion to the brink of civil war last
July.
Chiang Ching, Mao Tse-tung's
fourth wife, now deputy chief of
the cultural revolution and adviser
on the purge to the army and in
cultural affairs.
All took part last week in a
Peking conference of "proletarian
revolutionaries" at which Chou
disclosed that the cultural revolu-
tion still was not ended and urged
total effort against "the handful
of party people in authority tak-
ing the capitalist road."
The official attack on President
Liu could be the opening gun in
a final phase of the struggle to
shape China's future.

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe

"VIVID AND
IMAGINATIVE ... HIGHLY
ORIGINAL AND
THOUGHT-PROVOKING!''
-Saturday Review

NOON LUNCHEON 25c
SPEAKER:.ARTHUR COLLINGSWORTH
National Young Republican
Foreign Affairs Committee
STUDENTS, VOTE IN THE CITY ELECTION

Julie
Christie
her first role since,
her Academy Award
for"Darting"

fahrenheit
451"

Oskar
Werner
winner of the
New York Critics'
Best Actor Award

I

I

U- _____________________________________ ..---'-'-----.

presents

An evening of

ANDY WARHOL
at HILL AUDITORIUM
"THE EXPLODING PLASTIC
INEVITABLE"

With;

I

Do you like picnics? Then come to the
U-M Gilbert & Sullivan

MASS
April 2-7:30

MEETING

I

1. Election of officers

2. Slides from "PATIENCE"

I

U II

!I

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