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March 09, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'I

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY'

THURSDAY, MARCH 9, 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, MARCH 9,1967

FOLLOWS POLICY SPLIT:

Popularity of Labor Party

Tested

Senior Officers of University Activities Center
Announce the Appointment
of their Executive Council:

In Special Parliamentary Elections

LONDON (P-Is Prime Minister
Harold Wilson, the "master poli-
tician," losing his grip? Or has he
made a calculated move to force
the Labor party's rebellious left
wing into line?
Political quarters are asking
these questions in advance of a
crucial testing of the Labor gov-
ernment's popularity in special
elections in three widely sepa-
rated districts.
The polling in Glasgow, South
Wales and the industrial English
midlands will fill parliamentary
seats left vacant by death or res-
ignation.The midlands and South
Wales- are considered safe Labor
seats, but the Laborites are likely
to lose in Glasgow.
Overshadowing the electoral
question mark are queries raised
by the apparent disarray of Wil-

son's party in Parliament follow-
ing the almost unprecedented
tongue-lashing the prime minister
gave his followers last Thursday.
This came after 63 Laborite
legislators, by abstaining, refused
to support the government's de-
fense policy in a critical vote Tues-
day night. The government's theo-
retical majority of 95 votes in the
House of Commons fell to 39 amid
jubilant shouts of "resign, resign!"
from opposition Conservatives and
Liberals.
What stung most in Wilson's
tirade Thursday to a party caucus
was. his likening the abstainers to
dogs.
"Dog metaphors are usually a
mistake in democratic politics,"
the Times later commented.
Wilson told the abstainers: "All
I say is 'Watch it.' Every dog is.

alowed one bite, but a different
view is taken of a dog that goes
on biting all the time."
He threatened to dissolve' Par-
liament if the backbenchers con-
tinue opposing his government's
policy.
The Financial Times suggested
"the prime minister's savage re-
buke to his rebellious followers on
Thursday night was symptomatic
of the government's growing sen-
sitivity to criticism."
Of the 63 abstainers, 11 came
from the party's right wing and
center. The others were leftwing-
ers. Some wondered if Wilson was
reminding the leftist they have
nowhere to go if excluded by the
Laborites and that he can get
along very well without them.
Wilson's problem is that his ad-
ministration desperately needs a

foreign or domestic policy success.
Peace in Vietnam seems no closer;
the rebel Rhodesans are still in
power; the Common Market seems
just as firmly closed to British
entry. Britain's ardent support for
a projected American-Soviet trea-
ty to curb the spread of nuclear
weapons is embroiling her with
the French, Italians and West
Germans.
At home, improved exports have
been obscured by the continuing
rise in unemployment. The con-
tinuing economic crisis and heavy
defense spending has meant cur-
tailment of the party's cherished
social welfare program.
In Glasgow's Pollock District the
Laborites had a majority of 1,975
of 40,000 votes cast in the March
1966 national elections in a
straight fight with the Conserv-
atives.
This time Communist, Liberal
and Scottish nationalist candi-
dates are also entered, and the
Laborite vote is almost certain to
be split to give Prof. Esmond
Wright, 51, a Conservative, victory
over schoolteacher Richard Giles,
35, a laborite.

BUZ BARCLAY-University Services
JOE CALCATERRA-Public Relations
LEE MARY DAN I ELSON-Facilities

BOB NEFF-Research Advisory
FRAN O'DELL-Social
BER I NTH IA ROSENBERG-Personnel
CAROL SPENCELEY-Publications
DEN N IS WEBSTER-Comptroller
HOWIE WEINBLATT and
BONNIE YUJ U ICO-Homecoming

LARRY

DITCH-Academic Affairs

TOM LOVELL-Travel-I nternational
DAN McCREATH-Contemporary

Discussions

Proposal To Legalize" Abortion
Sparks Debate in State Senate

RICHARD FRIEDMAN and

BILL MORRILL-North Campus

KATHY

FORSYTH E-Soph Show

____________________ __ _ __'

LANSING OP)-A bill to legalize
abortion and sterilization under
certain conditions was introduced
in the Senate Tuesday and spark-
ed a 15-minute fight over which
conmittee should consider the.
measure.
Described as a "hot potato" by
its sponsor, the bill would permit
abortions in cases where the coun-
ty prosecutor and three physi-
cians recommended termination of
a pregnancy caused by rape or in-
cest.

The bill, introduced by Sen.
John McCauley (D-Wyandotte),
also would permit sterilization of
both men and women for reasons
of mental health or family eco-
nomic conditions.
The fight over committee refer-
ral broke out after the bill was
referred to the Senate Judiciary
Committee, headed by Sen. Rob-
ert L. Richardson, (R-Saginaw).
Richardson asked that the bill
be referred instead to the Com-

Schools, Industry Explore,
Laser Beam Uses, Hazards

mittee on Health, Retirement and
Social Services, adding that in
view of the amount of legislation
before his committee he doubted
if there would be time to give
McCauley's bill a hearing this
year.
Fellow Democrats rose to sup-
port the referral of McCauley's
bill to the Judiciary Committee
on the basis that several serious
legal concepts were involved that
could only be handled by that
committee.
Richardson denied Democratic
charges that he was trying to bury
the bill and said he could only
conclude that McCauley "is not
interested in having a hearing on
it.",
"I'm not trying to bury it,"
Richardson said. "I wanted to let
him know we're very busy in com-
mittee. It looks very doubtful that
we will be able to consider this
bill."
Sens. Lorraine Beebe (R-Dear-
born), head of the Health, Retire-
ment and Social Services Com-
mittee, and L. Harvey Lodge, (R-
Waterford), came to Richardson's
aid,' suggesting that the bill be
referred to their committees for
a hearing.
However, the Senate voted to
uphold the original referral and
the measure remained in the
Judiciary Committee.

Hathaway hits
a dissonant chord with

WASIIINGTON (AP) - Some'
danger signals are flashing in the
pathway of the laser, perhaps the
most powerful form of light in the
universe.
But the laser, developed only six
years ago, is already finding hun-
dreds of uses in industry, medi-
cine, military operations and space
flight.
Some of the problem areas:
-One scientist said treating
cancer with lasers might- cause
the cancer to spread. Another
scientist said he had treated 100
cancer cases and never seen such
"effects.
-Warnings of "instant blind-
nes" from looking directly at laser
beams. This might apply to high
school students using make-it,
yourself laser kits, or to soldiers
exposed to laser beams from ar-
tillery range-finders.
Some of the uses, present or
under study, range from tracking
satellites to helping lay sewer
pipes, from .removing warts and
tattoo marks to punching die
holes indiamonds and from de-
tecting art fraude to furnishing
artillerynrangedfingers more ac-
curate than radar.
Research and development em-
ploying lasers is going on in hun-
dreds of industrial laboratories,
universities and military installa-
tions throughout the country.
Lasers have become big business.

Estimates are that the sale of
lasers-from hand-held models to
60-foot-long monsters-will top
$150 million in 1967, and reach a
billion dollars by 1970. Present
prices range from about $100 for
a high school teaching model to
$5,000 and up for industry types.
The word laser - pronounced
"lay-zer"-is an acronym coming
from the first letters of. the phrase
"light amplification by stimulated
emission of radiation." In brief, a
laser is a device for generating
an intense nondiffusing beam of
visible or invisible light.

DISCOVER THE UNUSUAL
Q -Unique Jewelry from
Exotic Lands
-Earrings Our Specialty
J Pc-a-J ea
Plum Street 109 S. Fourth Ave.
Detroit Ann Arbor

.. __-_

MM1I

I

Gerry Mfulligain
Hathaway: Mr. Mulligan, what do
you think of our new Hathaway
Club shirts?
Mulligan: A shirt is a shirt is a shirt.
Hathaway: You don't like our hand-
turned soft roll collars, our single-
needle stitching, our lap seams?
Mulligan: Frankly, I prefer my
new saxophone. A beauty.
Gold-plated. Wonderful tone
Hathaway: Perhaps the tapered
waist would interest you?
Mulligan: Does it play well?
What's the tone quality like?
Hathaway: You're putting me on,
Mr. Mulligan.
Mulligan: Well, isn't that what you're
supposed to do with Hathaway
shirts?

ALL-CAMPUS MIXER
featuring
LONG ISLAND SOUND
Friday, March 10th-Union Ballroom
8:30-12:30 P.M.
Guys-50c

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