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March 11, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-11

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PACE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, MARCH 11, 1967

PAGE ~1X THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY. MARCH 11, 1967

Cagers End Disappointing

Season Against

Iowa

Ken Maxey:
'The Hustler'
ithout Cue
By HOWARD KOHN
He wasn't going to let it be that
easy, he decided.
It never is, of course, even on
the basketball court. Things are
always getting in the way.
And so he got in the way, zip-
ping in front of the charging
Butch Joyner with only 11 sec-
onds left in the game. Joyner, In-
diana's leading scorer, didn't see
him flash into position.
He crashed into him and Ken
Maxey crumpled before the tackle.
The official whistled and Michi-
gan had the ball. The Wolverines
kept 4t, however, no longer than
six' seconds and Indiana escaped
with a meager two-point win. It
was Monday night, two weeks
back.
Maxey walked carefully back to
the locker room. Easy? Hell!
But .
"It's my job. I'm supposed to
be fired up out there. I get to
watch enough when I'm on the
bench. When I get to play, I'm
going to make sure the other team
knows it."
Court Charge
Maxey is a ,5'9" dynamo ex-
ploding with spontaneous basket-
ball know-how, stabbing into the
path of everyone with the ball,
stealing, passing, driving, shooting.
It's what he wants.. It's what he
does instead of hunting pythons
in the jungle or wheeling for kicks
on asphalt. It's his answer to Wil-
liam Bolitho's query: "How can
they be compatible, the advent-
urer within us and the social man
we are obliged to be?"
It's not that basketball is a
world unto itself.
It just adds a fourth dimension.
"Ever since grade school, it's
been part of my life . . winter
and summer," Maxey admits.
The streets of Chicago, where

Bankey, Delzer: A Captain,
A Sub, and the Last Game

-Daily-Thomas R. Copi
KEN MAXEY, the little guy in the double fours, shows his hustle.
as he bustles around MSU's Vernon Johnson.

By JOEL RUBENSTEIN
"The obvious pitfall of our
basketball team is that they are
a bunch of girl-chasers. But not
Delzer and Bankey," laughed
Michigan cager Mike Maun-
drell.
"No, Sir! Marc Delzer devot-
edly watches game films every
Friday night before our games.
I would bring my mother up to
his room on Friday nights for
her to see a truly dedicated play-
er. And there would be Delzer
watching the films.
"And Bankey would be right
next to him threading the pro-
jector."
Dennis Bankey and Marc Delzer
are twofofmthe three graduating,
seniors from the group of athletes
that look like a living advertise-
ment Fruit-of-the-Loom for; that
is, the basketball team. Both are
guards slightly over six feet, of
quiet personality, and havedbeen
teammates, and close friends for
four years.
Contrast
But the similarity does not ex-
tend into their playing careers.
Bankey, a co-captain and start-
er, stands in sharp contrast to
Delzer, who has yet to start a
game, and has sat out mostcon-
tests during his three varsity
years.
"Sometimes when I'm sitting on

the super-charged sparkplug got
his first chance, abounded in
roughneck kids with energy to ex-
ploit in gutsy games.
Hoops Over Gridiron
"In many communities, there
isn't that much interest in recrea-
tion for kids. But I was lucky. The
Park District organized basketball
and baseball leagues for grade
schools all year round and for the
high school during the summer,"
he explains.
Football was so de-emphasized
that it was eliminated from the
high school sports curriculum. But
basketball and Chicago Carver hit
it off together like marble and
Michelangelo.
Carver's state championship in
Maxey's junior year was just an
encore for those in Cazzie Rus-
sell's preceding years.
"I have to give a lot of credit
to my coaches in both high school
and at Park District."
Larry Hawkins, Carver's bril-
liant coach, made it a point to
mold men as well as champion-
ships out of his players.
Maxey was active in extra-cur-

icular activities and graduated
near the top of his class. "Coach
Hawkins wanted us all to work at
everything we did. He made us,"
recalls Maxey.
The highlight of his prep career
was a trip to the 1964 Olympics
in Tokyo as a youth ambassador.
Six students from the Chicago
area were invited, on the basis of
academic and extra-curriculair
records.
After earning his degree at
Michigan, he plans to continue
with graduate school.
And after that?.
A coaching career? "It's a de-
finite possibility." The pros?
"Sure, I think about them but I'm
not kidding myself."
During the past three summers,
Maxey has worked for Chicago
Housing Authority in conjunction
with the Park District. "It's great
helping these kids find something
to do. I've seriously considered
making a career in the CHA."
Even when takes times out to
joke with his roommates, his un-
derlying demeanor is serious. But
if his personality is sublimated off
the court, it is extroverted on the
basketball floor.
"A small player has to always
hustle, always try to outthink the
other guy. And I fire up."
His trademark is the crowd-
pleasing move, the fake, the steal,
the fastbreak, the lay-up ... the
spectacle extraordinaire . . . Caz-
zie minus the dunk.
Possession of the ball is nine-
tenths of his strategy.
"Sure, I draw a lot of fouls. But
when you start wdrrying about it,
it slows up your game."
And Ken Maxey would just as
soon play through.-

the bench, I think about possibly
having gone to a smaller school,
and playing," Delzer pondered.
"But in the long run, it's not
that important . . . I guess."
Delzer, who had contemplated
attending Wisconsin, Marquette,
or Valparaiso after high school,
added that "I have no regrets.
"However, maybe Bankey and I
came here at an inopportune
time."
The chief creator of the "inop-
portune time" was Cazzie Russell,
the player who not only made
All-America, but who also made
many hopefuls remain on the
bench.
Defend
"When I was a freshman,"
Bankey reflected, "Coach Jorgen-
sen told me I must concentrate on
defense if I wanted to play. I
think that concentration might
have hurt my shooting."
The scoring prowess that has
suffered in his college career had
earned Bankey a 29-point average
in high school in Detroit.
"People tell me that I don't
shoot enough. I think I should take
a few more outside shots, but
that's something that's got to be
inside of you. Recently, though,
I've gained a lot more confidence.
I guess that's what it amounts to."
People may accuse Bankey of
shooting fright, but they can't be-
little his hustle and enthusiasm,
and above all, his superb defensive
play.
"Guards should be strong on de-
fense," emphasizes Coach Dave
Strack, "and Bankey is our best
defensively."
Defense Hurts
Teammate Delzer adds, "Bankey
was at a handicap at, the begin-
ning of this year. He was just out
there last year to play defense
(when Cazzie did the shooting).
"Now he's out there to play
both. But perpetual hustling on
defense hurts your offensive game.
It tires you out.
"You see a lot of real high-scor-
ing stars on the courts who can't
play defense well at all."
Marc Delzer, on the other hand,
is primarily an offensive player,
and consistently one of the high-
est scorers in intrasquad scrim-
mages.
Bankey expressed a captain's
outlook on his squad.
"The team has come around as
the teamwork has improved near
the end of the season. We're now
taking the good shots and making
the better passes.
"A lot of our troubles had to do
with inexperience. With eight
sophomores; there was little unity
left from previous years."
Disunity is a stronger deterrent
BillboardA
rar
The faculty - student athletic
series in a variety of sports
commences for another year on
Monday night with basketball
games at 5:15 and 6:00 in the
IM building.

Michigan: Frustration,
And a Chance for Glory
Michigan, already destined to last place in the Big Ten, closes
out its 1966-67 basketball season today against Iowa at 1:30 p.m. in
Yost Field House.
"Although it's been a disappointing season according to the
won-lost record, the team has played hard. There have been. weak
spots, of course, but they've done some things well," says head coach
Dave Strack judiciously.
"Last year when the team g." in trouble, Cazzie was there to
throw in a basket. But this year there's no one to throw one in
the last minute, no one to take charge. And a leader is a must
for a winning team because the rest of the players can 'be re-
laxed," says former head coach Bill Perigo objectively.
"It's been a year of trial and error, a year of trying to find
out who could play. We'll still be trying hard to win today for the
University of Michigan, but there's really not that much incentive
"Is it not strange that desire should so many
years outlive performance."
-William Shakespeare
left for the team," says sophomore guard Ken Maxey belatedly.
It's been a year where a lot of wrongs never quite added up
to a right.
A year of Michigan as the "born loser." A year when Dave Strack
would have won a season pass to Yost Field House in a Win-a-Trip-
to-Bermuda contest.
But even today, in a game as anti-climactic as the electoral
college, the Wolverines harbor hopes of a last-game upset.
"Why not?" asks Strack. "In the last three years when we've
been first we've lost the last game of the season. Maybe this year
the whole pattern will be changed."
Iowa is a notorious away-from-home1loser but Hawkeyes still
envision a last-minute Big Ten title share.
"It's probably pretty foolish. But there's always a chance In-
diana and Purdue will lose, so we're very much concerned with beat-
ing Michigan," explains Iowa coach Ralph Miller.
Iowa drubbed Michigan 91-81 at Iowa City earlier this year.
Miller's forte is a pressing defense based on the old psych principle
that idleness is the opponent's workshop. "We keep'em busy," he
admits.
Sam Williams, the junior transfer hotshot for the Hawks, is the
third leading scorer in the Big Ten. An explosive performance today
could give him an outside chance at the title.
On a day for outside chances.

DENNIS BANKEY

from winning than is excessive
girl-chasing.
The Tough Oiies
Michigan now stands, or lies,
at the bottom of the Big Ten with
two conference wins and 11 losses.
In the last four games which the
Wolverines have dropped, there
was a total margin of 12 points.
"When you lose by a 20- or 30-
point spread," laments Bankey,
''you tell yourself that you really
deserved it.
"But, boy, those last few!" he
groaned, with visions of. the drop-
ped pass or the last-second oppos-
ing basket obviously dancing in
his head.
Bankey then summed it up:
"A basketball team, more than
a football or baseball squad, has
got to get close. That takes time.
"You've got to learn how each
of the others lives and how he
thinks. In basketball, you must be
friends with all of them."
But for Michigan, the '67 sea-
son is almost gone.
For Michigan, the seniors, Del-
zer, Dill, and Bankey, are almost
gone.
For Michigan, everything is al-
most gone.
Everything but the future. z

.4
0'

I
7i
7

--HJK

The Lineups

A representative from the
Jervis B. Webb Company
will be on your campus
March 13, 1967
GRADUATING ENGINEERS; the opportunities are excellent for those
who desire a career in the Material Handling Industry, and are inter-
ested in diversification of training in all product areas from designing
to wherever your abilities carry you kn. this exciting industry.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER
-, ,

IOWA MICHIGAN
(10) Dick Agnew (6'-5/") F (20) Bob Sullivan (6'-6")
(11) Ron Norman (6'-3") F (42) Dave McClellan (6'-4")
(15) Huston Breedlove (6'-51") C ( 4) Craig Dill (6'-10"'
(23) Gerry Jones (6'-4") G (24) Jim Pitts (6'-3")
(24) Chris Philips (6-3") G (3) Dennis Bankey (6'-1")

STRUGGLE TO THE END:
Indiana, MSU Face Fight

MARC DELZER

k.4

19-YEAR-OLD STU DENTS
use
FCONO-CAR
for Transportation Specials

Phi Epsilon Pi
ALL-CAMPUS
OPEN HOUSE

Indiana and Michigan State are
favored to win today, but not by
all that much'.
The two teams, tied at 9-4 on
top of the league, take comfort in
their home-court advantage be-
cause that is about the only secur-
ity they will have when the; Hoos-
iers take on Purdue and North-
western invades East Lansing (on
channel 4 at 4 p.m.).
And waiting in the wings is Iowa
which will travel to Yost Field
House with the knowledge that if
they beat Michigan while Indiana
and MSU falter, the conference
will have a three-way tie, and
they will get the NCAA bid. This
is because they last went to the

tournament in 1956, while Indiana'
went last in 1958, and State in
1959.
Like Black and White
In their attempt to play the
spoiler's role, the Boilermakers
and Wildcats, despite identical 7-6
records, are a study in contrasts.
Purdue tended to alternate wins
with losses all season, until they
turned on in their last several
games. Meanwhile, Northwestern
has almost fallen apart, losing five
of their last seven, although they
were at one time favored to win
the league championship.
Both teams should be tough for
the defenses of the league leaders;
Purdue tops the conference in

field goal percentage with a .465,
while Northwestern leads team
scoring with 90.2 points per game.
Scrooge Moo-U
Meanwhile, Michigan State is
best defensively in the conference
with a 71.5 point-per-game allow-
ed average. And. their offensive
average has at last sneaked by the
defensive average, and is now at
71.9. The reason these two aver-
ages are still so close can be traced
back directly to the 81-59 pound-
in handed the Spartans by Mich-
igan in January. That game was
far and away the largest point
differential of the year between
State and its opponents.
The only other game today will
be Illinois at Wisconsin. Minnesota
and Ohio.State have already fin-
ished their schedules.

4+

SATURDAY, MARCH 1 1
1803 Washtenaw

438 W. Huron

663-2033

2-5 P.M.

-Iooooo~o~eooooloo~ooooofloOOOOOOOCO

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CI - - - - - - - - - - -l

TODAY
SATURDAY, MARCH 11
ALL LOVIN' SPOONFUL ALBUMS
DAYDREAM
DO YOU BELIEVE IN MAGIC?
WHAT'S UP TIGER LILY?
HUMS
and
BEST OF THE SPOONFUL!

TOMORROW
SUNDAY, MARCH 12
ANOTHER GREAT
MYSTERY SALE
AT THE "SOUTH U" STORE
FANTASTIC BARGAINS
ONE AFTERNOON ONLY
NOON TO SIX P.M.
STOP IN AND
S A VE_____________________________

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I

Big Ten Standings

I

Indiana
Michigan State
Iowa
Purdue
Wisconsin
Northwestern
Illinois
Ohio State
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

9
9
8
7
'7
6
6
5
2

L
4
5
6
6
6
7
8
9
11

Pet.
.692
.692
.615
.538
.538
.538
.462
.429
'357
.154

TODAY'S GAMES
Iowa at MICHIGAN
Northwestern at Michigan State
Purdue at Indiana
Illinois at Wisconsin

4

A

When You Must Keep Alert

1 1

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