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March 07, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-03-07

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY MARCH 7, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY MARCH 7, 1967

'Half a Sixpence' Provides an
Evening of Fine Entertainment

Calls War on Poverty ORGANIZATION

Highly Successful

NOICE~S

By BETSY COHN
A whole evening of fun is found
in the tic-toe-fang bang-lively
rhythm of "Half A Sixpence," pre-
sented by the Professional Theatre
Program last evening.
The story of Arthur Kipps (Ken-
neth Nelson) is a tale which has
been often wagged. Poor boy
strikes it rich, leaps into luxury
as though it were a deep pool of
whipped cream, and finds instead
that he is but knee deep in acidic
unhappiness. Thus, he shuns the
"shams which money builds" and
returns to his old and happier way
of -life.
Staging, dancing, song and color
are the staples of this otherwise
sucrose offering. Kipps and his
three cohorts (Sean Allan, Terry
Lomax and Gene Foote) portray
their labors at the "Emporium"
(a drapery shop), by syncopated
satire. At the same time they are
mimicking the efficiency economy
and system of their mechanized,
Vand distinguishdely-wrinkled man-
ager, Mr. Shalford (Alex Reed)-
hrmphh.
During the day the young ap-
prentices are under the tyranny
and regiment of Shadford; at
night they seek their own diver-
sions. Kipps has fallen in love with
Ann (Linda Rae Hager) but the
young suiter can give his love no
more than a token-a half a six-
pence. He keeps half a sixpence ...
"and together they're one!"
However, money comes between
them, as he unexpectedly comes
into an inheritance. Ann is tem-
porarily snuffed out and replaced
by a huff and a puff of Helen
Walsingham (Marianne McAn-
drew). Kipps (now Cuips) becomes
the, wealthy Walsingham family
enterprise; their aim is to make
him into "a fitting gentleman"...
a perfect opportunity to interject
humorous' and extreme caricatures

of 19th century English aristoc-
racy. This is done through force,
with mastery and mimickry.
After turbulent and deceitful
circumstances, Kipps loses his for-
tune, but has his Ann. "I'd rather
be poor and happy" quips Kipps
and the audience swallows un-
explainable lumps as he and Ann
reunite.
The most fun of this production
is the marionette-type dancing
(thanks to the expert puepeteering
of choreographer Onna White).
The characters, the sund, the color
and music become one delightful

festival of folk ballet, vaudeville,
tap, tumbling, acrobatics; ... and
what is even more fun is the pastel
colored costumes.
The songs serve as an accom-
paniment to the dance and sta-
ging; they are cut, sometimes ap-
prpriate, but not substantial in
themselves. Kipps was a little too
strong, Ann a little too weak, and
the chorus was but a sidelight to
the dancing.
In essence, last' evening's per-
formance was a feast for sight
rather than sound . . . and a very
pleasant sight at that!

Legislature Seeks Control
At University of Wisconsin

By CAROLYN TOLL
Robert S. McNamara is not the
only one in his family involved in1
Washington politics. His wife,'
"Margie," is on the advisory coun-
cil to the Office of Economic Op-
portunity - by presidential ap-
pointment. In her speech to the,
Alumnae Council's 50th birthday
luncheon celebration in the League1
Ballroom last Friday, she defend-'
ed the poverty program at length.
The event was part of the opening
of the Sesquicentennial Celebra-
tion.
The vivacious Mrs. McNamara
expressed concern for the lack of
support of the Poverty Program to
a very affluent audience of:
alumnae, administrators, Regents,
local government officials, and
University P r e s i d e n t Harlan
Hatcher and his wife. Mrs. McNa-
mara spoke on the topic "The
Courage to Serve' the Responsi-
bility of the Educated Citizen."
"It seems to me that service in-
cludes service to government,"
Mrs. McNamara began, "and it
still seems incredible that we as
an 'affluent society' have not given
more support to the Poverty Pro-
gram. This program has made the,
idea of a national effort against
poverty a part of the American
scene," she told her audience.
Mrs. McNamara seemed to an-
ticipate criticisms of the program
by saying that OEO has no need
to apologize for itself, since "it
was never meant to be a complete
answer." What the program meant
to do, and has done, she feels, is
demonstrate how poverty could be
eradicated.
As for criticism of specific pro-

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officiallyj
grams under OEO, "we mainlyie and registered student orga-
hear of these things in a sensa- nizations only. Forms are available In
tional way," Mrs. McNamara cau- Room 1011 SAB
tioned. "There are 113 Job Corps Joint Judiciary Counci, Meeting
so if you hear of one with prob- wed., March 8, 6:30 p.m., 3540 SAB.
lems think of all the others that -
you haven't heard from," she U. of H. Rifle Club, All-campus shoot.-
ing match, Wed., March 8, 7 p.m.,
urged. "This program is a whole ROTC Rifle Range. $2 entry fee, six
lot vaster than we relaize. It took trophies.
the advisory council two whole Scottish Country Folk Dance Club,
days to understand everything Dancing, Wed., March 8, 8-10 p.m.,
that's going on," she added. Women's Athletic Bldg. Step instruc-
tion and practice, 8-8:30 smm.ionly.

It's Unequaled on the Screen
FOR FOUR
PERFORMANCES ONLY
March8 and 9
THE
11IKADO
TOMORROW & THURSDAY ONLY
admission $2.00 Phone 761-9700

(Continued from Page 1)
Presidential Special Assistant
Robert Tailor explained to The
Daily that the Cardinal, "unlike
your paper, is set up completely
indepedent of the university."
But legislators don't like this.
The recent paper pioneering, as
Editor Phyllis Rausman said, to
print what happens and the
truth," became a focal point for
legislative criticism. Commented
Alfonsi, "We don't feel the kind
of tripe they printed wasthe kind
of tripe students should read."
McKay called some of the Car-
dinal's reporting shocking, saying
it was for "no other purpose ex-
cept to maybe shock little old lad-
ies out of their tennis shoes."
Alfonsi said that Cardinal
caused excessive disturbance when
it recently printed commentary by
Dr. William Master, author of
"Human Sexual Response," and
for an editorial which advocated
the legalizing of marijuana.

Alfonsi contends, "From what
I've been reading they have no
moral standards."
McKay pointed out, however,
that the Daily Cardinal is just one
reason for the legislative action.
He sighted the fact that recent
studies disclosed that Badger sor-
orities and fraternities had had
clauses in their by-laws which
banned Negroes from possible
membership as another integral
factor for the study.
Demonstrations
Alfonsi added that the recent
disturbance and demonstration,
when Dow Chemical Co. inter-
viewed prospective employes on
the campus, caused much state-
wide concern. He described the in-
cident as "just too much for the
cooks to stomach."
According to McKay many
members of the legislature were
"very irrate" and that it became
his job "to see to it that the reso-
lution would not burn down the
campus."
Further action by the legisla-
ture awaits Harrington's report.

She called the Headstart pro-
gram one of the most successful
programs, but added that it had
to be followed up by the school
systems. The Community Action:
Program, she said, has had the
most difficulties because it in-
volved the most people, politics
and money, "but we've gone ahead
healping people solve their own
problems," Mrs. McNamara said
smiling. "This is where the action
is, on the local level," she added
with conviction.
The Secretary's attractive wife'
charmed the audience with her
liveliness: She spoke briefly to the
problem of communication be-
tween generations, and added that
she had been reading The Daily
before coming, to "take the tem-
perature of the campus." She sup-
ported the freedom of the paper
by quoting Thomas Jefferson: "He
was right when he said the press
has to be free, that authority and
the power that go with it carry
the dangers of excess. Debate is
essential," Mrs. McNamara con-
cluded.
Having been an Ann Arbor resi-
dent from 1949 until 1960, Mrs.
McNamara knew many of the
alumnae personally.

I

Deutscher Verein, Kaffestunde, Wed.,
March 8, 3-5 p.m.. 3050 Frieze Bldg.
* *xI
Russky Kruzhok, Tea and Russian
conversation, Tues., March 7, 3-5 p.m.,
3050 Frieze Bldg.
Folklore Society, General meeting and
workshop, 2 p.m., Sat., March 11, SAB
(Third Floor Conference Rooms).
Hillel Foundation, Kosher Dining
Club, 1429 Hill; Sabbath meals: Fri-
; Jay at 6 p.m., Saturday at noon. Call
663-4129 today for reservations.
Newman Student Association, Grad-
uate students' mass and supper, Wed..
March 8, 5 p.m., Newman Center, X31
Thompson.

I

. - . .. --. - . -r-. - -

} ive iu Ilher l VerIn, Kaffeest.1 nde, W ed..

Al

pwfm I

DIIAL 5-6290

- W

lit was
going to be
a lovely
funeral.2
P-
Harry'f.
Palmer
just hEped
rit wouldn't
MI CHAEL CAIE IN

HOLDIG FO

rwar m w raw .0"

---..NN~

HOLDING FOR
A THIRD WEEK!
A Carlo Ponti Productio

- DIAL 8-6416
ifl

.
.:. '
::-- it s j .

I

Hecklers Interrupt
Political Discussion

Phone 434-0130
E .an On RPNTR ROAD
NOW SHOWING OPEN 6:30 p.m.
- FREE HEATERS --

.1

"BEST
FILM
OF
19661"
Notionol
Society
of Film Critics *

WALT DISNEY
POME!
e- ta Sw vNud- TECHNICOLOR*
-Also--
Disney Cartoon
-- FRIDAY
"IS PARIS BURNING?"
Lose Something?
Find it with a
Daily Classified

A

Ia

(Continued from Page 1)
ub, declared, "I'm a father of eight
children and I'm used to noisy
dinner-table conversations. But I'll
be damned if I can speak over
this."
Hart then asked Pollock, "How
representative is this of potential
alumni of the University?" Pol-
lock replied, "This is a very, very
small minority of the great stu-
dent body of this campus." The
rest of the audience began to ap-
plaud.
Numerous spectators began to
speak with the Voice members,
interrupting the meeting further.
As shouts of "we want to know
trying to dissuade them from in-
why the United States is killing
thousands of people in Viet Nam"
continued, Pollock said to the au-
dience, "I'm deeply ashamed of
the performance of this small mi-
nority of students who are dis-
rupting the meeting. I apologize
to the audience. I will ask them
once more to preserve order or
leave the room."
Nadel then shouted to Pollock,
"We won't be quiet until you agree
to ask the questions (which we
have submitted.)" Pollock retorted,
"If you'll be quiet maybe we can
get to them."
Friedman, sitting with Rothber-
ger-who himself had been argu-
ing actively with Regent Paul
Goebel (R-Grand Rapids) and
another unidentified member of
the audience-added, "We want to
take part in a discussion."
Pollock replied, "We're not in-
terested in your opinioons. We're
interested in the opinions of these
great public servants up here."
As the uproar continued, Ford,
visibly angry, declared, "From
1931-1935 I was astudent here. It
was a period of very deep contro-
versy. But even though we had
differences of opinon-and they
were strong differences-at least
everyone had enough decency to
respect the rights of other people."
Nadel, who was standing near
the podium, shouted back, "You're
a liar. In those days my father
was getting beaten up for support-
ing the Spanish loyalists.
While the heckling, diminished
somewhat, continued, Pollock be-
gan again to read the written
questions, which ranged from
changes in the social securitiy pro-

gram to the war in Viet Nam.
Speaking of the recent disclos-
ures that the Central Intelligence
Agency had subsidized scores of
organizations, including the Na-
tional Student Association, Ford
said the CIA "is performing its
functions within the guidelines of
policy," adding, "Some of the
things that are happening here
today demonstrate the need for
representation of U.S. students of
a responsible kind at student con-
ferences around the world."
Hart, however, declared, "If
that (CIA subsidies for private or-
ganizations) is the only way we
can get students to conferences,
it's the worst agency to do it."
Adding that "we were all instinc-
tively offended" by the CIA dis-
closures, he said open govern-
ment assistance was preferable to
covert support.

LRit ELHHD IE SULVA
joHnson-s8omER-H08CNA
~ NIGEL
W l GREEN
E AUO w SL :
TECNNICOLORO Shown at 7:05 & 10:30

Fuaneral iloeran
TECHNICOLOR@ PANAVISION
1 :15-3:15-5:15-7:20-9:20
Next r "NIGHT OF THE GENERALS"

TODAY AT
7 & 9 P.M.

Also-
Technicolor.
I ' Shown at
:0, 9 P.M. Only
ROBERT JOCELYN DAN
FULLER'LANE-DURYEA
PLUS-
"TURKEY A GO-GO"
A Turkish Delight in Color
COLOR CARTOON

I

I

Cinema Guild and the Dramatic Arts Center present:
THE FIFTH ANN ARBOR FILM FESTIVAL
Tuesday, March 7 through Sunday, March 12
Screenings at 7 and 9 Tuesday through Saturday
in the Architecture Auditorium.
Each program is different.
Sunday: Award Winners and Highlights. Screenings at 7, 9, and 11.
STILL ONLY 75c Series tickets on sale in the Architecture
and Design Buildings from 4 to 7 on Tuesday, March 7.
--

9

Cinema 11
presents
Tennessee,
Williams'
NIGHT
OF THE
IGUANA
RICHARD BURTON
DEBORAH KERR
AVA GARDNER
Friday and Saturday
Aud. A, Angell Hall
7 and 9.15 P.M.
50c
I.D Required

Join
The Daily
Sports Staff

Michelangelo Antonioni's
first English language film.
storring
Vanessa Redgrave

CT me Mgazine, Newsweek, Saturday
Review, Lile Magazine, E.T.Y., The
New Yorker, Commonweal, The
New Republic, The Village Voice,
The New Leader.
Re am e nle f r mu e a vdie .,

BLOW-UP.
co-starring
David Hemmings
Sarah Miles
COLOR
A Premier Productions Release

I --

LA ST. TIME- ITE!4
PTP TICKET OFFICE, MENDELSSOHN THEATRE
r /1

hw

EXTRA SUN. MAT.!
Good Seats at All Prices.
NTHE TOUCH OF GREATNESS!
N.Y. TIMES'

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__

_. ... _ _.

Phone 434-0190 The Area's Finest
easy to reach-2 m
Washtenaw Rd. or
BOX OFFICE
e cARPENTER ROAD AT 6:30
FIRST RUN STARTS WEDNESDAY F
a JACK H. HARRIS'
BEDTIME
STORY
but
nun ,rr_.

Drive-in is
iles South of
n Carpenter.

i

The University of Michigan
PROFESSIONAL THEATRE PROGRAM
Production of
c5n Ev nin Frost
By DONALD HALL
Directed by MARCELLA CISNEY

OPEN
FREE HEATERS

l -t

I

Starring

WILL GEER

Anne Gee Byrd - Thomas Coley -
Jack Davidson

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- :.. U -. ,,, :.; M R L U . - - I . tl _ IA I -M ion ur JAm c

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