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March 19, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-19

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PAGE LPTGAT"

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 19# 1967

PAGE ETGHT THE 3IICHIGAI~ DAILY SUNDAY, MARCH 19, 1967
F

.._ .... .. _-. a. ______ . .e. # .. s

TRAVEL TO ITALY,NORWAY,ENGLAND:

Barnes, Michelsen and Thomas Win Fulbright Grants

By EDWARD MAHL
"I wish I were leaving tomorrow"
laments Prof. Samuel Barnes of
the political science department,
whose Fulbright grant will take
him to the University of Rome
next fall.
Claiming to have had enough of
Ann Arbor winters, Barnes is eag-
erly awaiting a return to Italy,
where he lectured on a similar
grant in 1962 at the University of
Florence.
"I regard my trip as a chal-
lenge," says Barnes, who will give
lectures in comparative govern-

ment and political systems.
The Fulbright grant will'
Barnes' transportation costs
the living expenses that he.
his family inctr for the year1
will be in Rome.

pay
and
and
they

The Fulbright program is ad-
ministered by the State Depart-
ment and operated in conjunction
with more than 130 foreign coun-
tries. It is an attempt to improve
American international relations
through cultural and educational
exchanges, says Barnes.
1The program is intended "to in-
crease mutual understanding be-
tween the peoples of the United
States and the people of other
TeleviSion
Highlights
SUNDAY, MARCH 19
1 p.m. - MEET THE PRESS.
Gen. Anastasio Somoza, president-
elect of Nicaragua will be inter-
viewed.-4
1:30 p.m.-ISSUES AND AN-
SWERS. Vice-President Hubert
Humphrey will be interviewed.-7
4 p.m.-"THIS IS MARSHALL
MeLUHAN: THE MEDIUM IS
THEMASSAGE." A closeup on the
controversial communications the-
grist.-4,
5 p.m.-ABC SCOPE. Sen. Ed-
ward Kennedy and Burke Marsh-
all will be interviewed about pro-
posed changes in the draft-7.
8 p.m. - ED SULLIVAN. The
Lovin'Spoonful will be featured.-
2
MONDAY, KARCH 20
11:30 p.m.-TONIGHT SHOW.
Comedian Woody Allen will be-
gin a one-week stint substituting
for vacationing Johnny Carson-4
TUESDAY, MARCH 21
10 p.m.-CBS NEWS SPECIAL.
Charles Collingwood will report on
an opinion poll gauging the atti-
tudes of the South Vietnamese on
American participation in the
war, the Viet Cong and Ho Chi
Minh-2.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 22
10 p.m. - CHAMPIONSHIP
BOXING. World heavyweight
champion Muhammad All will de-
fend his title in a scheduled 15-
round match with Zora Folley.-
2,13
FRIDAY, MARCH 24
8 p.m.-TIME TUNNEL. Tony
and Doug travel more than 6000
years into the future to save Ann
from kidnapprs.-7
9 p.m. - "LILIES OF THE
FIELD." Sidney Poitier and Lilia
Skala star in the Academy Award
film about an itinerant handyman
who becomes the answer to a group
of nuns prayers.-2
11:30 p.m. - "HARRY BLACK
AND THE TIGER." The famous
film story of lame Harry Black,
great wild animal hunter. Star-
ring Stewart Granger, Barbara
Rush.-2
SATURDAY, MARCH 25
2:30 a.m. - "APACHE WAR
SMOKE." A notorious bandit at-
tempts to rob his son's stage-
coach. Starring Robert Horton,
Gilbert Roland, Henry Morgan,
Gene Lockhart. Followed immedi-
ately by "You for Me," where a
pretty nurse attempts to gain
donations to her hospital. Starring
Peter Lawford and Gig Young.-2
MAKE PAY
WHILE TH
SIGN SHINES
on a summer job
A itE
MANOWER

We have muscle-building, bankroll-

countries . . .," "to strengthen the
ties which unite us with other na-
tions . .," and "to promote inter-
national cooperation for educa-
tional and cultural advancement."
Barnes found his earlier trip to
Italy on a Fulbright grant "inter-
esting" and "enjoyable." He has a
book being published this summer
based on a study, done there, of
the Italian Socialist Party.
From his first trip, Prof. Barnes
formed a high opinion of the Ful-
bright program. Although he be-
lieves it could be somewhat ex-
panded, he considers it adequate
in its present form, and quite suc-
cessful.
"It provides a legitimacy not
possible under other programs. It
creates an institutional basis that
facilitates research, and because
trust and cooperation are so im-
portant, this is perhaps even more
significant following the recent
CIA disclosures.
"It also facilitates a coopera-
tion in research and a mutual
exchange of ideas with foreign
scholars that helpsavoid the charge
of exploitation sometimes made
againstaAmerican scholars who
take data out of a country with-
out contributing to its academic
and scientific community.",
Barnes is presently serving his
tenth year as a member of the
University faculty. He is also the
possessor of a deep, forceful voice
that you somehow know keeps
students awake during long lec-
tures about why people liked
Wendel Willkie so much. Prof.
Barnes has one additional quali-
fication: he doesn't like Michigan
weather.

By DAVID LLOYD
Prof. Finn C. Michelsen, an ex-
pert in naval architecture and de-
sign, will return to his native
Scandinavia next year to lecture
at the Technical University in
Copenhagen on a Fulbright grant.
Michelsen came to the Univer-
sity as a transfer student from a
Norwegian technical school in
1947. After obtaining his degree,
he returned to Norway. He cross-
ed the Atlantic again in 1952,
and was appointed to the facul-
ty here in 1953. Because the field
of naval architecture is relative-
ly small, Michelsen has maintain-
ed acquaintances in Europe over
the years. He hopes to renew
these during his stay in 1968.
While in Europe he plans to
discuss with his colleagues some
of the contemporary problems
which confront the naval archi-
tect today. "A tremendous amount
of research has been done in this
field since World War II, be-
cause of the increasing demand
for efficiency and the vast in-
crease in the size of ships," Mich-
elsen said.
As in other industries automa-
tion is silently creeping in, he said.
He pointed out that sometime in
the future an automatic pilot may
be used to guide the ship to its
moorings. In the meantime,
"steadily improved working tools
are being developed," he said.
Another example of research in
this field is predicting the effect
of waves on the structure of a
ship. Michelsen indicated that new
concepts of cargo handling in
transport are revolutionizing sea
transportation.
Though the grant covers only

his lecturing in Copenhagen, Mich-
elsen plans ; to travel extensively
during the summer of 1968. He
hopes to go on a lecture tour
through Great Britain, France, the
Netherlands and Germany, as well
as the Scandinavian countries.
He also is interested in the type
of research being done in Europe
in naval architecture, especially
in structural design and hydrody-
namics. He hopes to visit other
laboratories. and do some research
on his own while in Europe.
The purpose of the Fulbright
program, Michelsen said, is "to in-
crease mutual understanding be-
tween the peoples of the United
States and the peoples of Den-
mark through the exchange of stu-
dents, teachers, lecturers and re-
search scholars." But he emphasiz-
ed that under the Fulbright plan
one does not represent the United
States in any official capacity
abroad.

By JENNY STILLER
Edwin J. Thomas, professor of
social work and of psychology, will
lecture and conduct research at
the University of Bradford, Brad-
ford, England, next year under
the Fulbright grant program.
Thomas, who has been on the
Michigan faculty since 1956, will
concern himself chifely with socio-
behavioral theory, an approach to
behavioral change developed chief-
ly by Thomas and his colleagues
at the School of Social Work.
The theory is "an approach to
behavior change based upon em-
pirical corroborated generaliza-
tions," Thomas explained. "An-
other feature of the approach is
its concern with knowledge which
may be made concretely opera-
tional." He added that the ap-
proach includes behavior modifica-
tion as it is employed in certain
branches of clinical psychology.
Professor Thomas's award will

2

r

enable him both to lecture and to
work with patients, and to perform
laboratory experiments if he
wishes. In addition, he plans to
work on a book on the subject
of socio-behavioral theory.
Thomas received his M.S.W. de-
gree from Wayne State Univer-
sity and a doctorate in social psy-
chology from the University of
Michigan.

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Join The Daily Sports Staff

4

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Freshmen-
DON'T LET YOUR FRIENDS
JAG YOU FOR BEING A
FIRST-YEAR ROOKY!
THINK SOPHOMORE

0

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UNION-LEAGUE

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announces
UNION-LEAGUE
MASS MEETING
for Soph Show
Central Committee
7:00 Sunday, March 19
Michigan Room-2nd Floor League
Petitioning will begin Sunday
for the following committee positions:
Director Publicity
Productions Choreography

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44

WILDL

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Iv

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>1<\I I
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' ) *~
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t

Gater your

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summer wardrobe at
~~ WILD'SA
State Street on the Campus
Center it around a suit by
MadiSONAIRE
YOUR SIGN OF AUTHENTIC
NATURAL SHOULDER FASHIONS

14

Time to start putting together a summer
wardrobe to look your best wherever you
go. Start with a Madisonaire suit. of

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