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April 01, 1967 - Image 15

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-04-01

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SATURDAY, .APRIL 1, 1967

THE MICHI A N DAILY

FACE SF.VrV

SATU1LDA~Y, APRIL 1, 1967 THE 1~HCIHGA 1~T DAILY

[ .slla4' ,>G JV *G:V

4

Dave Jacobs Dick Richards

Cliff Chilvers Gary Vandervoort

Gymnasts

Place

Second

to

SIU

in NCAA

Tourney

I

Gain Revenge on Iowa;
VanderVoort, Rodney Star

*

*

*

*

*

*

EXHIBITION BASEBALL
NATIONAL LEAGUE

IKan sas Sets Medley Mark;
Matson Throws Discus 201'

Special To The Daily1
CARBONDALE, Ill.-The Michi-
gan gymnastics team came
through with a brilliant perform-
ance to end up second in the na-
tion to Southern Illinois in the
NCAA tournament yesterday.
The Wolverines had a score of
187.4 compared to 189.55 for the
Salukis, but the big story was
the success against Iowa.
Michigan topped the Hawkeyes
by one-half of a point (a respect-
able margin in gymnastics) which
can be contrasted with a one-for-
tieth of a point victory over Iowa
in the dual meet between the
two squads, and a loss by almost
three points in the Big Ten meet.
It was this loss that cost Newt
Loken's squad its conference
championship.
Iowa's score was 186.9, followed
by Penn State's 186.15, Iowa.
State's 185.55, UCLA's 182.3,
Springfield, Mass., 177.65, South-
ern t'alifornia's 176.30, Califor-
nia's 175.95, and Colorado State's
166.9.
The meet was dominated by the
three teams who took part in the
Mideast regionals in Wheaton, Ill.
Last year California finished sec-
ond and Michigan fifth.
Michigan's performance depend-
ed upon a great comeback by a
number of team members who
were disappointing in the Big
Tens.
Heading the list was Fred Rod-
ney who scored a 9.3 in vaulting
after fouling in the Big Tens. Rod-
ney also came through with a sig-
nificant 8.35 in the parallel bars
as the Wolverines were desperate-
ly trying to hold off Iowa.
Captain Gary Vander Voort,
recently recuperating from a
shoulder injury, showed he was
fully recovered as he scored a
9.05 in high bar, and 8.85 in the
parallel bars, and an 8.75 on the
rigs.
Vander Voort was anxious to
give credit to the rest of the team:
"Each man came to the NCAA's
knowing what he had to do and
did it. I'm proud of the entire
team. It was a tremendous team
effort."
None of this is to leave out the
number one on the trampoline
old reliables. Dave Jacobs was
with a 9.45. Defending NCAA
champion Wayne Miller hobbled
by injuries all year long, scored
a 9.25. Coach Loken, greatly pleas-
ed by Miller's recovery, called his
performance "easily his best of

1 the year," as his total was third
highest.
Complementing the two tramp
giants, Mike Zadel turned in a
fine 8.55 .
The Wolverine tramp team
cumulative score of 27.25 was the
best in the country.
Also number one was the floor
exercize score of 27.35. A rapidly
improving Jacobs had the second
best score, a 9.4. And Chip and
Phiu Fuller finished ninth and
tenth.
Vaulting was the other out-
standing event for Michigan, as
the gymnasts scored a 'fabulous
27.6. Besides Rodney's 9.3, Chip
Fuller had a 9.25 and Phip Fuller,
a 9.05.
The hide horse, normally a re-
latively weak event for the Wol-
verines, found Michigan fourth
in the country with Art Baessler
scoring a 9.0, Dave Geddes an
8.6, and Chris Vanden Broek an
8.55.
he high bar saw Vander Voort's
9.05 followed by Mike Sasich's 8.75
and Scott Paris' 8.55.
All events except the vaulting,
rings, and parallel bars were con-
tested in the afternoon. And at
the dinner break, Michigan even
led Southern Illinois 107.0 to
106.55.
However, the three evening
events are not normally among
the Wolverines strongest, so no
actual victory was anticipated.
But after the amazing vaulting
performance, Michigan was still
contending.
And even though they didn't
pull it out, there was no disgrace
in Cliff Chilver's 9.15 ring per-
formance, or the 8.75 posted by
both Vander Voort and Larry
Metnick.
Then sophomore Dick Richards
took over. His 9.05 on the parallel
bars was followed by Vander
Voort's 8.85 and Rodney's 8.35.
These unexpectedly high scores
secuted the second place finish.
A breathless Loken could only
echo Vander Voort's "tremendous
performance." And while appre-
ciating Michigan's own perform-
ance, he also lauded the work of
Makot Sakamoto's 9.5 in the pa-
rallel bars for USC, Steven Co-
hen's 9.4 in the high bar for Penn
State, the Saluki's Paul Mayer's
9.55 in vaulting, and John Robin-
son's rings score for 9.6 for Cali-
fornia, and of the 9.55 posted by
Keith McCanless of Iowa on the
sidehorse.

San Francisco
x-Pittsburgh
x-Cincinnati
St. Louis
x-Houston
New York
Atlanta
Chicago
x-Los Angeles
x-Philadelphia

'I:
14
12
12
12
9
8
7
8
7
7

L
6
6
7
8
10
11
10
12
11
12

WILT CIIAMBERLAIN

Chamberlain,
Leads '76ers
Over Celtics
By The Associated Press
PHILADELPHIA -- The devas-
tating inside-outside duo of Wilt
Chamberlain and Hal Greer car-
ried the Philadelphia 76ers to a
127-113 victory over the Boston
Celtics last night and a 1-0 lead in{
the National Basketball Associa-
tion's best of seven Eastern divi-
sion final playoffs.
Greer pumped in 39 points,
mostly on long jump shots. Cham-
berlain added 24 points, but even
more important was his 12 assists.
Philadelphia jumped out to a
six-point lead in the first period,
and then poured it on in the se -
ond taking a commanding 66-49
halftime lead.
Boston closed the gap to three
points in the third period, but was
unable to put together a sustained
drive in the last period as Phila-
delph'a held on to its 14-point
lead.
Boston was led by Sam Jones,
with 24 points, john Havlicek withl
22 points, and player-coach Bill
Russell with 20 points, but the
typical "Boston balance" of yes-
ter-year was no longer there.

A strange and horrible deed
shook the entire sports world early
this morning.
At about 12:01 a m., The Daily
received a report disclosing an
outrageous robbery, which alleg-
edly took place in the official of-
fices of the American Baseball
League.
A sad and bleary-eyed Ameri-
can League President, Joe Cronin,
announced to a hastily-assembled
press audience that the Official
American League Seal had been
pilfered from the main offices
moments before.
Immediately, the cream of the
police corps organized a massive
search for the criminal, suspected
to be a National League sup-
porter.
Cronin maintained at the press
conference that the American
League would be unable to com-
mence the 1967 season until the
Seal is recovered. "This could well
sjell the end for us," cried Cron-
in, "the Junior Circuit may perish
entirely unless the Seal is re-
turned."
One observer speculated that
the thief may have fled to Alaska,
where there supposedly is an open
season on Seals. All the roads to
Anchorage, however, are securiely
anchored by staunch policemen:
and the airways are seaed by the
American Air Patrol.
Several moments after the end
of the press conference, Cronin
re-emerged with a sly and furtive
look on his face to read a short
poem to the stunned audience.
Listen members of the press,

AUSTIN, Tex. (M)-Kansas set
a world .record of 3:15.2 in the
sprint medley relay last night
with the great Jim Ryun running
a blistering 1:46.1 half-mile an-
chor leg.
It wiped out the old mark by
three-tenths of a second. Dwight
Peck, doing the quarter-mile stint,
had 46.5.
The time was 4.2 seconds under
the Texas Relays record.
The record smashed by Ryun
and his cohorts was 3:15.5 set by
the Santa Clara Youth Village in
1961._
Ryun,. running easily, didn't
turn on the steam until he hit the
back stretch of the last lap. He
had Leroy Storbeck of Southern
Methodist dogging his heels when
he finally let himself out. He was
ahead of Storbeck by 15 yards at
the finish.

Gary Ard and Ben Olison did
42.6 combined for the two 220's,
then Peck slashed his way to 46.5
in the quarter and handed the
baton to Ryun for the big finish.
The wind was 4.5 miles per
hour, well below the allowable.
Randy Matson, Texas Aggie
giart. threw the discus 201 feet,
1 inch to break his own intercol-
legiate record and set his second
record of the meet during the day.
The throw bettered Matson's
intercollegiate record of 200 feet,
7% inches and also his Texas Re-
lays record of 188-8.
He set the records in the pre-
liminaries but in the discus finals
Friday night could get only 197
feet, 6% /2inches. The shot finals
are today when he will be after
his world's record of 70 feet, 71j
inches.

Chicago
Detroit
New Yo
Minnes
Boston

AMERICAN LEAGUE
13
10
ork 11]
ota 104
101

6
10
10
10

A CAREER AS A CHICAGO TEACHER
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Tenure after Three Years
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Washington 9 9 .500
California 9 11 .450
Cleveland 9 11 .450
x-Baltimore 8 11 .421
Kansas City 7 12 .368
x-Night game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Atlanta 4, Minnesota 2
Chicago (A) 6, New York (N) 4
New York (A) 3, Boston 1
St. Louis 12, Kansas City 2
Washington 3, Detroit 1 (10 Inn)
San Francisco 10, California 6
Cleveland 6, Chicago (N) 3
Cincinnati vs. Philadelphia at Clear-
water, Fia. (n)
Pittsburgh vs. Baltimore at Ponce,
P.R. (n)
Houston vs. Los Angeles at Houston
(n)

- . .h"..v

WORSHIP

Do not blow your cools.
'Lest posterity brands you
A bunch of 'April Fools.'

asI

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
SOCRATES
Lose Something?
Find it with a
Daily Classified

p

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1131 Church St.
761 -0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenow Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-'Holy Communion and Baptism.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:15 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Service.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "Afterglow Without Actuality."
Easter-tide Cantata, Senior Choir.
7:00 p.m. - Wesley Fellowship, Wesley
Lounge. Movie, "Lonely Are the Brave,"
discussion following.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in'
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Din-
ner with movie "The Detached Americans."
Discussion follows.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Pine Room. Din-
ner. Illustrafed talk on India.
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 p.m.-Speaker: Dr. Robert F. Borken-
stein, Dept. of Police Administration, In-
diana University, "The Legal Responsibility
of an Adult World in Maintaining Law and
Order."
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewuod
Across from Ann Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School.
11:00 a.m.--Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.

STU DENTSP
Transportation Specials
With
ECONO-CAII '

WEDNESDAY
7:30 psm.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

C.
A t
M ti t. u
/ O .
t

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev. Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-U. Fellowship Coffee Presession.
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Study.
11:00 a.m.-"The Object and Objective of
Real Love for Christ."
7:00 p.m. "U. Students Night"--includ-
ing the new Inter-Varsity film, "Urbana
'64."
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Saturday at 9:00a.m.-All day regional Gam
ma Delta Convention.
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m. - Worship
Services.
Sunday at 1 1 :15 a.m.-Bible Study.
Wednesday at 8:30 p.m.-Chapel Assembly.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Mid-week devotion
with Holy Communion.
GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday Schoqi.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
cundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.
--- ---1 0 21 9V

438 W. Huron

663-2033

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YPSILANTI STATE HOSPITAL

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