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January 10, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-10

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

TUESDAY, JANUARY 10, 1967 'tilE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

_____.___ __. .____ ., _ .,.......... ....... ...___ .._t...

Tankers Forcast Hoosier

Trouble

_. _ __.. _ .. -_ . _. . __ _M__-- _ _. _._ _ _ .

A
0OF CHICAGO

T it E

JEW 11 I S It

(' 4 IIM 1N I T

C E N T E Ri S

By KIM KENDALL
and CLARK NORTON
The P.A. system was so bad at
Saturday's Big Ten Swimming Re-
lays that swimming coach Gus
Stager had a hard time telling
who was winning until the meet
was almost over.
But a mechanical device can not
long rob the pleasure a coach
derives from watching his team
perform well.
If you can call finishing second
performing well.
Accordingly, Coach Stager had
niixed emotions about the results.
"Basically," he explained, "our
4' performance was spotty - some
were good, some were bad. We
could have done better in the re-
lays; when one boy falls behind,
he pulls the others down with
him. The biggest disappointment
was the freestyle. relays-all of
them. One or two performances
in each event were not quite up
to snuff."
Indications
Certainly, however, there were
encouraging moments. "Everything
else," Stager continued, "was more
than good. Generally, I was very
pleased."
One of the bright spots was the
showing of senior Russ Kingery
in the backstroke. Bettering his
personal record time by a second
and a half, the two-time NCAA
finalist was one of the meet's big
surprises.
The meet served a two-fold pur-
pose for Coach' Stager and his

results for the first time, and size two acute advantages may stop sophomores are an unknown
up what the future may hold in the Wolverines from upsetting quality; I don't know how they
terms of the team's chances. this tradition next Saturday when can do yet. However, our divers
The Minnesota affair also af- dove well and consistently."
forded Stager and his Big Ten they haad to Bloomington. "First The score said 125-1121, a sur-
counterparts the opportunity to of all, it is their pool, and second, prisingly narrow Hoosier victory
scrutinize each other's strengthshey have an advantage oveir us margin. Actually the numbers
and weaknesses for use in forth- in strength. Diving is their strong camaflouged the real story. Mich-
coming encounters. "I had a poit. Hoosier Olympian Ken igan returned first in the 300-yard
chance to see what I had." com- Sitzburger is the personification butterfly relay, yet had it not
mented Stager, "and how the of the thin margin Indiana holds been for a disqualification, In-
otherperformed; but so did In- o ct.the Wolverines in this r e diana would have grabbed the
diana."~sec. event. "The starter Jumped the
Never Been Beaten Still, Stager is confident. "It's gun," Stager smiled, "and it cost
The Hoosiers have yet to lose going to be a good season. The them nine more points."
a meet in their home pool and
THIS WEEK IN SPORTS

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FRIDAY
Hockey-Minnesota at Coliseum, 8 p.m.
Swimming-Michigan at Indiana
SATURDAY
Basketball-Michigan at Illinois
Hockey-Minnesota at Coliseum. 8 p.m.
Swimming-Michigan at Purdue
Wrestling-Northwestern at Yost Fieldhouse, 3 p.m.
Gymnastics-Michigan at Illinois

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on"

crew.
Coming before conference play
as it did, it gave each of the
coaches a chance to view practice

RUSS KINGERY

NCAA Punishes S.C.
For Rules Violations

f
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OUR REGULAR TOP QUALITY ICE CREAM. Made
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GET A
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- I-- : 1 - - .- .-A .. .. - - F . .1

HOUSTON, Tex. (AR) - Paul F. basketba1 player, wno was fir
Dietzel, once the coach of na- declared ineligible for competiti
tional championship caliber foot- by the Atlantic Coast Conferen
ball teams, faced severe National last year.
Collegiate Athletic Association re- Grosso was admitted to the un
strictions today in rebuilding the versity, although he reported
University of South Carolina's ath- failed to meet the regular pu
letic program. lished entrance requirements
The NCAA Council Sunday put South Carolina. This was one
South Carolina on probation for the citations brought forth by tl
two years, banned its football and NCAA Committee on Infractions.
basketball teams from post-season The NCAA also reprimand
competition and denied its parti- and censured Texas Western Co
cipation rights in the collegiate lege, last year's national colleg
body's lucrative television program, ate basketball champions, and r
The Council alleged the school moved Texas A & M Universi
violated NCAA principles govern- from probation.
Ing academic standards and fi-
nancial aid. It said four basketball ----
players and three football players SPRSNGTEIT :
were involved.SPRSNGTEIO
One of the principals involved in GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
the NCAA sanctions was believed,
to be Mike Grosso, outstanding -

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If you are interested in any of the above please call Mr. Ward D. Peterson, Director,
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Monday, January 16th or Tuesday, January 17th.

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