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March 09, 1967 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-09

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TAE MICHIG~AN DAILY

THRSDAY, MARCH 9, 1967

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ASUC APPROPRIATES MONEY:
Berkeley Students Push for Extension

Addition to Grad Library'
To Ease Space Problem

Of Visiting Professor

(Continued from Page 1) occupying parts of the second,
s A pp on t 1mthird, and fourth floors, move intoi
provided by the addition. The their own faciilties.sn
present structure, originally de- Wagman indicated that changes
anthropology and religion, Beck- ditorium to hear Becker lecture, signed to hold 800,000 volumes, are being scheduled for other li-
ar'. nnrn~e Icto nf- RO t 1now holds over 1.4 million. In ad- braries in the system.including
~. ~ ~ V~U1 UV W itio thre re pprximtelyplas fr nw lbrym fainltesing

By CYNTHIA MILLS
Berkeley students are fighting
hard to retain Ernest Becker, a
popular visiting lecturer whose
contract has not been renewed as
a member of their teaching staff.
After the anthropology depart-
ment last week failed to ask Beck-
er to return next year at the end
of his one-year tenure, the Asso-
ciated Students of the University
of California (ASUC) decided to
finance him themselves. The ASUC
Senate last Wednesday voted ap-
proval of a $13,000 one-year ro-

tating, student-financed chair for
scholars, and last night they nom-
inated Becker to fill the position.
However, the anthropology de-
partment decided Monday they
would not give Becker a position,
even if financed by the ASUC. The
department claimed that they
could not create a position for an-
other tenured faculty member.
An ASUC spokesman said last
night, "we will, keep pressuring
the university until we can find a
department that will take Becker."
Currently teaching a course on

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fes. approac ap e ws nsrmn
ficiently interdisciplinary to al- participate in a teach-in spon- dition, there are approximately plans for new library facilities in
low a number of departments to sored by the Campus Friends of 400,000 volumes in storage in the the dental, public health, and ar-
consider him for a faculty posi- Ernest Becker. The teach-in evolv- North Campus Library Annex. The chitecture and design schools, and
tion. The ASUC intends to ap- ed around the issue of what could library must also find space for a large addition to the medical li-
proach the various departments. be done to retain Becker as a the more than 40.000 new Volumes brary. A large addition to the
"Becker is very reluctant to re- permanent faculty member. Later it adds each year. UGLI is also in the works for the
main as an ASUC consultant, with- that evening 150 students march- In a 1963 report,*Wagman pre- future.
out teaching an accredited course," ed to the chancellor's office to dicted that by 1975 the library sys- Wagman also revealed that the
the spokesman said. show the 2000 signatures they had tem would have to find space for overnight reserve system now in
Becker, a doctorate in cultural obtained on petitions advocating over 1.5 million new volumes, as use in the UGLI will be modified
anthropology, taught at a State Becker's retention. well as expanded reader space and for next year. All overnight books
University of New York for three William B. Boyd, vice-chancel- increased staff work area. will be put on closed reserve
years after serving as a staff mem- for of student affairs told them T h e Undergraduate Library, status, a change which will neces-
ber at the U.S. Embassy in Par- their "enthusiastic testimonial" constructed in 1958, provided a sitate rearrangements in equip-
is. He has four books to his cred- would be sent to the appropriate much-needed relief for the over- ment and higher cost.
it, including a study called "The department for further considera- worked General Library. With over Even with the new construction,
Revolution in Psychiatry," a pri- tion. Boyd said, however, that by two million visitors a year, more old problems will remain. As Wag-
mer on Zen, and a controversial long standing tradition; "faculty than twice as many as the Library man said. "Every time we improve
critique of U.S. education. members initiate appointments of Congress, the UGLI is now also service, we create new demands
He finds all of the efforts in using the procedures of the de- inadequate and overcrowded. That for more space, better service, and:
his behalf "very flattering," but partments.' situation will be somewhat relieved more books. We will not be able to
--y -w rn m~r + fro ,The creation of a student-sala- when the engineering-transporta- solve these problems, we can only

his. gives tEradition
a kick 1 the pants
1

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South.Carolina Students
FacePossible Expulsion

ORANGEBURG, S.C. (P)-Stu- they no longer exist," said Turner. has made no comment abtLte red faculty chair brought wide-tn d u i rd
dents at South Carolina State He said the earliest the three possible ramifications current ac-ar spread reaction from among mem- -
College received a stern ultimatum suspended students could re-enroll tivities may have on the future bers of the faculty. Several soco-
yesterday to end their classroom now is August. of his academic career. logy professors proposed the cre-
boycott by Friday or face expul- On March 2 the trustees had . Students sit in the aisles at ation of a department which A eross Cam pus
sion. served notice the college might be Becker lectures in a 900-seat au- would permit the kind of inter-
Gov. Robert. McNair met with closed unless the boycott ended, ditorium. Despite criticism that he disciplinary approach that Becker
members of the college's board of but college officials have put off is beginning to repeat himself in follows.
trustees and a statement'was is- a decision on closing. his ideas and publications, his Jan E. Dizard, acting assistant I THURSDAY, MARCH 9 4:10 p.m.-Richard Turner, a
sued notifying students they will Turner said about 20 per cent interdisciplinary approach to the professor of sociology, said that in 4:00 p.m.-Walter Goffart of the professor of Art Histoiy at Prince-
be called before the school's dis- of the 1,700 students at the social sciences which does not fit view of the stituation that has University of Toronto, will speak ton University, will discuss, "What
cipline committee unless they "re- Orangeburg institution showed up into any particular academic regi- enveloped Becker's tenure, the on 'What the End of the Euro- is Florentine about Florentine
sume and maintain normal class- for classes Wednesday. Student men is appreciated as an issue proposal of creation of a social pean Colonial Emoires may Teach Painting?" in Aud. B Angell Hall.
room attendance and college ac- leaders have claimed their boycott in itself. --science department should be se- us About Rome's End" in East 7:00 and 9:00 p.m.-The Ann
tivities" on Friday. . was 97 per cent effective. Last week, over 1000 students riously considered by the Board of Conference Room, Rackham Build- Arbor Film Festival will be held
The governor called the direc- The college suspended three packed Berkeley's Wheeler Au- Educational Development, ing. in the Architecture Aud.
tive "both lenient and fair." The students following demonstrations - __ ___ ___ ____
boycott of classes is a week old at the week before last on the cot
the predominantly Negro school. lege campus. The demonstrations:
In other developments earlier in protested campus dress and chapel
the day, leaders of the student attendance rules and also a deci-
boycott substituted a bus trip to sion by the college not to ask two
Columbia Saturday for a planned white instructors on one-year fel- l r
two-day, 42-mile hike to the cap- lowships to return next year.
Ital city. They want to visit Mc- - - --1ceriica~es of deposit
ftair. -
Before yesterday's directive or-
dering an end to the boycott, the U UUA h
college administration had made N-yot
several concessions to students on 6months od1dkear
grivance involving campus dress OF ER with wide-track stri
F Rancelinttennceam u sodr0 0 r oe Get the best of two worlds. The auth
The administration had refused, uninhibited look of boldstripes 65%
The dmiistatio ha reused SOlETUTER TUE-mnthat uninhibited stores. Press-Fre
however, a student demand that nSOVIET nlihEromSoitUpR o.Uin a nniie soe.mesF he upnddsuet e e tpi a n n fAn ro akshieatm tcal ee al
three sp en tudemnbe r- ly in English from Soviet Upion. Stop in at any one of Ann Arbor Bank's ninee
instated immediately. The college Entire June, 1967 issue devoted offices with your funds or bring your passbook -
did offer to permit readmission of to historic Russian tradition of from any other financial institution and AnnAVAIL
the students in June instead of in poetry. Featuring B. Pasternak, Arbor Bank will arrange the transfer of your EA
1970 or in August of this year- A. Voznesensky, E. Yevtushen- savings if you wish.
two previous deadlines. ko, O. Mandelshtom & others.
However, at a Columbia news One year subscription $2.50.
conference following the trustees Orders accepted until April 1 st. ebr*FdrlDpstIsrneCroai*FdrlRsreSse
meeting with the governor, college 311 S. Sta
President B. C. Turner said all Send to: Imported Pub. & Prod t
earlier concessions have now been i Union Square R-611 -_____
recinded because the students N.Y.C. 10003
"The offers were rejected and
'67
M Ui S K< E MT
MUSKET '67
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