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March 16, 1967 - Image 9

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-16

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THURSDAY, MARCH 16, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY
Fuller Twins Lead Gymnasts, Cheers

PAGE NWINEJ

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By ANDY BARBAS
Who was the most tried when
Michigan beat Minnesota 49-0 in
football last fall? Was it the
players?
One group of individuals who
must definitely be considered is
the Michigan cheerleading team.
The cheerleaders execute a flip
for each point the team scores. In
the course of the afternoon, they
did nearly 200 flips . . . flipping
for joy after each touchdown.
Two of these acrobatic unfor-
tunates were the Wolverines' gym-
nastic twins, Chip and Phip Fuller.
Phip is also captain of the cheer-
leaders, who rout at the Wolver-
ine football and basketball con-
tests.
Even though their cheering does
take a lot of effort, "it does," as
Phip says, "keep up in condition
for our more important occupa-
tion, gymnastics." The twins have
established themselves as out-
standing competitors in the free

exercise, and Chip in the vault-
ing.
Last year Phip placed fourth
in the NCAA title meet while Chip
placed in both the free exercise
and vaulting. This year Chip
placed second in vaulting in the
Big Ten meet, and the brothers
tied for third in the floor ex-
ercise.
This weekend they compete in
the NCAA regionals in Wheaton,
Ill. Chip feels that, "if the team
can get up for the meet, we have
a good chance of taking it."
He then added, "the team that
wins the regionals will almost cer-
tainly win the nationals, because
all of the top team in the nation,
Michigan, Iowa, Southern Illinois,
and Michigan State, are in our
region."
The twins first became acquaint-
ed with gymnastics when they
were eleven. They took up tram-
polining as a diversion from
school. Their coach, a former

Olympic champion, then interest-
ed them in other events.
During high school they both
competed all-around, rather than
specializing in any one event. One
reason for this is the lack of high
school competition in gymnastics
in their home state of Florida.
Most of the meets in the area
were invitational and the Fullers
often had to travel to other states
in order to compete. They were
further hampered because there
was no organized state competi-
tion nor even any state champion-
ships.
The twins' decision to come to
Ann Arbor was rather easy. As
they pointed out, "Michigan was
the only school which offered a
top-ranking gymnastic team, and
guess what else-high scholastic
standards." Before they even look-
ed into colleges, the twins had
decided that they wanted to go
to the same school.#
At Michigan, Chip is majoring

in engineering and math, while
Phip is majoring in speech in the
lit school. Chip still has another
year to go before he graduates
because he's in a five-year pro-
gram, but he will still be ineligible
for gymnastics competition. "It
should be pretty hard to be here
anly be able to watch the team,"
Chip felt.
Chip and Phip, like most col-
legiate gymnasts, changed from
all-around competiton and began
to specialize in college. Even
though the twins favored the high
bar, they both decided to concen-1
trate on the free exercise and Chip
in vaulting as well.
This occurred because Michigan,
under the direction of coach Newt'
Loken, had an especially strong
high bar team when the twins
arrived in Ann Arbor and they
were able to help the team more
in the other events.
Mostly the Same
While the twins are very sim-
ilar in most respects, their styles
in competition are rather differ-
ent. Chip has a more exciting style
in that he uses all of the space in
the free exercise and it seems at
times as if he will almost surely
step over the sidelines.
Phip, on the other hand, has a
much more fluid and graceful
style. Phip has presently estab-
lished himself as the nation's, sec-
ond-best competitor in the free
exercise with a 9.35 average. He

ranks behind Toby Towson of
Michigan State and will challenge
Towson for the title in Wheaton.
Both of the twins have develop-
ed unique routines. As Coach
Loken explained, "Chip does a
forward one and three-quarter
somersault to forward roll which
has never been executed in this
country, while Phip has perfected
a breath-taking manuever on
floor exercise consisting of a back
somersault with a full twist, land-
ing not on his feet but instead in
a full split position on the floor
pad."
Score
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Washington 2, Atlanta 1
Cincinnati 11, New York (N) 6
Houston 4, Detroit 3
St. Louis 5, Los Angeles 2
Minnesota 14, Philadelphia 1
Chicago (A) 4, Pittsburgh 1
Baltimore 11, Kansas City 4
New York (A) 6, Boston 3
Chicago (N) 3, California 2
San Francisco 3, Cleveland 2 (10 inn)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NCAA College Division
Quarterfinals
Southwest Missouri 86, Valparaiso 72
NAIA Second Round
Oklahoma Baptist 70, Valdosta (Ga)
State 62
St. Benedict's 67, Southern State
(Ark) 56
St. Mary's (Tex) 55, Westminster
(Pa) College 53
NHL
Chicago 3, New York I
Montreal11,Boston 2
Detroit 4, Toronto 2

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Time was when summer study
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HOWEVER
Time now is when summer study
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The in students are finding
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Study this summer at the school
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Write today for your Summer
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MARQUETTE
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Dept. CU 4 1131 W. Wisc. Ave.
Milwaukee, Wis. 53233

I

WORSHIP ON
PALM SUNDAY

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
State and Huron Streets
ENCOUNTER WITH DEATH
Sermon by Hoover Rupert
9:00 and 11:15 A.M.

smUm

- Immmmm

q

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hJ.s gives
a ik ."i

tradition
Ithe pants

"EXPLORATIONS"
An opportunity for all interested students to share,
clarify, and explore with others their problems and
perplexities, ideas and questions, feelings and con-
cerns regarding any aspect of life.
TONIGHT-7:30 P.M.-GUILD HOUSE, 802 Monroe St.

Phip... or is it Chip... Fuller Caught Doing the Splits

Sponsored by:
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The Office of Religious Affairs
764-7442

CLARK NORTON
The Trials and Tribulations
--
Of Selecting a Column Title
Or ... How To Avoid Something
Innocuous Like Your Own Name
"What's in a name?" Shakespeare eloquently queried, offering
as evidence the irrelevant triviality that roses smell nice even if you
mistake them for ragweed.
The Bard has simply blown his cool. What would have happened
to Tony Curtis' career if he'd kept the name Bernie Schwartz Or
Cary Grant /if he'd stuck with the parental appelation Archibald
Leech? Can you see Sophia Loren kissing an Archibald Leech?
And would Lieutenant Staudenmeier have given a second thought
to a flick entitled "Luke-warm Creatures"?
Madison Avenue is not to be denied. Which would you rather
buy if you were throwing a party, 'Four Roses' or Four Ragweeds?
And who would ever fight "The War of the Ragweed"? Gypsy
Ragweed Lee probably wouldn't even fill the house.
Sportswriters have the same problem as movie stars. The most
traumatic part about writing a column is thinking up a name for
it in the first place. You can't just call it "The World of Sports."
Some wise-guy will immediately ask you whether sports are round or
pear-shaped.
You can try to come up with a pun on your own name, but some
names just aren't suited for the task. That's why you don't see many
Albanian sportswriters. What can you rhyme with Kzerkovich that
has anything to do with sports? What can you rhyme with Kzerko-
vich that has anything to do with anything?
If you think "Striking Out" (note the clever duel meaning)
is innocuous, put yourself in my position. I could have called my
column "Nort's Sports Shorts," "Sportin' With Norton," or
"Clark's Larks."
My fellow senior editors could also have had a punny time.
Grayle Howlett could have selected "Holy Grayle!," Bob McFarland,
who has specialized in track coverage, might easily have decided
upon "On Track With Mac," and Rick Stern could have chosen "Rick
Astern," as long as he wouldn't get carried away and stick Lawrence
Welk's picture up in the corner.
But I guess none of us thought we could emulate some of the
professional sportswriters who have tried the same thing. New Yorker
Dick Young, for instance, spews forth "Young Ideas." Bob Addie of
the Washington Post uses "Bob Addie's Atoms." And Jim Taylor, who
formerly worked for the Toledo Blade, composed "Taylor-ed Topics."
If you can't come up with a pun quite as nauseating as any
of these three, there is another way to utilize your name in the
title. That is to simply call your column your name and leave it
at that. With Jim Murray and Joe Falls.it's all right. But if your
name's John Smith, too many people might mistake your column
for a sample income tax form.
Which all leads up to why I picked "Striking Out."
I must confess I really don't know.
Maybe it's because nobody could stomach "Clark Bars" at 7:00
in the morning.
{ .:" ...'y%""::':i? .ti..;.::4":"'':::. i:........................°:"i":":t:{4?'r:vi'r}:r::.{..}:....":"b:v: ' ..............:"h::i'v:}}~i:::

'M' Netmen
Face Miami
Tomorrow%
ThenMichigan tennis team,
spending the week in Florida,
starts off the season with matches
tomorrow and Friday against
Miami.
Bill Murphy's defending Big Ten
champions (as they have been
nine of the past 12 years), ,Are
faced with an awesome assignment
as the Hurricanes, third in the
nation last year, have had sun-
shine and outdoor courts to prac-
tice on all winter.
Michigan isn't entirely defense-
less, however. It's true Karl Hed-
rick, last year's Doc Losh award
winner, has graduated along with
Jim Swift and Bill Dixon. But
Captain Jerry Stewart is a re-
turnee along with Ed White and
Ron Teeguarden. And an amazing
group of sophomores are ready to
fill in the gaps.
Start with Dick Dell of Mary-
land, brother of amateur standout
Donald Dell. Then add Pete Fish-
back, twice New York state high
school champion and Brian Mar-
cus, ranked number three in Mich-
igan two years ago.
Michigan's regular season starts
April 21, and Murphy believes that
the very early matches in Florida
will aid him in getting the team
ready.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
DOUG HELLER

... overcrowded pad, Dad?
... next time put your nesteggs
in Ann Arbor Bank. (one of our
four campus offices is nearby)
ANN ARBOR BANK
4 CAMPUS OFFICES
" East Liberty Street Near Maynard
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And 5 More Offices Serving
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E E UEITMORE AKE
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approach to world problems, and
the personal ones you might
have. Find out what you can
accomplish through an under-
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The book is SCIENCE AND
HEALTH WITH KEY TO THE
SCRIPTURES by Mary Baker Eddy.
Talk to the Christian Science
Organization about it. Someone
there will show you how to get
the full meaning out of this book.
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
ORGANIZATION
Time:
Thursdays, 7:30 P.M.
Place: 3545 S.A.B.
Science and Health is available on
loan at our meeting place....or at
$2.25 from the college bookstore.
If you wish, you can write for a free
pamphlet "The Time for Thinkers"
which is based on this book.
Address P.O. 66AAstor Station,
Boston, Massachusetts 02123.

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TU

YOUNG DEMOCRATS GENERAL MEETING

:. .... .. :.::.: .: ..... :.....:; :::
Engin11eers
Are you looking for a company that will recognize you as an
individual, provide you with a stimulating growth environ-
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For EE's and ME's with Graduate and Undergraduate De-
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We're a small company (1500 employees and $25 million in
sales), but we plan on getting much larger.
If you are interested in discussing a future with
us, a representative will be on campus March 21.
See your placement office for details.

II

r1 '
J*

The University of Michigan
CENTER FOR
CONTINUING EDUCATION
OF WOMEN
INVITES all women, returning women over 25,
part-time women students, and wives of stu-
dents, to the second in a series of four Discus-
sion / Coffees on "Women in School and at
Work."

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