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March 14, 1967 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-14

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Ct

TUESDAY, MARCH 14,1967

THE MICHIGA A- DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, MARCH 14,1967 THE MICHIGAN DULY

Inexperienced

M'

Nine

Heads

By BILL LEVIS
It can be called the year of
change or better still, the year of
the draft.'
Michigan's baseball team, pre-
paring to open its non-conference
season Saturday in Tucson, has
only three starters back from last
season, and two of those are set
to play different positions this
spring. The Wolverines lost last
season's catcher, shortstop, alter-
nate second baseman and one out-
fielder to graduation. They also
are being deprived of the services
of their top pitcher and center
fielder because of the confusing
' baseball draft.
The draft, in addition, claimed
a promising junior and freshman
while the college money-maker,
football, lured away the diamon-
men's probable first string catch-
er with spring practice.
Lots of Sophs
The Wolverines, under the di-
rection of Coach Moby Benedict,
have only nine returning letter-
men, five of whom are pitchers,
while the squad is laden with 11
sophomores. Michigan, which had
a 22-10 season and finished third
in the Big Ten last year with a
10-3 record behind NCAA cham-
pion' Ohio State and conference
runner-up Minnesota, looks for
the sophomores to fill the holes
created by graduation and the
draft.
Benedict lamented that "this
year's team is a great deal young-
er than last year, young and in-
experienced, but they all can play
and do a good Job."
Only senior Rick Sygar, who set
a Big Ten record with 24 straight
extra points in football last fall,
is set to start in the same position
that he occupied last spring, sec-
ond base. And it's a spot that he
shared with December graduate
and hockey All-American Mel
Wakabayashi. Les Tanona,. who
roamed in the outfield for two
years, brings his .330 batting aver-
age and varsity experience to
strengthen the infield."
Left Side
Benedict stated that the left
side of the diamond will tenta-
tively be manned by two sopho-
mores. Chuck Schmidt, who play-

KEITH SPICER

ed on the Detroit Favro team
that won the national champion-
ship in his age division last sum-
mer, is destined to take the vacan-
cy left by captain Bob Gilhooley,
who batted .292 for the Wolverines
last spring.
The hot corner, which was
guarded by Keith Spicer, since
switched to right field, is set to
be fielded by Glenn Redmon, who
hit over .330 for the Favro team
over the summer. Spicer has been
moved to the outfield to utilize
his fine arm, according to Bene-
dict.
Holding down the center field
job is junior letterman Andy Fish-
er, who saw action last spring as
an outfielder and pitcher. The
Michigan mentor explained that
Fisher is in center because "he has
the most experience in the out-
field, and besides he did a pretty
good job last year."
Early Departure
The junior fills a large hole left
by the departure of Dick Schryer,
who passed up his last year of
eligibility to play professional
baseball. Schryer was the third

leading hitter in the Big Ten last
season with a .358 average. The
senior, who was to have been this
year's captain, became the sec-
ond Michigan outfielder to sign
a major league contract in the
past two years. Carl Cmejrek, who
led the Big Ten in hitting as a
sophomore in 1965, signed with the
world champion Baltimore Orioles
more than a year ago.
The left field position, vacated
by graduated Al Bara who led the
Wolverines in hitting with an over-
all .348 batting average, is to be
manned by senior Dick Uhlmann.
Mixed
Pitching will have an almost
even mixture of experience and
youth for the Wolverines this sea-
son. Michigan lost its top man,
senior Bob Reed, to the Detroit
Tigers. Reed had a 9-4 record
last year and tied a Big Ten
record with six conference wins.
The Wolverines also lost junior
hurler Nick Radakovic to the
Houston Astros two weeks ago.
The moundmen will, however,
have a good nucleus returning.
Junior Geoff Zahn is "one of the
bell cows" of this year's staff
according to Benedict. He will
be backed up by letterman Jim
Lyijynen and Bill Zepp "who has
looked impressive so far this
spring." Sophomores to watch are
John Hurley and Dave Renkiewicz.
Pitchers Ahead
The pitchers have had the most
practice so far this year hurling
in Yost Field House since early
January. Only recently, the in-
fielders and outfielders have start-
Cagers Pick
Bankey MVP
Senior Co - Captain D e n n i s
Bankey was selected by his team-
mates yesterday as Most Valuable
Player on the 1966-67 Wolverine
basketball team.
Bankey thus becomes eligible for
the Silver Trophy, presented an-
nually by the Chicago Tribune to
the Most Valuable Player in the
Big Ten.
Coach Dave Strack also an-
nounced yesterday the names of
ten letter winners on the 1966-67
squad. The ten were seniors
Bankey, Craig Dill, and Marc Del-
zer; junior Jim Pitts; and sopho-
mores Bob Sullivan, Dave Mc-'
Clellan, Mike Maundrell, Willie
Edwards, Dennis Stewart, and Ken
Maxey.

ed to work out. Yesterday, the The Wolverines' catchers also
basketball floor was taken up but show the signs of inexperience
still this didn't help the diamond- this spring. Ted Sizemore, last
men since the area was taken over year's number one backstopper,
by the trackmen. The 10 games has graduated, and his backup
in Arizona over the next week man, Jim Berline, has passed up
should give Michigan the work baseball to concentrate on making
they need. the football team at offensive end.
Benedict noted that "we'll give Doug Nelson who saw limited ac-
all the boys a chance to play and tion at first base last year behind
pitch to see how they act under since graduated Chan Simonds,
fire." In Arizona, the Wolverines has been given the nod at the
will be facing squads that have first string catcher's spot with
played perhaps 20 games already sophomore John Kraft breathing
hi down his neck.

West
American pitcher Steve Arlin to
the Phillies, which gave him a re-
ported $100,000 bonus to pass up
his final year of competition. Just
about every team in the confer-
ence has been hit by the draft.
Still Benedict sees Ohio State and
Minnesota as the favorites again.
He noted, though, that "it's
hard to pick a favorite because
we don't know what sophomores
are coming up. Wejust don't have
any time to scout the teams."
As Benedict concluded, "It all
depends on the sophomores." He
should know, he has 11 of them.
FINAL 1960

TUESDAY, MARCH

14
UNION

8 P.M.

RM. 3R

Important-Everyone Come

tins spring.j
Michigan's inability to get into
shape under the field house roof
was evident last spring in Arizona
when Bob Gilhooley, who played
every game at short, was lucky to
get the ball across the field on
two bounces the last few games.
The soreness of the Wolverines
appeared midway through the
Southwest trip as theyrnosedived,
losing four out of the last five
games after winning the first sev-
en.
Students Meet
Faculty in IM's
Last night annual competition
between faculty departments and
students began at the IM Building.
In evening g a m e s scheduled
throughout the next two weeks,
students will contest teachers in
basketball and volleyball, as well
as handball, paddleball, squash,
badminton, tennis, bowling and
rifle shooting.
The first rounds of basketball
competition found five of the
seven scheduled games ending in
forfeit. Alpha Delta Phi and Sigma
Nu clinched victories over Systems
Engineering and Cooley Lab, re-
spectively, while Lambda Chi
Alpha, Alpha Sigma Phi, Theta
Delta Chi, Theta Chi, and Delta
Sigma Phi gained the easy wins.
The second seven-game round will
be played next week, while on
Wednesday and Thursday of this
week, 12 volleyball games will be
played.
In other intramural action; South
Quad's Gomburg House was sus-
pended from IM basketball com-
petition due to its B team players
being involved in "heated dis-
agreement" with officials. The de-
cision was announced after Gom-
burg won the championship Class
A Residence Hall Division game,
though the spat occurred in a
preliminary game.

In all, it looks like an interest-
ing year for the Big Ten, which
has been hit severely by the base-
ball draft. Ohio State has lost All-
Scores
NHL
No games scheduled
NBA
Cincinnati 113, Chicago 117
Detroit at San Francisco (inc)
Boston vs. St. Louis (inc)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
NIT
Southern Illinois 72, Duke 63
Marshall 119, Nebraska 88

Ohio State
Minnesota
MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Indiana
Illinois
Wisconsin
Iowa
Purdue
Northwestern

6
11
10
8
6
5
6
4
2
2

L
0
2
3
5
5
7
9
7
9
13

Pet.
1.000
.821
.769
.615
.615
.417
.400
.364
.208
.133

JOIN A WEEKEND PROJECT AT
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Friday night, March 17-Sunday noon, March 19
--an opportunity to developed a deeper
understanding of mental health while
serving patients on the wards.
All students are welcome to apply-
For information and applications, contact:
Miss Navyne Kline, 662-8351
or The Rev. Donald Postema, 668-7421
or Miss Shirley Lewis, 662-3580
Sponsored by the Ecumenical Campus Ministry

VOICE-SDS MEETING
TONIGHT

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BOB LEES

mm=NN -j

i-

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This Week in Sports
THURSDAY
Tennis-Michigan at University of Miami
FRIDAY
Tennis-Michigan at University of Miami
SATURDAY
Gymnastics-NCAA Regionals at Wheaton, Ill.
Baseball-Chapman College at Tucson
-Santa Clara, University at Tucson
MONDAY'
Baseball-Chapman College at Tucson
-Santa. Clara University at Tucson

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TUESDAY, March 14, 12:00 Noon
Subject:
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IN SOUTHEAST ASIA"

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At Mental Health Research Institute
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For reservations,
colt 662-5529

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