100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

February 18, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-18

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1967

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 18, 1967

Cagers

Seek

To,

Close

Ohio

State

'Road

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

*

Backstroker Kingery Rules Tank

*
Territory

Show'
Must Find
Anti-Sepic'
Formula

By GRETCHEN TWIETMEYER
He's been a finalist in the NCAA
200-yard backstroke for two years.
And this year only an - Olympic
silver medalist has beaten him.
Impressive.
But for Russ Kingery's pinmate,
Judy Goodlad, a former back-

stroker herself, his real attraction
is his ears. "He can wiggle them,"
she giggles proudly.
Demonstrating this ability he
laments, "My ears have been this
size since I was five. Kids used
to call me everything-Dumbo
Ears, Elephant, Francis the Talk-

ing Mule (my middle name's Fran- "I'd love to take a year off and
cis)." li TestsBucks, G ophfers just to read and write. Sometimes I By JOEL BLOCK
On top of that, Kingery is what I have a compulsive urge to put " Like kissing your sister," is
Judy calls "a real ear:" "Lots of With two non-spectacular swimming teams slated against the things down on paper, like before what Ohio State basketball coach
sophomores go to him with prob- tankes this weekend, and these the last dual meets before the Big the nationals last year I stayedFred Taylor says abot his team's
lems and he talks to them and'm up late that night writing and 2-2 Big Ten away record.
fires them up. He's sensitive and nhthe next day I swam my best But the Buckeyes' 1-3 showing
very thoughtful." Not for Russ Kingery, who still remembers how close Ohio times." at homeus more like kissing your
Born At An Early Age State came to beating Michigan at the end of last season. In The other thing the backstroker dog.
But Kingery feels it took him his opinion, at least, the meet scheduled for 3:30 today will be decided to do was pay more at- When the Michigan cagers step
a long time to get that way. "I partly a grudge meet. tention to the other guy. Kingery on the court of Yost Field House
learned to swim at a very early Michigan swimming coach Gus Stager does not demean the smiles, "My first three years at at , 1:30 this afternoon, they will
age," he reminisces, "because we Buckeyes, observing, "Their coach, Bob Bartels, tries to pace his team Michigan, I used to argue with ';be facing the only squad in the
lie era lake and I'd always BgTnwihhsfrdbte
liverunniginto twhenI'dar- so that they really put out late in the season. That's what they did Gus (Stager, Wolverine swim- Big Ten which has fared better
e last year and that's what they seem to be doing now." ming coach) whenever I didn't RON SEPIC BILL HOSKETe rad than at home.
n't put my face in the watei'sd Stager designated the sprints as OSU's strongest area, where like what he made me do. Natural-- Losing three out of four games
they taught me the backstroke" two juniors, Tom Laken and Tom Call, are possible threats in the tly.he pegged me as a guy who been putting out only enough to at St. Johns Arena is incongruous
At about 3, Kingey decidedSig Ten.As detriedg toagive ohimhaNAroughemtime.awinladualremeetsgbecause, rughenoughenoOgh has h an all-timem
At about 13, Kingery decided Big Ten. As defending champion of the NAAU one meter and plat- But I've concentrated more ing the best time of the season home winning percente of .818),
he was serious about swimming. form events, he pointed to Chuck Knorr to give Michigan divers a working this year and I think his (as he did earlier) puts the bur- but dropping two games by a sin-
For two years, he was a high point battle. opinion has changed." den of maintaining the position gle point each is a catastrophe for
school All-American. Then he The Buckeyes will attempt to provide Kingery's nemesis with on the holder." Ohio State basketball.
transferred to Lawrenceville Pi'ep H asobeieeeh hsMwuaudinYorey
Tom Hopper, who swims both the backstroke and the individual "I try to helpe rs swimmersum
School in New Yersey, where he Ityt epohrsimr u nYu y
broke the school medley. Stager has juggled the events to make the playoff e en out because I know how tough it times in practices that can beat On Jan. 14, the Buckeyes were
rerd nh yd b stre more interesting: "Much to Kingery's distaste, we're putting him is to Gary Diley, whom he feels is the coasting along with a good sized
record in the 100-yard backstroke. st be in their position. It's hard'bgcnedrfrteBgTnledoe nin ntescn
Coming to Michigan he observed in that medley too, to give him practice for the nationals." when you're trying to prove your- big contender for the Big Ten. lead over Indiana in the second
a major change in the atmosphere. Michigan's last dual meet at 7:30 Monday night with Minnesota self in swimming, go to school, and
"In high school I did as much will be the final chance to experiment. The only person Stager fears maintain stable emotions." Always Behind utes and 37 seconds, Ohio State
work but it was a low-keyed type [ere is Marty Knight, a sophomore with impressive times who cild The new sense of direction front He gins likes to ice eut in suffered a steere case of paralysis
of competition. Also, at Michigan go either backstroke or freestyle. which both Kingery and Judy feel swim with the distance freestylers, ly zero points as Indiana sneaked
I got more individual attention. has made him "more mature" haswnyzI
Unilhs eio ya,:oevr .::::::::::::::::::::::::::.:::::::::.:.::::.".::::..:::":::.:::....................... .. .....h sm d i m r aue a who are always ahead of me. It by 8 1-80
Unttl hisssns or yerye ho, evew...r, .............................:........ ............:..........................................::::..::.:.,::::::.:..::::.:::::.,:.:,.,:.:: canged his swim m ing, too. He whsrul a s a ea f m .I - 0
.ingeryju..didncageaiesimigtokoHesure feels good in meets to have Taylor's cryptic comment for the
Kigery just didn't have the s year I stayed awake worrying until swimming in general. "When I now puts the emphasis on strat- everyone behind me." Indina debacle was "It was a
of a ctampion. He reca three 'or four in the morning the started out, the sport was every- ey.IThough most people would think little hairy failing to score in those

I

t
y

A4

Russ Kin gery
CHALLENGE
"Cypernetic Challenge in the University"
"STUDENTS SEE that in spite of all the
pseudo-democratic rhetoric indulged in by the
deans of students, no shreds of power will
come to them."--Weiss
DR. JOHN WEISS
Asst. Prof. of European History
of Wayne State University

Ivy-League
Nears Peaee
With NCAA
NEW YORK (AP)-Agreement is
imminent in the academic dispute
between the Ivy League and the
National Collegiate Athletic As-
sociation that will allow Ivy teams
to compete in postseason cham-
pionships next -month, the Asso-
ciated Press learned last night.
A formal announcement is ex-
pected within the next few days.
"Agreement is very, very close,"
a spokesman for the NCAA told
the AP.
Teams that probably would ben-
efit immediately from a settlement
i ncl1u de Princeton's basketball
team, third - ranked nationally;
Yale in swimming, Cornell in
hockey and Columbia in fencing.
Ivy League teams did not par-
ticipate in NCAA championships
last year when the league refused
to go along with a resolution
adopted at the NCAA's 1966 con-
vention that athletic eligibility
must be limited to students with
a 1.6-or roughly a C-minus-
scholastic average.

night before a meet. I swam
every race at least a hundred
times in my mind, and the actual
event, it was anticlimactic. I was
exhausted before the gun even
sounded."
Useful Lethargy
The turning point in his life
was last summer, when a variety
of things changed his outlook and,
consequently, his swimming. King-
ery spent a leisurely couple
months as a lifeguard, swimming
only when he felt like it. And
thinking.
The first big thing Kingery did
was reduce by 35 to-40 pounds. "It
was the first thing I've ever want-
ed to do that I've actually done. I
felt so good afterwards that every-
thing else has been easy."
The Hulk. a moniker that stuck
even after his mass diminished,
also changed his views about

thing; I wanted all the fame that
went with it. But I realized it
should be put into perspective, and
now I swim for self-satisfaction."
The Book, Too
Other things suddenly became
important, like what would hap-
pen after he graduated. He de-
cided to apply to Michigan law
school, and later go into public
relations. All of which necessitated
a higher gradepoint.
Accordingly, Kingery compiled a
three-point last semester, which
"was rough work because I'm tired
after practice and there's always
the temptation to turn on the
TV.
"It's easy to rationalize cutting
classes, too."
An English major, he laments
the fact that he only has time to
read books for his courses, adding,

"Strategy can make a race and
you aren't really good until you
can use it," he explains. "For ex-
ample, Carl Robie had been win-
ning the 1000-yard freestyle all
year but last week he decided to
set a record in the event. He also
broke the 500 freestyle,' but that
wasn't planned."
Wiley Strategy
Kingery also described some of
his own wiles with Charlie Hick-
cox, Indiana's sophomore back-
stroking prodigy. "At the Minne-
sota relays, I was in better condi-
tion and beat him easily. Knowing
that he's fast, I tried to upset
him at Indiana by getting out in
front where he couldn't see me. It
worked. Last weekend I just kept
a slight lead on him from the
start."
Most of the season, Kingery has

backstroking is just a weird-look-
ing way of relaxing, there is a
moment of shock when watching
Kingery and Dilley in action. Dil-
ley bounces.
This, Kingery explains, is be-
cause, some backstrokers think
they get more power by raising
themselves out of the water. It
wouldn't work for me."
About his skill, Kingery also
notes that backstrokers are "built
funny," that swimming doesn't
built up biceeps and deltoids, it
builds up side muscles.
Though life seems practically
ideal for the senior swimmer,
there are hints that he has not
totally lapsed into a world of
plenty.
"Before meets, he still bites his
fingernails down to pulps," com-
ments Judy.
C'1 11 7

last few minutes."
Their home game with Iowa was
hairer still. The Buckeyes com-
pletely dominated the first half,
1. .. ... ;C:} ; . '4YM # M ti'" ' t 4

G
G
C
F
F
G
G
C
F
F

The Lineups
MICHIGAN
Bankey (6'1"1)
Pitts (6'3")
Dill (6'10")
Stewart (6'6")
McClellan (6'4")
OHIO STATE
Rowley (6'1")
Swain (6'4")
Hoskett (6'7")
Sepic (6'4")
Miller (6'4").

32
24
4
40
42
20
42
25
22
41

I.

r~i UC1U

carrying a comfortable 10-point
lead into the locker room at inter-
mission.
But in the second frame their
margin sifted away like sand and
the Hawkeyes came within a point
with 2:39 left. Iowa coach Ralph
Miller pulled an unusual strategy
from his playbook as Iowa froze
the ball for the next two minutes

"WANTED A society for the prevention
cruelty to undergraduates."

of

Gymnasts Recover trom IVMJ setback;
Championship Picture Remains Unclear

I'

"THE SOCIAL ROLE of the American college
helps to explain the brutal fact that ultimate
authority is vested in men who are quite
ignorant of education."-Weiss
SUNDAY, FEB. 19, AUD. A,
:30 P.M.
Co-sponsored by Honors Steering Committee
and the American Culture Student Association

CO-OP
OPEN HOUSE
Sun. Pickerill
Feb. 19 Co-op
2:30- 923 S.
3:30 Forest

By JON SISKIN
One loss doesn't make, a season.
Maybe history can repeat itself.
Sure, Michigan's gymnastics
team lost a heartbreaker to Mi-
chigan State in a tension-cram-
med dual meet Wednesday, and it
will take a little while to forget
what might have been had a few
breaks been reversed.
But last year the identical thing
happened, and the Wolverines re-
grouped to come up with a specta-
cular showing in the league meet
to win their sixth straight Big Ten
crown.
Reflecting on the MSU encoun-

ter, coach Newt Lokcn had a few
wistful post-mortems. I just can't
say how proud I am of the way
the boys performed. After Michi-
gan State jumped off to their
early lead, we could have easily
folded up. It's tough to pick up as
many points as we lost in the first
three events, but the tramp and
high bar teams came through to
wipe out the deficit and give us
the lead.'
A Miss Is As Good As .. .
The Spartans fought back to
win the parallel bars and the
rings to squeak by with a 190.8-
190.425 triumph. "It was just one
of those things," 4oken philoso-
phized. "We lost a full point in
vaulting because of a foul. This is
comparable to a broad jumper
missing entirely on his final at-
tempt.
"We also missed a routine on
the rings, and weren't as sharp
on a couple of others. You can't
put the blame on one individual,
though, because in a meet with as
much pressure as this one the un-
expected is liable to occur.
"A boy may hit his routine per-
fectly in practice, but the nerv-

NEWT LOKEN

I El_ __

ousness and jitters brought about
by the meet situation can cause
slight flaws which lower his score."
- With the loss to MSU, Michi-
gan's Big Ten mark stands at 2-1,
with wins over Indiana and Illi-
nois. MSU has a 5-1 record, with
its only loss meted out by Illinois
last weekend 189-185.
Iowa is the sole remaining un-
defeated squad with an unblem-
ished 4-0 slate, while Illinois is
3-2 with losses to Iowa and the
Wolverines.

Loken claimed before the start
of the campaign that this year's
race would be extremely closely-
contested, with Michigan, Michi-
gan State, Iowa and Illinois all
having a shot at the title. Up to
this point, the forecast has proved
true. ,
Although the Hawkeyes are un-
beaten, they must still face both
the Spartans and the Wolverines.
State travels to Iowa City this
weekend, and Loken predicts that
if they perform as they did
against us, they should come
through with a victory."
Everything, of course, will de-
pend on 'how well the Wolverines
fare in the conference meet sche-
duled for March 2, 3 and 4 in Iowa
City. If they can repeat their per-
formance of last year, the league
trophy will be in Michigan's pos-
session for the seventh consecutive
year.
The Wolverines are expected to
have no trouble in winning today's
meet at Minneapolis. Minnesota
has an inexperienced squad with
only six lettermen returning, and
presently is winless in the Big Ten.
Dick Hinrichs on the parallel
bars and Bob Hoerchel on the side
horse have been impressive along
with senior captain Dave Naftalin.
Long Drought
Wisconsin, the other participant
in today's meet, has not won a
league championship since 1923.
The Badgers have found the going'
rough again this year, managing
only one conference triumph thus
far.
Loken realizes that next week
his squad faces a supreme test
against Iowa, and it is essential
for Michigan to out-perform the.
Hawkeyes.
"I know the morale is as high
as it has always been; the loss to
Michigan State will make the boys
work even harder from here on
out." The Wolverines have done
it before, and there's no telling it
won't be done again.

and 38 seconds.
Charity Pass
Then Hawkeye forward Gerry
Jones took a deflected pass and
attempted a shot from under the
board. -OSU center Bill Hosket
fouled Jones who calmly flipped
in the ensuing free throws to beat
State 73-72.
The Buckeyes will not prove
easy prey for the home-loving
Wolverines. Junior center Hosket
and senior forward Ron Sepic
(who both played different posi-
tions last year) are the two ma-
por infectors of the OSU plague.
Wolverine center Craig Dill wall
have three inches over the 6'7"
Hosket but he'll have all the com-
petition he could want in the
Buckeyes' leading shooter, scorer,
and rebounder of last year. Hosket
was a cornerman for OSU last year
and averaged 20 points and 11 re-
bounds a game.
As a sophomore forward two
years ago, Sepic lead the team in
rebounds and was second leading
scorer. Coach Taylor switched Nim
to guard last year and he slipped
to third in OSU scoring. Back at
his old corner position this year,
Sepic hasn't found his old shoot-
ing eye yet but his importance has
been on the defensive side.

I

- I

FORESTER'S CLUB ANNUAL
Paul &uiqarn /.?il
LUMBERJACK'S FORMAL
(Blue Jeans & Plaid Shirt)
* Square Dancing with Dean Parker
8-10
" Entertainment 10-11
Forester's Club Jug Band
Skit
Sawing Contest
i The Malemute Saloon
" Round Dancing 11-1 with,
the "Four Gone Conclusions"

k
I

Big Ten Standings

I

Northwestern
Indiana
Iowa
Michigan State
Purdue
Illinois
Wisconsin
Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Minnesota

W
5
5
5
5
3
3
3
2

L
2
2
2
2
4
4
4
5
5
6

Pet.
.714
.714
.714
.714
.429
.429
.429
.375
.286
.250

TODAY'S GAMES

Ohio State at MICHIGAN
Wisconsin at Iowa
Purdue at Illinois
Indiana at Northwestern
Minnesota at Michigan State

I

SS396

THREE FROM THE
U of M JAZZ BAND

And a new Turbo Hydra-Matic transmission for the driving man.

I

I

I

III

I

II

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan