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February 17, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-17

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FRIDAY,-FEBRUARY 17, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1967 THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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NCAA tt
Text of Dr. Plant's Tele ram
(EDITOR'S NOTE: The following is the complete text of the
telegram sent by NCAA President Marcus L. Plant to Theodore W.
Kheel, head of the Sports Arbitration Board, yesterday. The entire
statement is appearing exclusively in this morning's Daily.)
rO: Theodore W. Kheel
New York, New York
This concerns your recent letters following up the AAU's sugges-
tion that a private meeting should be held between the new presidents
of the AAU and the NCAA as a means of possibly finding a solution
to this nation's long-enduring track and field problems. My response
Is made with full appreciation of your prolonged efforts and those of
your fellow Board members.
I think that no final resolution of the track and field dispute
Dan be accomplished successfully without all involved parties playing
a part in the development of the solution. More important for the
moment, however, I see absolutely no purpose of a meeting with AAU
officials until they correct their flagrant violations of the moratorium
provisions of the Resolution adopted by the Senate of 'the United
States and take further steps to confine their acceptance of the
juristdiction of the Sports Arbitration Board.
This is to request formally that the Board take immediate steps
to enforce the moratorium and order the -AAU to withdraw its various
threats of suspension and cancel those suspensions which it has im-
posed, the latter of which all apply to students at colleges of this
Association. These athletes have not, repeat, not been suspended by
any foreign agency, but have been declared ineligible by the AAU of
the United States.
Furthermore, by this action the AAU has injected into the dispute
an entirely new issue, namely that they can dictate to the educational
Institutions the eligibility status of properly enrolled students. This
intrusion into educational administration will not be tolerated by the
University of Michigan or other member institutions of the NCAA.
I find the AAU's threats of reprisal against athletes and meet opera-
tors during the past three weeks thoroughly reprehensible.
In conclusion, let me state that before any further meetings shall
be held in which the NCAA participates the following conditions are
specified :
First, the AAU must remove all ineligibility rulings which it has
announced and also rescind its orders restraining competition which
violate the very basis of the Senate moratorium and the action
creating your Board.
Second, the AAU must confirm its acceptance of the Board's
jurisdiction. On two recent occasions the AAU Executive Director has
stated that the AAU's rules and interpretations supersede the Board's
authority (See New York Daily News, February 7, 1967, and Associated
Press New York Dispatch, February 13, 1967).
If the AAU declines to accept the basic premise contained in the
United States Senate Resolution prohibiting any' restraint on com-
petition, then I see no other course left open to all of us other than
to return the issue to the Congress. I might add that the colleges have
endured too long the moratorium's suspension of their traditional
responsibility to approve the forms of competition in which their
students participate, and it is impossible to stand by and view these
arrogant violations of the moratorium when we are restrained by
observance of the moratorium. If the Board declines to enforce or is
unsuccessful in the enforcement of the moratorium, then we must
assume it is not applicable to either party.
Marcus L. Plant, President
National Collegiate Athletic Association

acks
By BOB McFARLAND
Dr. Marcus- L. Plant, President
of the National Collegiate Athletic
Association, said yesterday in a
telegram sent to Theodore W.
Kheel, head of the Sports Arbi-
tration Board, that the NCAA
would not meet with Amateur
Athletic Union officials "until they
correct their flagrant violations of
the moratorium provisions of the
Resolutionadopted by the Senate
of the United States."
Plant's telegram, the original
text of which is printed exclusive-
ly in The Daily, is the latest ac-
tion in the dispute between the
NCAA and the AAU over control
of amateur track and field in the
United States.
It is a response to the AAU sus-
pension of nine foreign students
this week for participating in the
United States Track and Field
Federation Invitational last Fri-
day night in New York. Among the
athletes affected by the AAU dec-
laration are John Reynolds of
Canada and Alex McDonald of
Jamaica, both members of the
Wolverines record-breaking two-
mile relay team.
No AAU Sanction
Because the USTFF. track and
field arm of the NCAA, did not
request that the AAU sanction the
New York meet, the union an-
nounced that foreign athletes,
whom it claims are properly under

AAU

Violations

its own jurisdiction, would be in- further meets. "First," the tele-

eligible from further AAU com-
petition. The AAU notified the
nine cinderman involved by tele-
gram of their current status.
Plant, a University law profes-
sor, pointed out to Kheel that
"these athletes have not, repeat,
not been suspended by any for-
eign agency, but have been de-
clared ineligible by the AAU of
the United States."
This particular statement is an
answer to an AAU contention that
the matter was out of their hands
efter they had suspended the nine
collegians Col. Don Hull, executive
secretary of the AAU. had assert-
ed that any further action would
have to be forthcoming from the
athletes' home countries.
Kheel Receives Telegram
Kheel reported last night that
he had rec3eived the communica-
tion from the NCAA president. He
said that his five-man arbitra-
tion board, appointed by Vice
President Hubert Humphrey to
settle the long-standing disagree-
ment, would make a ruling on the
matter and inform the parties in-
volved of its decision by 9 a.m.
EST this morning.
The Sports Arbitration Board's
conclusion will be handed down at
an 11 a.m. press conference.
Plant set down two conditions
to be met by its rival body before
the NCAA would consent to any

gram read, "the AAU must re-
move all ineligibility rulings
which it has announced and also
rescind its orders restraining com-
petition which violate the very
basis of the Senate moratorium
and the action creating your
Board.
Must Accept Jurisdiction
"Second, the AAU must confirm
its acceptance of the Board's jur-
isdiction." Plant's latter point re-
fers to AAU declarations earlier
this month, including one this
week, that it might ignore recom-
mendations of Kheel's board.
Much disagreement has center-
ed around whether the SAB is
empowered to merely mediate the
controversy or arbitrate it. The
NCAA contends that the Board's
decisions should be binding, while
the AAU has looked at the body
as a mediating group.
If the AAU does not meet the
conditions stated in Plant's tele-

gram. the ramifications could be
significant, The NCAA head has
threatened, first of all, "to return
the issue to Congress." One
USTFF official has indicated that
this could include antitrust action
by the collegiate group against
the AAU.
End of Moratorium
In recognizing the moratorium
1y the Senate resolution, the NCAA
has refrained from sanctioning
competition for collegiate thin-
clads, thus attempting to avoid
possible strife. Unless the SAB
can effect an immediate solution
to the present crisis, Plant said
that "we must assume it (the
moratorium) is not applicable to
either party."
If the NCAA does adopt this
premise, it seems likely that a
boycott of AAU competition would
be a likely result. Thus, an un-
easy truce appears on the brink
of exploding into out-and-out war
again.

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