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February 26, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-26

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 26, 1967

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 26, 1967

Collins Introduces New Songs
For Diversified Performance

FILMS

(Continued from Page 1)
ing professionally for four years,
she first performed with piano ac-
companiment last. year at Carne-
gie Hall. The use of piano was
warmly received by the audience
then and so she has continued it.
There is no wonder that shej
uses it because her strong alto
voice, with its unlimited upper
range, sounds like an on-pitch
Barbara Streisand. Due to her
early and extensive training on
piano, she commented during the
performance that she still feels
more at home with the keyboard
than with strings.
Miss Collins' songs are person-
al, and that personality is infused
with wry humor and deep convic-
tions. She altered the traditional
"Silver Dagger Song" until its mes-

sage was humorous rather than
melodramatic. In fact, many of
her songs reflected her ability to
give special emphasis by means of
a dramatic pause or phrase.
Several of her songs containeda
an anti-war message. Along with .
a beautiful rendition of Tom Pax-
ton's "LBJ" song, she added an-
other song that included these
lines :
We are not here to sing
We are here to kill the dove.
Miss Collins, in several of her
songs disparages the 'carefree life
of the folk singer who wants to be
'collected' more than anything"
as well as the lives of those who
would be social recluses. In Coh-
en's "Suzanne," she singst:
And you want to travel with her

And you want to travel blind,
For she's touched your perfect
body
With her mind.
In her hectic schedule of con-
certs and recordings, Miss Collins
professes that her love of music
justifies it all.

'Blow-Up
By RICHARD AYERS
Michelangelo Antonioni sur-
prises the public with each new
film he makes; his mode of ex-
pression changes so radically be-
tween "Eclipse" and "Red Desert,"
and "Red Desert" and "Blow-up"
that one's expectations are never

in an excitingly new way each
time. These concerns are: (1) the
nature of a mechanized society
and the neurotic products of that
society, and (2) an investigation of
"objective reality" and peoples' in-
teraction with that.
In "Blow-up," David Hemmings

I

Attempts To Perceive Objective Reality

realized. But he is, in
sidering his same preo

The Week To Coimie: A

Hatcher Criticizes Daily
For 'Youthful Harshness'

(Continued from Page 1)
the establishment of the Board
by the Regents.
"The question recently raised by
the Board in Control itself and by
the members of the faculty Senate
Advisory Committee on University
Affairs is pertinent, and it is also
of concern to the Regents. That
question is whether the present
structure, responsibility, purposes
and, procedures of the Board in
Control are adequate to the pres-
ent day needs of a University of
35,000 students, 40 per cent of
whom are' already beyond their
undergraduate years. The Univer-

sity Regents have further ques-
tions about the total needs of the
University for internal and ex-
ternal communications.
"As for other questions which
have arisen in the past few days,
I say only this. First, Regents'
conversations with the President
are private matters. I do not dis-
cuss them .Second, The Daily has
had nearly 16 years of non-inter-
ference from mepained as I have
been at times by its youthful
harshness and by the occasional
damage to the University which I
and others have labored quietly
to repair."

SUNDAY, FEB. 26
2:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Extra Series presents
the Minneapolis Symphony Or-
chestra directed by Stanislaw
Skrowaczenski in Hill Aud.
2:30, 7, and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents experimental dance
films in the Architecture Aud.
4:15 p.m.-The School of Music
presents the U-M Stanley Quartet
in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m. - The School of Music
presents Gounod's opera "Faust"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
MONDAY, FEB. 27
4:00 p.m.-Prof. Emeritus Ella
E. McNeil of the School of Public
Health will speak on "Public
Health Nursing in Transition" in
the Public Health Aud.
TUESDAY, FEB. 28
8:30 p.m.-The University Phil-
harmonia, with Josef Blatt and
Theo Alcantara conducting, and
Jeffrey Hollander as pianist, will
perform at Hill Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Andres Segovia, gui-
tarist, will perform in Rackham
Aud.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1
9:00 a..-Registration for the
Sesquicentennial Alumni Celebra-

tion will be held in th
the Union.
8:00 p.m.-John D.
wieler of Stanford Univ
speak on a "Study of Ior
Reactions by Cycvotron
Spectroscopy" in Room
Physics-Astronomy Bldg
8:30 p.m.-Andres Sej
tarist, will perform in
Aud.
THURSDAY, MAR
10:00 a.m.-The first
tennial Alumni Celebra
Session will present "Th
Free Expression" in
Lecture Hall.
2:30 p.m.-The Sesqui
Alumni Celebration w
"The Political Picture
Rackham Lecture Hall.
6:00 p.m. - Sesqui
Alumni Celebration Rec
Banquet, Michigan Ur
room.

fact, con- plays a young photographer on the
ccupations London hip scene, one of the
Campus CalendarI
e lobby of FRIDAY, MARCH 3
10:00 a.m. - Sesquicentennial
Baldesch- Alumni Celebration Topic Session
'ersity will will be "American Enterprise -
n-molecule What Lies Ahead" and "The Law
Resonance and Public Order" in the Rackham
'96 of the Lecture Hall.
govia, gui- 2:30 p.m. -- Sesquicentennial'
Rackham lumni Celebration will present
"Michigan in Orbit" in the Rack-
ham Lecture Hall.
CII 2 6:00 p;m. - Sesquicentennial
Sesquicen- Alumni Celebration Public Recep-
tion Topic tion in the League Ballroom.
ie Right of SATURDAY, MARCH 4
Ra; khanm All day - Sesquicentennial
Alumni Ceaintinn on nim en fnn

demi-gods of popular culture. In The "plot." is concerned with to believe there were sounds of
order to satisfy the huge appetite the accidental discovery of a mur- tennis balls in the last scene.
:f mass-entertainment-consumers. der by Hemmings while he is But for the artist, there is no
society created a sub-culture of taking pictures in the park. This telling which of his perceptions
freaks-not the huge group of is not important in any solving- are made by his own eye and
teenie-boppers, r u n-o f-the-mill the-murder sense, but in its com- which ones correspond to the vis-
hippies, and drug freaks, but the ment on the "artist's vision." ion of the common people. Thus
tiny elite which makes fashion Antonioni has previously con- he stands apart from other people
trends and magazine circulation. cerned himself with the "things, to such an extent that there is no
Antonioni looks with some stuff, reality" of the modern reason to report the murder; he
amusement on this culture of world and how these things inter- has no evidence left which the
"mutants," yet he can't help act with humans: a reality in ac- world will understand. The evi-
having respect for the photo- tion, kinetic relationships. In dencetisrjust there inhi hea
grapher, for this person stands out "Blow-up," he has shifted to con- and there is nothing he can do
as the artist among the sheep, and sidering reality as percieved. This with it.
thus the artist of the modern is not to say that there is an ab- Antonioni's concern with this
world. David Hemmings is not solute dichotomy, but the em- perception, and desire to bring it
one-dimensional like his zombi phasis is certainly different. to the audience, is evident from
friends, he is the creative rather -the fantastic manipulation of
than passive element of popular The photographer is highly color. He doesn't hesitate to paint
tha pasiv elmen ofpoplarskilled in looking, just looking, at' streets, trees, and grass in order
culture.things around him. Visual percep- to fill the screen with the "right"
For him, the herds of fashion jtion is his "trade" and and the look. The Italians seem to be the
models are less than objects. He discoveries he makes are beyond only movie-makers who recognize
has no respect, or even lust, for the scope of the "ordinary" eye. the immeasurable importance of
all his followers. Yet he is trapped But what he perceives is not just color on the screen. Fellini seems
in the same rat race; with all the a sharper version of what every- to use it to alter and fantasize
money and all the "run of the one can see, but what most peo- reality, Antonioni uses it to make
studio" he possesses, he isn't able ple would consider unreal. It was us SEE reality.
to do what he wants: "I'm fed up his sharpened vision which made "Blow-up" is exciting to watch
with those bitches. Wish I had him discover the murder, but the for reasons of both the composi-
tons of money, then I'd be free." "unreal" vision which caused him tion and the action.

A

I

icentennial
ill discuss
e Today,"
icentennial
eption and
nion Ball-

House.
SUNDAY, MARCH 5
9:00 a.m. - Sesquicentennial
A 1 u m n i Celebration Farewell
Breakfast in the Union Ballroom.
2:30 p.m.-Pianist Arthur Rub-
instein will performh in Hill Aud.

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