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February 22, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-22

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

(, FEBRUARY 22, '1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAV.P QVVVV

~, FEBRUARY 22, 1967 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

D A fyE' at'V'%1

v

AAU

Reinstates

All

Foreign

Cindermen

Kheel Denies Hearing Request

N U Eyes Dye as Athletic Director

NEW YORK (M)-The Amateur
Athletic Union, in a swift turn-
about, lifted the suspension of 11
foreign collegiate athletes yester-
day and announced that steps
were being taken to make all for-
eign students eligible for author-
ized track and field competition
in the United States.
This would include both AAU-
sanctioned meets and closed
events sponsored by the rival U.S.
Track and Field Federation, Col.
Don Hull, executive director of
the AAU, said.
The action was taken before at-
torney Theodore Kneel, chairman
of the four-man Sports Arbitra-
tion Panel set up by a Senate re-
solution to arbitrate the AAU-
USTFF dispute, turned down a,
request by the USTFF for a hear-
ing on the latest controversy.

The newest furor developed
when the AAU suspended the 11
foreign athletes for competing in
a USTFF meet here Feb. 10 which
lacked AAU sanction.
The AAU insisted that no for-
eign athlete can ,compete in a
meet-whether he is a collegian
or not-without the consent of the
ruling athletic body in that coun-
try. This, the AAU said, is the
rule of the International Track
and Field Federation.
The USTFF, an organization
made up largely of colleges and
high schools, argued that no sanc-
tion was needed for a purely
school-or closed--meet.
On Feb. 17, the arbitration
panel, seeking a temporary settle-
ment, ordered the USTFF to seek
sanction for the meet retroactively
and the AAU to grant that sanc-

tion while lifting the suspension
of the affected athletes.
Nothing was done.
Kheel called a press conference
Tuesday at his mid-town office
to announce that he felt the Feb.
17 order had been misunderstood
by Father Wilfred Crowley, presi-
dent and one of the organizers
of the USTFF.
Feeling the order was prejudi-
cial to the over-all case being
studied by the panel, Father Crow-
ley, a priest in Los Altos, Calif.,
asked for a hearing.
Kheel rejected the request and
repeated his order that the USTPF
apply by telegram immediately for
saction of its Feb. 10 meet. At
the same time, he asked the AAU
to grant the sanction and lift the
suspensions.
The war between the AAU and
the National Collegiate Athletic
Association, which spawned the
USTFF, has been going for six
years. There have been periods
of dictated peace-such as that
priror to th 1964 Olympics in To-
kyo.
Scores
NBA
Boston 143, New York 114
Detroit 112, St. Louis 109
Los Angeles at San Francisco (inc)
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Indiana State 88, Butler 85
SMU 69, Arkansas 66
Villanova 55, Providence 52
Chicago Loyola 73, Ohio U. 70
Davidson 7, VMI 69 s
8t. John's 71, Syracuse 64

I
t
3

EVANSTON ()-Tippy Dye, a looks as if the matter is all smallest and only private school
man who has always been on the sealed." in the Big Ten.
go, is expected to make his final However, another university "You'll find I haven't stayed any
move if and when he accepts thesm place too long . .. and that teams
athletic directorship at North- source said no announcement is have won where I've been."
western University. anticipated at this time. The former three-sport star at
Dye arrived Monday for a sec- The 51-year-oldhDye, however, Ohio State said he is fully familiar
ond interview with Dr. Roscoe left little doubt that he is ready with the problems of running
Miller, University president. He is to fill the vacancy left when Stu Northwestern's athletic depart-
expected to announce his accept- Holcomb resigned last December ment. These problems include high
ance of the job and his resigna- to become general manager of the tuition, high entrance require-
tion as Nebraska athletic director Chicago Mustangs in the North ments and 30 years without a foot-
in Lincoln today. American Soccer League. ball or basketball championship.
One university source said the "This is something I've always Dye said the job offered a
fact that Dye is making a second done," said Dye when asked why "challenge" and that at his age
appearance for an interview "is he would leave a school-which it would probably be his last move.
tantamount to acceptance and it has been a winner to come to the If Dver'nots the Northwestern

job, Nebraska head football coach
Bob Devaney is expected to also
assume the duties of athletic direc-
tor at Nebraska.
Dye was a freshman at Ohio
State when Holcomb was a senior.
They became close friends and it
was believed that when Holcomb
resigned his first choice for a suc-
cessor was Dye.
However, when a faculty ath-
'letic committee turned in three
names to Dr. Miller, head football
Coach Pete Elliott of Illinois was
hie-h on thelist.

COL. DON HULL

BIG TEN CONSIDERS :
Judgment Due on Mini
CHICAGO (P) - The Big Ten quiring the dismissal of football
will consider taking action today coach Pete Elliott and Harry
against Illinois for recruiting ir- Combes.
regularities, Commissioner Bill Action by the NCAA also must
Reed said yesterday. come after the Big Ten's disposi-
Reed will present a report to tion of the case.
Big Ten athletic directors on the Illinois' own probe showed that
conference's investigation, which the funds were created With the
opened Dec. 16 after the univer- knowledge of the athletic director
sity itself took action.. and his assistant and disbursed at
1Th ha b i the direction of Elliott and

Kheel announced Tuesday that
his panel would meet with the two
warring parties a final time in
New York April 6-7 to review the
case.
J'Aeeuse!'
NEW YORK (I)-The U.S. Track
and Field Federation accused the
Amateur Athletic Union of violat-
ing anti-trust lawsand threatened
an indemnity suit of at, least
$100,000 last night in the latest
development in the nation's track
and field war.
The Rev. Wilfred H. Crowley
said the USTFF represented 90
per cent of the track and field in-
terests in this country and the or-
ganization saw no need to request
sanction for its competitions.

-- ,V an,,vuo 11G1Y~ ulwvtull igh nr, f-411G lan.

I~

. _

I

I FCannounces
COMMITTEE OPENINGS
MASS TRYOUT MEETING

i

a ere a4s een consdaerawle
speculation about what action the
BigTen may take. It ranges from
nothing more severe than what
the university already has done
to "throwing the book at them."
"There may be no alternative
than taking the latter. The Big
Ten code is emphatic that if re-
cruiting violations occurred cause
must be shown why conference
membership should not be termi-
nated or suspended."
Also looming may be action re-

Combes.
Amounts of payments for vary-
ing periods of time were for $15
a month or $35 a month, and in
one case $50 a month. Expendi-
tures were for assistance in trans-
porting prospective athletes for
campus visits, for miscellaneous
entertainment in connection with
recruiting, for emergency finan-
cial assistance, and, in certain
cases, for regular payments to
athletes above the legal grants in
aid.

r

= i

FRATERNITIES AT MICHIGAN

"T h er'e's going

to be a what?"

TONIGHT at 8:00

Coming! Sunday, March 5
THE BAND CONTEST THAT
WILL MAKE U of M HISTORY

A FACULTY
DANCE
CONTEST
Sat., Feb. 25 ... 3:30
in the Main Lounge of the Union
Watch your favorite professor
demonstrate his prowess in the
dances of yesteryear: complete
with the Charleston and Blackbottom
Students will be judging-
SO DON'T MISS IT
UN ION-LEAGUE

!f

I
C@ -

Room 3 Rand S
MICHIGAN UNION

_. ____ _ _m.. _

mi

i1

I

UNION-LEAGUE
presents

THE
BATTLE,
of the
BANDS

See the Daily for further Information

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