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February 25, 1967 - Image 8

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

-9

PAGE Imr

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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Several Plots To Kill Kennedy
Indicated by District Attorney

Romania Economy Both
Successful, Backward

I

SATURDAY,FEBRUARY 25,1967
DAILY OFFICIAL B1LLETI
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NEW ORLEANS (A)-Dist. Atty.
-Jim Garrison said yesterday his
investigation of President John
F. Kennedy's assassination in-
dicates "there were several plots"
to kill the president.
He would give no further details
except to say, 4"The names of the
individuals and the groups are
known."
"There were several plots and
a change of direction in them did
occur," the new Orleans district
attorney said. Garrison maintains
Kennedy was killed as a result of
a conspiracy hatched in New Or-
leans.
Private Fund
The disclosures came following
a luncheon at which he received
promise of a private fund that
could amount to $50,000 or more
per month to finance his contro-
versial investigation.
The fund has a base of an es-
timated $5,000 a month pledged at

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the luncheon, to which 50 New Or-
leans bisunessmen had been in-
vited. The meeting was called to
create a formal organization for
receiving dispersing funds.
The organization was given the
name "Truth and Consequences."
After the luncheon, Garrision
was surrounded by newsmen,
checking on a report that he had
just announced the Kennedy as-
assination was solved. Garrison
explained that he merely used a
different word to state what he
had said previously: Arrests will
be made and convictions obtained.
Arrests Not Imminent
"What I've been trying to em-
phasize is that arrests are not im-
minent," he said. "For them to
say arrests will take place any
day is ridiculous. They asked me
if it might be in the next few
day, and I said it might be
months-that it might be 30!
years."

Mao's Cultural Revolution
MaosUMay Become Uncontrollable
By WILLIAM L. RYAN distributed grain and other mate-
Associated Press Special Correspondent rials which had been held in re-
Scraps of hard information serve. It thus could rally low-level
from Red China sugest that Mao support to resist the Red Guard
Tse-tung set in motion something militants.
he is unable to control, and that This tactic brought from Peking
the chairman 'f aces the possibility howls of "economism." That
of a bitter retreat. meant, basically, that the opposi-
Behind what appears already to tion to Mao was trying to bribe
be a sharp setback for Mao is a peasants and workers.
desperate situation in China's ag- The Red Guard storm has oeen
riculture. Mao's "great proletarian going on since August. It inter-
c u 1 t u r a 1 revolution" evidently I rupted education, inteferred with
wrought havoc, rail communications, cut down
In addition, Mao's hordes of factory production. It has put the
young Red Guards and "revolu- food supply in jeopardy.
tionary rebels" have damaged the All this was in the name of
basic structure of the ruling Com- permanent revolution. Mao by-
munist party. This creates bitter passed whole generations in what
enemies for Mao among the bu- appeared to be a desperate at-
reaucrats who have run the coun- tempt to secure his place in the
try for 18 years. pantheon of Communist gods, to
It is still too soon to judge indoctrinate the younger genera-
whether one side or the other in tion in Maoism.
the power struggle has emerged The more realistic, practical and
the victor. But there is a note of mature people of the middle gen-
panic in "urgent appeals" broad- erations may yet prove to havej
cast to a country that is chron- weathered the storm by resistance
ically short of food. to Mao's excesses.
"The season for plowing is im- If they do, Mao will have lost
minent," said one Peking appeal. face. In that case, there is even
"There is no time to lose." a chance that some repairs could'
It demanded immediate mobili- be made to realtions between the
zation of farm forces to make up Soviet and Chinese Communist
for time lost in preparing forparties.
spring sowing, and of "all hands More likely, some sort of com-
in the struggle against drought in promise between the two contepd-
conditions are serious." ing forces in China will permit
Regional radio broadcasts ap- Mao at least to remain as the fig-
peal for all-out farm effort. urehead ruler. In that case, a rap-
Peasants are urged to fight the proachment with Moscow would
farm battle "as if it were a po- be difficult, and the danger of
litical war." continued dissidence in China's
Peking radio voices special con- frontier provinces would remain.
cern about the northern provinces,
where transport and distribution
have been disrupted. Those areas
border the Soviet Union, involv-
ing the possibility of significant
Soviet help to anti-Mao dissidents
which could break the areas away
from China.
The opposition to Mao used
every trick it could command, in-
cluding infiltration and confusion,
so that Red Guards, accustomed
to obeying the commands of wall
posters, attacked even stalwarts
of the Mao camp. The Red
Guards and "revolutionary rebels" The
thus have become a two-edged,
weapon.
The reputed creator of the Red
Guards, Defense Minister Lin Piao,
has not appeared in public for
monthsalthough his name ap-
pears in the Peking press as on
"Chairman Mao's closest comrade-
in-arms." There is a possibility
now that Mao and some of those
supporting him - including Pre-
mier Chou En-lai-have conclud-
ed that Lin no longer can control
the dragon.
The entrenched bureaucracy in
party committees of the provinces
raised wages and public welfare
benefits in farms and factories,

As to the emphasis on his re-
ported statement that the case
was now "solved," he made clear
this represented no revelation.
"I wouldn't have said days ago
that there would be arrests if we
'hadn't had the case solved. I
thought I made that explicit. But
that doesn't mean arrest are im
minent."
Building a Case
He again stressed that arrests
in the case may be months away
and that he "was building a case
that I can take into court." He
expressed confidence that these
would produce convictions.
"We are going to be able to
arrest every human involved who
is still alive."
This apparently referred to the
death of David W. Ferrie, a man
Garrison had labeled as important
to his investigation. Ferrie was
found dead in his apartment Wed-
nesday morning. Garrison again
called it "suicide-without any
question."
But the coroner, Nicholas Chet-
ta, said yesterday chemical tests
produced no evidence of barbitur-
ates, alcohol or other drugs or
chemicals which could have pro-
duced death. The . coroner said
death resulted from natural caus-
es-a massive brain hemorrhage.
Dr. Chetta said there was no evi-
dence whatsoever of violence.
Garrison's investigation won
powerful support in the creation
of the private fund.
Three local businessmen instru-
mental in its organization-Joseph
Rault Jr., Willard Robertson and
a Cecil Shilstone-explained crea-
tion of the fund.
"This was done to express our
confidence in our district attor-
ney and to state we will have full
confidence in his ability, his in-
tegrity, and the integrity of his
office," Rault said.
Rault, Shilstone and Robertson.
who is an auto distributor, will act
as shepherds of the fund, which
will be kept in a bank. They will
' distribute it to Garrison as he
needs it.
, "If he needs money to send an
investigator somewhere, he'll have
no trouble doing it," Robertson
said.
, By having such a private fund
at his call, Garrison will be able
to dispatch investigators in any
direction he wishes, or to any
place he desires without resorting
to public funds. This would pre-
vent anyone from getting clues to
his investigative activities through
examination of vouchers.
"It is the public responsibility of
-any public official to send to the
attorney general any information
he has gathered in this matter,"
f said Ford, who was a member of
the Warren Commission that in-
vestigated Kennedy's death.

BUCCHAREST, Romania (P) -
Romania's economy, aiming at
more ambitious growth targets
than any of the country's Com-
munist allies, presents a picture
both of success and shortcomings
The success story has often been
told by Romanian leaders and has
fascinated even some Western ex-
perts. The shortcomings are now
under study after being laid here

bare by the hard-driving party
chief, Nicolae Ceassescu.
Statistically there seems to be
little cause for concern by the
party. According to figures, just
published, industrial production
was up 11.7 per cent, national in-
come 7.9, farm ut7purt11.2 and,
labor productivity 7.9 per cent dur-
ing 1966.
The figures are generally re-1
garded by Western diplomats asI
reliable. They show targets exceed-
ed in most branches of the econo-
my. Industrial investments, about

munist planning has it that such (Continued from Page 2) City of Toledo, Ohio-Personnel Tech-1
losses are even provided for under nician I. Resident of Toledo in future.
the plan. For 1967, the envisaged hMartha Cgok Blg.s Wilteopnor grad in personnel or public admin.. 1
the lan Fo 197, te evisgedthe first eight weeks of the Spring- yr. exper. in public or industrial per-{
total is $189 million. Summer session. University women may sonnel. Adv, to two other levels.
"The time has come to do away apply. Call NO 2-3225. Leonard Refineries, Inc., Alama, Mich.
-Internal Auditor for immed. opening,
with this grave manifestation of Recreational Swimming at Margaret :oncerned with mgmt. practices of Co.
economic backwardness," Ceau- Hell Pool: Additional hours for women jobbers and distributors. Openings for
sescuobserved."Noec ycan students, starting Mon., Feb. 27: Mon- acctg. majors and bus. ad. degrees with
economy days, 11 a.m. to 12 noon and 5 p.m. to acctk. bkgd. or exper. Varied jobs with
afford to finance a number of en- 7 p.m. Tuesdays 12 noon to 1 p.m. much adv. potential.
terprises at the expense of others." Wednesdays 11 a.m. to 12 noon. After Wm. F. Lehmann, Inc., Ct. Paul, Minn.
the spring recess, 12 noon to 1 p.m. and -Male grad, married pref.. degree or
The technology lag is apparent 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. will be added on more in Biol., Botany, Basteriol., some'
from the fact that Romanian tool Thursdays. chem. and phys. Working supervisor of
experts achieved an average price mushroom house, all phases of grow-1
exet Doctoral Examination for Donald Hor- ing, fertilizing and checks on temp.
of $1,176 per ton in 1964 while ace Gobold, Education; thesis: "A Com- and manure for meeting crop produc-
French sales in this branch av- parison of Attitudes Toward School, tion standards.
eraged $2,710 and Switzerland's Self-Perception, and Achievement of Institute for Educational Research,1
$4,827 Eighth Grade Pupils Attending Junior Downers Grove, Ill.-Research Associ-
High Schools in Communities of Dif- ate, projects for coming year-Consult.
Labor productivity is officially ferent Levels of Economic Affluence," :>n Res. & Innovation, Teacher made
said to be between two and three Sat., Feb. 25, Room 4002, University resting and Sex Education. PhD in
times lower than in Italy and High School, 9 a.m. Chairman, Huls-, Ed. Res. pref. Pref. exper. teaching or
lander. research, programming, or processing
France. Industrial production is equipment.
planned to grow by a dramatic 73 Doctoral Examination for Alexander * *
placent between 1966 and 1970 Armand Lesueur, Music Performance For further information please call
per (Flutist); recitals in lieu of thesis: 764-7460, General Division, Bureau of
while the labor force will increase Sat., Feb. 25, Room 3023 School of Mu- Appointments, 3200 SAB.
only 20 per cent. sic, at 11 a.m. Chairman, N. M. Hauen-
stein SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:

5, per cent short 01fbthe goat weresuperiority of socialism over cap-
among the few exceptions. italism," Ceausescu declared. "Yet
Waste of material, technological as long as some advanced capital- AN
lags and general deficiencies in ist countries produce at lower costs I
planning and economic manage- and at higher technological stand- Cen
ment were exposed by Ceausescu ards we will be unable to prove this Sch
in an unprecedented criticism superiorioy." cre
voiced during a party plenum last Party officials and Cabinet U
December. . ministers have come under fire forfD
The big proportion of rejects in not trying hard enough to check istr
a number of products was men- the deficiencies. Orders have gone A
tioned by him as one of the points eout to economic researchers to No
reflecting a "gravely negative conduct thorough studies. ogr
state of affairs." Ih
sinpointedfars.evenThe controlled press has also Jan
Pinpointed as even more worni- pndiscomst apa ndpro
some was the fact that losses dur- opened its columns to appeals and era
ing 1966 totaled $222 million n suggestions for increasing quality
industry.A phenomenon of Coin- and lowering production costs. Pas

Placement

NOUNCEMENTS:
Tebster 'Montassori Society -- Trng.
nters throughout U.S. & Europe.
olarships available to become ac-
dited Montessori teacher, any BA.
f. ed. or psych.
Univ. of North Dakota, Grand Forks,
D.-Graduate Assistantahips in Dept.
Ed, Internships in teaching, admin-
ation and research.
ipine Geophysical Associates, Inc.,
rwood, N.J.-Staff positions in Ocean-
aphy, Acout., Geophys., Ocean., Me-
anical, elect. and electron engrg. for
a or spring grads. Summer trng.
gram for students in oceanog. Coop-
tive stud. asst. programs also.
SITION OPENINGS:
I

I'TErVlZIEwNS:
FEB. 27-
Camp Mapiehurst, Mlich.-Coed. Will
intervie here 1 seb. 27 from 10 a.m.
to 5 pm. Coun elors covfering all fields,
cooks and dishwashers,
FEB. 28-
National Music Camp, laterloclen,
Michl.- 9-5, Counselors., hotel desk clerk
and typist.
U.S. Atomic Energy Commission, Sche-
nectady, N.Y.-Summer positions for Tr.
Sr. & Grads in Bus. Ad., Public Ad.,
Econ., Hist., Poli, Sci., Acctg., Law,
Chem., Engrg-CE ChE IEDME Metall. &
Nuclear Engig., Physics and Math. Ap-
'plications due Feb. 28.
Flint Golf Club, Flint, Iich.-Male &
remale over 21, director, asst, director
and 2 other openings.
Sealtest Foods, Detroit, Mich.-Male
& female. Varied jobs, good pay.
Parker Pen Co., Janesville, Wis.-
Metal. Chem./Phys. for summer.
Jack Roberts Pool Service, Farmin,--
ton, Mich-Outdoor work as mainten-
ance man on pools, must have car.
Glacier National Park. Montana -
Applications now in stock, apply early.
Foreign Students-Work for Yosemit
National Park, see the U.S., applications
at Summer Placement Service.
Details and applications at 212 SAB,
lower level.

Across
Camputs
SATURDAY, FEB. 25
7 and 9 p.m. - Cinema Guild
presents experimental dance films'
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m. - The School of Music
presents Gounod's opera "Faust"
in. Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
SUNDAY, FEB. 26
2:30 p.m.-The University Mus-
ical Society Extra Series presents!
the Minneapolis Symphony Or-
chestra directed by Stanislaw
Skrowaczenski in Hill Aud.
2:30, 7, and 9 p.m. - Cinema
Guild presents experimental dance
films in the Architecture Aud
4:15 p.m.-The School of Music
I presents the U-M Stanley Quartet
in Rackham Aud.
8 p.m. - The School of Music
presents Gounod's opera "Faust"
in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre.
Read and Use
, Daily Classifieds

"Now on the Newstands"
SWINGER'S GUIDE
A complete illustrated guide
To all the
" ACTIVITIES
" ORGANIZATIONS
" CLUBS
* GROUPS
" And OTHER PLACES For
DINING, DRINKING, AND DANCING
IN WASHTENAW COUNTY
for single adults and
those who like to swing

Who's the Man Behind
the4c Canadian Nickel?
Announces a Real Live
CONTEST
For the best cartoon of Ann Arbor's
Grafter Supreme
FIELDING F. RAALF
Just look at these neat prizes
YOU can win:
1st PRIZE: $20 worth of groceries
2nd PRIZE: $10worth of groceries
3rd PRIZE: $5 worth of groceries
BOOBY PRIZE: One free popsicle each
day of the semester
All entries must be submitted to the Garg office on
or before Feb. 28th.
Winners will be announced by carrier pigeon.

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WORSHIP

qan Daily is
y for those. of rare insight,

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room1011SAB.
* * *
Newman Student Association, Art
'ilm. Ingmar Bergman's "Virgin Spring.
Feb. 25, 7 and 9 p.m., Newman Center,
331 Thompson. Minimal admission
charge.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk dance,
Mon., Feb. 27, 8:30-10:30 p.m., Women's
Athletic Bldg.
Young Friends, Happening, Sun., Feb.
26, 5:30 p.m., Friends Center, 1416 Hill.
* * *
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
'Washtenaw, Sun., Feb. 26, 9:45 and
11:15 a.m. services will be conducted
by the Rev. Kapfer. Sermon: "A Hope-
[nspiring Apostle." Holy communion will
be offered in both services. Bible class
at 11:15 a.m.
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., worship services at 9:30 and

However,

cal perspective,
and keen business sense.
well also accept you.

PACKARD ROAD BAPTIST CHURCH
Southern Baptist Convention
1 131 Church St.
761-0441
Rev. Tom Bloxam
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
1 1 :00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:30 p.m.-Training Union.
7:30 p.m.-Evening Worship.
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1 432 Washtenow Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30 a.m. and 12:00 noon.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
CANTERBURY HOUSE
330 Maynard
11:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
During Lent there will be a service of Holy
Communion at 7 a.m. each week day.
ST. ANDREW'S EPISCOPAL CHURCH
306 N. Division
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.
S11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer-Special music.
NORTH SIDE EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
(North Campus)
1679 Broadway
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Holy Com-
munion.
ST. CLARE'S EPISCOPAL CHAPEL
2309 Packard
8:00 a.m.-Holy Comunion.
9:15 a.m.-Morning Prayer and Sermon.
1 1 :00 a.m.-Holy Communion and Sermon.

WESLEY FOUNDATION AND
FIRST METHODIST CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
Phone 662-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
Bartlett Beavin, Associate Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 1 1:15 a.m.-Worship Services. Dr.
Rupert: "Encounter With Success."
6:00 p.m.-Intercessory Prayers, Chapel.
6:15 p.m.-Fellowship Supper, Pine Room.
Cost 35c. All welcome.
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge. Movie
"The Church at the Campus." Discussion
of Wesley Foundation following.
TUESDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "The New Morality." Lunch 25c.
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. "Mission Program of the
Church." Dinner follows in Pine Room.
'WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m. - Holy Communion, Pine'Room,
followed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
FRIDAY
6:00 p.m.-Young Marrieds, Pine Room. Din-
ner and CBS radio drama "Burlap Bags,"
discussion following.
LUTHERAN STUDANT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Dr. H. O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 1 1 :00 a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 p.m.-Film-"Time for Burning."
WEDNESDAY, 7:15 p.m.-Lenten Service.
BETHLEHEM UNITED
CHURCH OF CHRIST
423 So. Fourth Ave.
Telephone 665-6159
Pastors: E. R. Klaudt, Armin C. Bizer,
W. C. Wright
9:30 and 10:45 a m.-Worship Services.
9:30 and 10:45 a.m.-Church School.
ALDERSGATE STUDENT
FELLOWSHIP and THE ANN ARBOR

SUNDAY
10:00 a m.-Bible School.
1 1 -00 a m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m -Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
'Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General Conf.
Rev Charles Johnson
761-6749
9:30 a.m.-U. Fellowship Coffee Presession.'
9:45 a.m.-U. Fellowship Bible Study.
1 1:00 a.m.-"Work Out Our Own Salvation?!"
7:00 p.m.-"Lost in the Crowd"-speciol
film on surf, sex and salvation among stu-
dents on the beaches.
8:30 p.m.-Fellowship and refreshments in
an announcel home.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services, with Holy
Communion. Sermon on "A Hope-Inspir-
ing Apostle," Contemporary Musical Setting
for Communion Liturgy in 9:45 service.
1':15 a.m.-Bible Study.
WEDNESDAY
10:00 p.m.-Midweek Lenten Service.

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THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann-Arbor High
Roy V. Palmer, Minister

services-Call

I

I1pl1o osto nete

or Bupositon on eiter
the Business or Editorial Staff.

FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
512 E. Huron
James H. Middleton, Minister
Cleo Boyd, Associate Minister
Ronald Tipton, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:45 a.m.-Church School Hour.
1 1 :00 a.m.-Church Worship.

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Streets
663-0589
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor
Morning Services-8:30 and l 1:00 a.m.
9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour-Classes for all
ages.
7:00 p.m.-Gospel Services.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 pm.
If it's- Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Cundamentol, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.

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I CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH

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