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March 24, 1967 - Image 8

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-24

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAY, MARCH 24, 1967

'NEW MORALITIES':
Aiken Compliments
Youthful Idealism

By ANNE BUESSER
Dr. Henry Aiken, visiting pro-
fessor of philosophy from Brandeis
University, praised "last ditch
idealism," for today's youth at a
National Student Sesquicentennial
Conference yesterday. He spoke to1
student leaders from various uni-]
versities on "The New Morality."
Dr. Aiken explained that "There
is no such thing as 'new moral-
ity'," but instead a set of "new
moralities" resulting from life in?
"an age and time of perpetual9
crisis."
Constant confrontation of ex-
treme situations forces the young
person to question the validity off
the, established morality: A stu-
dent cannot have faith in the con-
tinuing development of man when
he is haunted by the "genuine
recurrent possibility of extinction
of the human race."
Another major reason cited for
the disillusionment in the younger
generation is the "central incapa-
city of our central institutions to
solve the major social and spir-
Itual problems." He noted the
breakdown of the family, "venal-
ity and disorder" in educational
institutions, subservience, of much
scientific research to the state,
and deepening international disor-
ders.
As a result, said Dr. Aiken,
"there is a dimming sense of re-
Narrow List of
Candidates for
'U' Presidency
(Continued from Page 1)
It is reported that Briggs has
been doing "a scrupulously ob-
jective, thorough and fair job" in
the presidential selection process.
"He's been terrific," says a Regent.
The Regents are also paying
close 'attention to faculty and stu-
dent advisory committees.
All the prime prospects are
being checked out for acceptabil-
ity with the faculty and student
committees. "We'll eliminate a
prospect who the faculty or stu-
dents are against," says one Re-
gent.
The Regents have compiled ex-
tensive dossiers on all candidates
"It's a terribly impressive group
of candidates," says one Regent
"Everyone's got a Phi Beta Kappa
key."
They are moving very cautiously
before actually making an offer.
"We don't want to offer it to a
man and have him turn it down,"
says another Regent.
Reports indicate that Hatcher
has remained scrupulously im-
partial during the selection pro-
cess." He hasn't done one thing or
said one word to try to influence
the selection process," reports a
Regent. "He's being a perfect
gentleman about it."
The Regents remain confident
they can get the "right" man for
the post. "After all," says one
Regent, "It's not a bad job and it
pays pretty well."

sponsibility on the part of the!
most gifted and self-conscious
youth to the institutions they nev-
er made and from which they are
excluded."
In response, the individual may
lose respect for any authority, or
he may adopt what Dr. Aiken par-
alleled with the "classical Greek
attitude." This means believing in
the value of self-development and
perfection, and "sharing in the
sense that the individual ,person
is profoundly deserving of respect."
'This is what Dr- Aiken termed
"last ditch idealism," "the most
authentic sort of idealism possi-
ble in the age in which we live."
There are those, however, who
do not accept the responsibility
of the Greek ideal. These are the
people who misuse the new morali-
ties by "confusing eccentricity
with individuality." They do not
distinguish between pure novelty
and originality. They advocate di-
versity for its own sake, and for-
get that "The right to conform is
as significant as the right to be
different."
Dr. Aiken summed up this tend-
ency with the label "fickleness."
He remarked on the decline of in-
terest in the civil rights move-
ment and the Vietnam issue.
"'Flaming Creatures' and 'Blow
Job' ought not to compete with
Vietnam. It is our prime concern."

Officials Call
For Action one
Fiscal Plan
(Continued from Page 1)
"We expect an increase through
fiscal reform," he said, "but if the
appropriation remains unchanged,
we will have no recourse but to
raise student fees." The hike
there would be about $75 per stu-
dent per year.
Serious Discrepancy
Wayne State University Presi-
dent William R. Keast said that
there is a "serious discrepancy"
between Wayne's budget request
and the governor's $33.8 million
recommendation.
Keast said that Wayne officials
are now considering "the mini-
mum with which we can run this
university, and all possible means
methods to meet the cut in the
proposed budget." He said that
the university has already insti-
tuted budget restraints to "insure
maximum flexibility of the budget
next year."
At Western Michigan Univer-
sity Robert Wetnight, vice presi-
dent for finance said "the amount
which the new budget allots West-
ern Michigan is certainly less than
our projected needs."
Eastern Michigan University of-
ficials told the visiting Appro-
priations Committee that in their
interpretations, Romney's budget
proposals are "not realistic," ac-
cording to Louis Profit, vice presi-
dent for finance.

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The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3564 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication. For more
information call 764-9270.
FRIDAY, MARCH 24
Day Calendar
Symposium on Astrogeology-Rack-
ha'm Bldg., 9 a.m.
Psychology Colloquium - Dr. Chris-
toph Heinicke, Reiss-Davis Clinic, Los
Angeles, topic to be announced:,Aud,
B, Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m. Coffee will
be served from 3:45 to 4:15, 3417
Mason Hall.
Astronomical Colloquium-C. T. Bol-
ton, C. Gordon, R. M. Humphreys and
R. L. Sears, Astronomy Dept., "Sym-
posium on the Spiral Structure of Our
Galaxy, March 16-17, Steward Observa-
tory, Tucson, Ariz.": 807 Physics-As-
tronomy Bldg., 4 p.m.
Cinema Guild-Alain Resnais' "Nuit
at Brouillard (Night and Fog)" and
John Huston's "Let There le. Light":
Architecture Aud., 7 and 9:05 p.m.
Astronomy Dept. Visitors' Night-Dr.
Richard G. Teske, "Between the Plan-
ets." After the lecture the Student Ob-
servatory, fifth floor, Angell Hall, will
be open for inspection and for tele-
scope observations of Moon and Jupiter.
Children welcomed accompanied by an
dult. Fri., March 24, Aud. D, Angell
Hall, 8 p.m.
General Notices
Doctoral Examination for Wayne Law-
rence Myers, Forestry; thesis: "Distri-
bution of Oviposition Slits Constructed
by Oberea schaumii Leconte and Sa-
perda concolor Leconte (Coleoptera:
Cerambycidae) an Aspen Suckers (Pop-
ulous tremuloides Michaux)," Sat.,
March 25, Room 1032 Natural Re-
sources Bldg., at 9 a.m. Chairman, F.
B. Knight.
Doctoral Examination for Jacqueline
Lucelis' DeCamp,' Speech; thesis: "A
Study of Punctuation in the First Folio
Edition of Shakespeare's Anthony and
Cleopatra," Sat., March 25, East Coun-
cil Room. Rackham Graduate 'School,
at 1 p.m. Chairman, Claribel Baird,
Events

events are approved for the' coming netka, III.-Assistant Director, responsi-
weekend. Social chairmen are reminded ble for operation of recreational and
that requests for approval for social camping programs conducted by this
events are due in the Office of Student privately operated recreation center.
Organizations not later than 12 o'clock College grad with quatlifications and
noon on Wednesday prior to the event. exper. in rec., camping.-phys. ed.,
FRI., MARCH 24- or related areas of education.
Alpha Delta Phi, TGIF & Record Philadelphia College of Textiles and
Party; Alpha Epsilon Pi, Open-Open; Science, Phila., Pa.-Assistant in fund
Alpha Sigma Phi, Open-Open - Room raising and public relations. 2-3 yrs.
Parties; Beta Theta Pi, TG & Open- exper. plus journ., adv., public rela-
Open; Chi Psi, Party; Delta Sigma Phi, tions. radio-TV or Engl. degree. Man
Party; Delta Upsilon, Record Party; who is a writer, some exper. in pub)-
Kappa Sigma, TG & House Party; cations. much public contact.yC
Phi Delta Theta, Open-Open; Phi Ep- Case Institute of Technology, Cleve-'
silon Pi, Party, land, Ohio-Research Fellowships for
Phi Gamma Delta, Open House; Phi summer 1967 in Electrical Sciences and
Kappa Tau, Open-Open; Phi Sigma Applied Physics Groups of Engineer-
Delta, Open-Open; Psi Upsilon, Party; ing Division at the institute. 10 weeks,
Sigma.Alpha Epsilon, Electrical Mango with stipend, upper quartile. junior-
Party; Sigma Nu, Open-Open Room year students in set., engrg. and math.
Party; Sigma Pi, TG & Open-Open; Application deadline May 15,
Tau Delta Phi, Open-Open; Tau Epsi- Saginaw Museum. Saginaw, Mich. -
Ton Phi, Open-Open Party; Zeta Beta ing ground for person with imagina-
Tau, Open-Open. Director of Art Museum. Good train-
SAT., MARCH 25-- tion and some zeal.
Anderson, EQ, Date Affair; Alphaj***
Delta Phi, Record Party; AlphaASig- For further information please call
ma Phi, Open-Open Room Parties; Al- '764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
pha Epsilon Pi, Party & Parent's Lunch; Appointments, 3200 SAB.
Beta Theta Pi, Band Party; Chi Phi,
Party; Chi Psi, Party; Delta hi, Rec- SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE;
ord Party; eDlta Tau Delta, Open- 212 SAB-
Open; Delta Upsilon, Band Party; Kap- INTERVIEWS:
pa Sigma, House Party; Lambda Chi MON., MARCH 27-
Alpha, Record Party ; Camp Winnegaboe, Canadian-Coed.
Phi Delta Theta, Open-Open; Phi )-5 p.m. Male & female for counse-
Epsilon Pi, Party; Phi Gamma Delta, lors.
Open House: Phi Kappa Tau, Open: Camp Missaukee, Mich.-Girls. 10-4
Open; Phi Sigma Delta, Mod Party; p.m. Unit directors, spec. in arts &
Pi Lambda Phi, Open-Open Cave Par- crafts, nature, one cook and two as-
ty; Psi Upsilon, Party; Sigma Alpha sistant cooks.
Epsilon, Party; Sigma Alpha Mu, Pledge Details and applications at Summer
Theme Party; Sigma Nu, Open-Open Placement Service, 212 SAB, lower level.
Room Party; Sigma Pl, Open-Open; Tau____ _____
Delta Phi, Pledge Formal; Tau Epsi-
lon Phi, Open-Open Party; Tau Kappa
Epsilon, Band Party; Theta Xi, Party;
Triangle, Party & Open-Open; Zeta
Beta Tau, Open-Open.
SUN., MARCH 26--
Alpha Epsilon Pi, Parent's Lunch;
Chi Phi, Party.

LYDIA
April 1-
April 2-

presented by LA SOCIEDAD HISPANICA
MENDELSSOHN Tickets: $1 & $2
-8:00 P.M. 2076 Frieze Building
-2:30 & 8:00 P.M. Mon.-Fri. 9-12, 1-5
- - - -U

I

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
A L Y O F F I 1.. . ... .. .".:"r.' :::....'.'.'.'.. . :.'.* ... ter,. ;::.::::::.::'::..'1"..... :

BLOOD WEDDING
(Bodas de Sangre)
DRAMA By FEDERICO GARCIA LORCA

DR. DONALD RUCKNAGEL
WILL LECTURE ON
"HUMAN GENETICS"
TODAY at 12:09
COMMONS ROOM, LANE HALL
Sponsored by the Southern Asia Club

THREE EASTER SERVICES
AT
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State at Huron and Washington
Sunday, March 26
8:30-10:00-11:30 A.M.
ENCOUNTER WITH LIFE
Dr. Hoover Rupert Preaching at each Service
EASTER CHORAL MUSIC
Mary McCall Stubbins. Organist
11:15 A.M. to 12:30 P.M.:
Service Broadcast. WOIB-amWOIA-fm

A4

Isaacson:'Art Must Become
Reality To Improve World'

By TERRY TROY
Life is an illusion: art has no
choice but to become the reality,
explained Prof. Joel Isaacson of
the history of art department
yesterday.
The first ,speakerin the Na-
tional Student Sesquicentennial
Conference, Isaacson spoke on "Is
Social Change Reflected in the
Arts?" to a small audience at
Lydia Mendelssohn Theater.
Because of his belief that "art
and the world today have one
to one relationship," Isaacson
deemed it necessary to have an
understanding of society before
attempting an understanding of
contemporary art.
"I am profoundly pessimistic
about society," Isaacson said:
"Thirty-five to fifty million Amer-
icans are poor; the Negro is ex-
cluded from society; cities are at
the point of decay; technological
advances are not being matched
by advantages in ways to deal
with the resultant human dis-
placement; and the pressures to-
ward conformity are overwhelm-
ing."
In addition, he asserted that the
United States is "fighting a war
against have-nots," an illegal, im-
moral, irrational war.
Only art, Isaacson continued,
can prevent the holocaust towards
which we are moving. There must
be a reversal caused by art--a
new concern for the individual,
and increased sensibility.
The function of contemporary
art is not just to inform the

viewer of the conditions that exist,
Isaacson said, but to actually try
to transform the world.
"This cannot be accomplished
with an all-encompassing, simul-
taneous change of heart in all peo-
ple: art communcites to the in-
dividual; if enough individuals re-,
ceive the increased sensibility that
art has to give, society might
change."
To relate art .to life, then, there
is a necessary link, Isaacson ex-
plained. If the person contemplates
art, and contemplates it' in per-
son, he emphasized, he can withj
his heightened sensibility bridge
the gap between the reality of art,
and the falsity of life.
Isaacson used slides to illustrate
various examples of contemporary
art, projecting images whose con-
cerns included civil 'rights, urban
sprawl, male potency, abortion
laws, and affluence.
Isaacson implied a rebuttal to
the statement that art "reflects"
social change. "Previous gener-
ations' artists reflected reality in
their works, yet a work was not
considered complete until the
viewer himself contributed to the
work." Now, however, "people
don't look at art, art looks at peo-
ple." "4Art," Isaacson said, "is the
reality, not the reflection.'

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Placement

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Gradu-
ates and seniors make appointments by
4' p.m. of the day preceding the visits'
by the following companies. All em-
ployers expect to see your file before
the interview Please return forms and
update your files as soon as possible.
Call 764-7460, General Division Desk
MON., MARCH 27-
.Navy,Detroit-Male & female.
Seeking men and women interested in
Officer Training.
TUES., MARCH 28-
U.S. Navy, Detroit-See Monday list-
ing.
Michigan Civil Service Commission,
Lansing, Mich.-Male & female. BA/
adv. degrees all fields for trainee pro-
;rams in Admin. Anal., Buyer, Econ.
Res., Highway Plan., Inst. Mkmt.. Insur.
Exam., Personnel Tech.. Corrections
Psych.and others.
WED., MARCH 29-
U.S. Navy, Detroit-See Monday list-
U.S. Marines, Detroit-Men interest-
ed in Officer Training.I
National Institutes of Health, Beth-
sda, Md.-Male & female. Any de-
ree and major, for positions in Biol.,
Zoo., Mgmt. Trng., Personnel, Public
Admin., Stat., Writing (Tech.), Science.
Holt, -Rinehart and Winston, Inc.,
Chicago, Ill.-BA/adv. degrees Anthro.,
Biochem., Chem., Econ., Engl., Fine
Arts, For. Lang., Gen. Lib. Arts, Geog.,
;eol., Hist., Journ., Math, Microbiol.,
Mbusic, Philo., Phys., Poll. Sci., Psych.,
Speech Soc. and Social Work for Terri-
torial Sales (campus reps. to cal; on
professors).

V M10iA

SABBATH SERVICE
FRIDAY at 7:15 P.M.
Dr. Herman Jacobs
will review
Blood Accusation
by Maurice Samuel

*

The following sponsored

student

Across
Campus.
FRIDAY, MARCH 24
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Alain Resnais'
"Nuit et Brouillard (Night and
'Fog)" and John Huston's "Let,
There Be Light" in the Architec-
ture Aud.
SATURDAY, MARCH 25
7:00 and 9:05 p.m. - Cinema
Guild will present Dean Cocteau's
"Les Parents Terribles (The Storm
Within)" in the Architecture Aud.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present the University Jazz
Band, directed by Bruce Fisher, in
Hill Aud.

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3

POSITION OPENINGS:
Connecticut Mutual Life Inscurance
Co., Southfield, Mich.-Sales Mgmt.
Trng. Program, advance in three ave-
nues, Agent, Supervision, or Home Of-
fice. 3 yr. program starting June and
IFeb. Degree in any field, up to 5 yrs.
out of college, men.
Winnetka Community House, Win-
Ii .

}

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For the Unique in
Spring Fashions

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"This Jesus hath God
raised up, whereof we all
are witnesses."
Acts 2:32
CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

..

_ _ .d

CHRIST IN THE CONCRETE CITY
A modern enactment of
The Passion
PRESENTED BY THE DRAMA GROUP

4)

I

FIRST PRESBYTERIA

GOOD FRIDAY
8:00-9:00 P.M.

N CHURCH
Admission FREE
1452 Washtenaw

TdCo
STATE and LIBERTY

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n

9:30 'til 5:30

S

. ...... ".ROM $1i:.

SESQUICENTENNIAL
PURIM 1967-5727
Hillel Experimental Debates
Program No. 10
Sunday, March 26 at 7:30
"SINS OF THE HAMANTASCHEN
VS.
FLAMING LATKES"

- t
Here-te season's
fashion news.
Little heel, lots of style. That's
Lora teen, a ghillie-tie with the
about-town look. Tyiiical of
our new collection of.Hush
Puppies0 casuals. And they're
so lightweightyou'Ii feel posi-
tively barefoot. In softest
Breathin' Brushed Pigskin*
and teamed with color.
matched smooth leather.
Come see this and many other
fashion looks in Hush
Puppies0. $1300
'.~ -~w-1

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,*

THURSDAY, MARCH 23rd-9 A.M.-10 A.M.-Dr. Joel Isaacson,
Professor of History of Art, Lydio Mendelssohn Theatre. speaking o
"HOW SOCIAL CHANGE'IS REFLECTED IN ART",
2 P.M.-3 P.M.-Dr. Henry Aiken, Professor of Philosophy, Brandeis,
Angell Hall Aud. A
"PHILOSOPHY IN A SOCIETY IN TRANSITION"
FRIDAY, MARCH 24th-10 A.M.-I 1 A.M.-Senator Edmund Muskie,

The Sesquicentennial Conference Committee would like to
announce that the following sessions are open to the public.

A

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SINNERS
PETER M. BAULAND
English

FLAMERS
MARVIN BRANDWIN
Psychology

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