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January 11, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-11

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 196:

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 11, 1067 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

" nv+: .mot, r c:r

M

Runs

'Afoul'

at

Wisconsin,

By CLARK NORTON
Special To The Daily
MADISON - Nobody has ever
accused Joe Franklin of being
Superman. Not even Captain Nice.
But after leading the Wisconsin
Badgers past Michigan last night,
98-90, the 6'4", 165-pound forward
may have skipped the locker room
and changed clothes in a tele-
4 phone booth.
While popping in 27 points, high'
for both teams. Franklin proved
to everyone that he could leap tall
buildings in a single bound. But
he preferred to pull down 15 re-
bounds and the Wolverines'
chances of a repeat title.
Franklin's greatest contribution,
however, may have been his own
gluttonal tendencies for punish-
ment. Constantly driving in for
the basket, "Spider" managed to
draw enough hacks from the op-
osition to help four Michigan
cagers foul out.
From Charity Stripe
Franklin was allowed 19 free
chances and connected on 13.
Jim Pitts, Dave McClellan, Den-
nis Bankey and Bob Sullivan all
were casualties of the referee's
whistle-the first time all season
the 'Wolverines have been in
trouble.
Yet the foul situation was prob-
ably more indicative of a hard-
fought battle than a hit-and-run
attack. Even before the game be-
gan, the Wolverines spotted the
Badgers one man when starting
forward Dennis Stewart was de-
clared temporarily ineligible.
However, Michigan coach Dave
Strack was confident that Michi-
gan's leading scorer would be
available soon.
McClellan In
"But Stewart's absence wasn't
necessarily the major factor in
our defeat," Strack grimaced.
"McClellan subbed for Stewart
and played an excellent game .. .
and we probably showed our best
team effort all season.''
From the opening tip, the teams
see-sawed back and forth. Sulli-
van grabbed the ball from Dill
and the Wisconsin native gave
thee Wolverines a 2-0 lead with
a 20-foot jumper with only seven
seconds gone.
Both teams appeared tense,
however, and were cold during the
first five minutes of play. After
missing three straight free throws
at the beginning of the game,
Franklin finally notched one to
break the ice for the Badgers.
Badgers Break Tie
Wisconsin broke a 23-23 tie with
eight minutes to go in the half

and, when Franklin tipped in a
rebound moments later, it gained
the five-point edge it controlled
until intermission. The half ended,
49-44, with Franklin canning 21
points on a variety of tip-ins and
soft turn-around jump shots.
Bankey, taking long shots that
he seldom attempts and driving
effectively past slow Badger guard
Jim McCallum, led the Wolverines
at halftime with 11 points.
Pitts, although he gained his
fourth foul with five minutes to
go in the half, and was replaced
by Willie Edwards, still led the

Wolverines with six rebounds.
Michigan switched to a zone de-
fense at the beginning of the sec-
and half after using the man-to-
man in the first 20 minutes. "We
thought that the zone would help
gain momentum and help protect
Pitts from picking up a fifth foul,"
explained Strack.
Led by Pitts' aggressive of-
fensive display under the basket
and Dill's outside shooting, Mich-
igan finally moved ahead of Wis-
c6nsin, 55-54, with 13 minutes left
on a Pitts' jumper.

But the junior guard was cred-
idet with his fifth foul only two
minutes later after cramming in
18 points and grabbing eight re-
bounds, trying for the team high
in backboard snatches with Dill,
McClellan and Sullivan.
Sullivan Drives In
The teams traded baskets for
several minutes as Sullivan time
after time drove in from the top of
the key to convert his spectacular
lay-ups. However, Franklin and
teammates Chuck Nagle and Mc-
Callum offset Sullivan's two-?
pointers and Dill's steady free-
throw shooting.
McCallum picked up 17 points
in the second half but arroused
Wisconsin coach Johnny Erick-
son's ire by "jumping higher on
offense than on defense." Streak-
ing Ken Maxey and Bankey made
McCallum appear cemented to
the floor.
The Wolverines never had bet-
ter than a two-point edge and led
for the last time with 3:30 left
on the scoreboard, 87-86, when
Sullivan dropped in one out of
two at the charity stripe.
Franklin Again
The margin was short-lived,
however, as Franklin went one
better by sinking two free throws
eight seconds later. In the process,
McClellan became the second
Wolverine to foul out.
A minute later, Sullivan gained
his fourth and fifth fouls and
Bankey followed suit seconds
later. Michigan's bench was nearly
emptied as Strack had to go with
four substitutes.
Wisconsin, employing an effect-
ive stal in the last minute of play,
increased the final margin to
eight points by getting Franklin
open under the basket twice.
Erickson concurred with Strack
that both teams exhibited their
best performance to date. "I no-
ticed that Michigan played much
better than in Los Angeles. How-
ever, with so many fouls called,
neither team could really play
their own game," explained Erick-
son. "We couldn't run our defenses
or work our plays."
Michigan players were whistled
down 29 times, while the Badgers
were caught 23 times.

Strack was dismayed at the loss I to "mix" with the Wolverines.
of Pitts so early in the game but Eino and the other Badgers
maintained that no one factor start final exams this Friday but
could be singled out in the upset.
"We didn't let the foul situation as far as Erickson concerned,
effect us so mucn that it inter- they've already passed one of
fered with our offensive strategy. ther toughest tests this term. Wis-
Wisconsin was able to rebound consin is 2-1 in the Big Ten.
with the Wolverines even though Defending champion Michigan
Erickson kept 71" Eino Hendrick- is 0-2, however, and must still find
son on the bench. Hendrickson a way to combat other self-styled
prefers chemical engineering to Supermen if it expects to make
basketball and was not trusted' to four in a row.
Wolverines Creamed in Dairy State
MICHIGAN WISCONSIN
G F P TG F R P T
G F 1 P T Nagle. f 7-21 8-11 10 3 22
Sullivan, f 6-12 8-9 8 5 20 Franklin, f 7-13 13-19 15 4 27
McClellan, f 5-9 1-1 8 5 11 J. Johnson, c 4-12 0-0 7 5 8
Dill, c 7-18 10-13 8 3 24 McCallum, g 12-23 2-3 6 2 26
BneMitchell, g 2-6 2-2 1 3 6
Bankey, g 4-10 4-7 3 5 12 Voigt. c 2-3 1-2 1 5 5
r Pitts, g 8-11 2-68 5 18 Carlin, g 0-2 0-0 1 1 0
Maxey, g 2-5 1-2 4 3 5 R. Johnson, f 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Edwards, c 0-2 0-0 2 2 0 Schell, 1f1-2 2-2 0 0 4
Maundrell, g 0-1 0-0 0 1 0 Sweeny, g 0-0 0-1 0 0 0
Delzer, f 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 Totals 35-82 28-41 55 23 98
Montross, c 0-0 0-0 0 0 0 MICHIGAN 44 46--90
Totals 32-68 26-38 48 29 90 WISCONSIN 49 49-98
I'; i

11

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
MICHIGAN'S BOB SULLIVAN goes in for an easy lay-up against
Northwestern in last Saturday's Big Ten opener in Yost Field-
house as Wildcat Jim Cummins (32) and Ron Kozlicki (43) look
on. Sullivan scored 20 points against Wisconsin in the Wolverines'
98-90 loss last night.

I

i

Big Ten Standings
Conference

1'

IN BIG TEN PLAY:
'Cats whip Illini ,104-96

L

Northwestern
Iowa
Michigan. State
Ohio State
Wisconsin
Indiana
Illinois
Purdue
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

W
2
1
1
1
2
1
1
0
0
0o

L
0
0
0
0
1
1
2
1
1
2

Pet.
1.000
1.000
1.000
1.000
.667
.500
.333
.000
.000
.000

SCORES

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
LATE MONDAY NIGHT RESULTS,
UCLA 83, Washington 68
Washington St. 76, So. California 74
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 62, Dayton 49
Duke 85, Clemson 61,
Miami (Fla) 111, Oklahoma City 109
Texas 82, Southern Methodist 73
Kansas State 75, Missouri 65.
Davidson 76, The Citadel 72
Furman 69, Georgia Tech 68 (ovt)
St. Louis 84, Creighton 79
Boston College 54, Northeastern 47
Holy Cross 74, Rhode Island 66
Bowling Green 76, Kent State 68

LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Wisconsin 98, MICHIGAN 90
Northwestern 104, Illinois 96
SATURDAY'S GAMES
MICHIGAN at Illinois
Indiana at Ohio State
Iowa at Michigan State
Purdue at Minnesota
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL LEVIS.

By The Associated Press
EVANSTON, Ill.-Northwestern
vaulted into the Big Ten basket-
ball lead with a 104-96 victory
over a battling Illinois team last
night.
The Wildcats, streaking to a
49,42 halftime lead, saw their lead
slip in the second, half when
sharp-shooting guard Jim Dawson
saught fire and poured through 13
of his game-leading 29 points in
the last eight minutes.
The Illini, suffering their sec-
ond loss in three league outings,
closed to within one point with a
minute and a half left only to
have a pair of free throws by
Northwestern Walt Tiberi and
baskets by Tiberi, Jim Cummins
and Jim Burns put the game out
of reach.

The victory was the second in
as many conference games for the
Wildcats and boosted them into
first place in Big Ten competion.
Burns once again paced the North-
western attack with 28 points
while Mike Weaver tallied 15,
Cummins 14 and Ron Kozlicki 13.

AP Top Ten

ENGINEERS AND METALLURGISTS:
Write your first name here.

1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.

UCLA 35
Louisville 1
New Mexico
Houston
North Carolina
Texas Western
Princeton
Kansas
Providence
Florida

9-0
13-0
11-1
11-1
11-1
10-2
11-1
10-2
9-3
8-2

359
324
227
203
201
164
115
101
46
31

... .

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