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February 16, 1967 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAG 1fE SIXA

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1GyY,67

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I'AflU! ~IX TINE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 16~~,$67

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bought

Byers States Stand
As Feud Continues

Honig Guides

Frosh
year, I would have had to inten-1

Gagers
Honig points out. He also has

Sesquig raS
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your
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superbal I
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KANSAS CITY U) - Walter
Byers, executive director of the
NCAAA, said yesterday that for-
eign students athletes suspended
by the AU are eligible to partici-
pate in 90 per cent of the track
and field meets in this country.
"AAU competition represents
less than 10 per cent of the track
competition in America," he said,
and the suspended athletes are
eligible to compete in all meets
sponsored by the U.S. Track and
Field Federation. The USTFF is an
arm of the NCAA-the National
Collegiate Athletic Association.
Byers called a news conference
today to state the NCAA's position
in the latest flare-up of the long-
standing feud between the NCAA
and the AAU over who should gov-
ern the nation's track and field
programs.
The new outbreak followed sus-
pension by the AAU who took part
in the USTFF Invitational Indoor
Track Meet in New York last Fri-
day night.
In New York yesterday Col.
Donald Hull, executive director of
the AAU, said the Athletes "are
primarily in trouble with their
own governing bodies."
Hull said: "There is nothing we,
can do here. They got word from
their own athletic associations not
to participate in unsanctioned
competition."
But Byers said that isn't true.
"These foreign-born students have
not, and will not, be ruled in-

WALTER BYERS

U

eligible by their native countries,"
Byers said. '
"We already have information
from at least two nations precisely
to that effect."
Byers said the nations are
Greece and Ireland.
Byers also said that he had
talked to athletic officials at all
but one of eight colleges attended
by suspended students. He said he
had learned that only students
from England and Ireland had re-
ceived any kind of communication
from their native athletic associa-
tions, and these -were not notices
of ineligibility.
Byers said 11 foreign athletes
participated in the New York meet
Friday and the AAU had sent tele-
grams of suspension to nine.

By JOEL BLOCK
"The only difference between
him and us is that he's smaller,"
said a freshman cager half-jok-
ingly while eating at the Ohio
Union after last Saturday's game.
He wasn't referring to 5'10"
frosh guard Steve Fishman.
It was 5'10" frosh coach Richard
L. Honig.
At first look, the only difference
between Honig and most of the
freshman cagers is his lack of
height.
His collegiate basketball playing
experience was limited to just one
month on Michigan's varsity team
,when he was a sophomore.
Two-Time Winner
Honig did play three years for
Detroit McKenzie and made All-
City guard in his senior year. But
he alsomade the All-City base-
ball team as a shortstop, an
achievement which put him in a
dilemma when he came to Mich-
igan in 1959.
"I wanted to play both baseball
and basketball in college if I
could. But after playing on both
freshman baseball and basketball
teams, I realized I would have to
make a decision between the two,"
remembers Honig.
Honig's crystal ball told him to
elect baseball, but the choice
wasn't purely accidental. "I was
told that there would be a pos-
sible opening at shortstop for my
sophomore season so I started
thinking seriously about concen-
trating on baseball."
The American Game
He ended up staying on the
varsity basketball team only a
month his sophomore year. But he
found success in baseball, start-
ing at shortstop every game for
the 1961 Big Ten champion Wol-
verines.

t
r
tC
i
1

tionally flunk a course to stay in served as referee for high school
school," explains Honig. "I had games in the Ann Arbor area for
accumulated more than enough the past few years.
hours to graduate (he ended up In switching to his new post,
with 136), so I decided not to wait Honig has found only minor dif-
another year to graduate." ficulties. "I think I have a good
Right after getting his educa- enough knowledge of general
tion degree, Honig went right to basketball strategy. But at the be-
work for his ex-mentor, Moby ginning of the year I had to sit
Benedict, as assistant baseball down with George (Pomey) and
coach. After three years of coach- Dave (Strack) to learn about the
ing baseball, he got his chance to various warm-up drills which they
coach basketball this year. use."

I

DICK HONIG

Honig also started the next year
and hit .345 in the Big Ten. Mich-
igan didn't capture the conference
title that year; Illinois beat them
out by a game. Instead, they went
from an at-large berth in the
NCAA tournament all the way to
Hawaii where they won the In-
ternational Amateur Champion-
ships.
In 1963, his senior year, Honig
was hit on the wrist in the first
Big Ten game of the season. The
broken wrist kept him out of the
line-up for the rest of the year,
but he had to turn down a pos-
sible extra year of eligibility be-
cause of unusual circumstances.
"In order for me to get another

"Assistant coach Jim Skala left,
the staff around the beginning of
November this y e a r," relates
Honig. "Since his resignation came
so close to the upcoming basket-
ball season, the Board in Control
of Intercollegiate Athletics de-
cided to wait a year until select-
ing a permanent varsity assistant
coach."
Consequently, George Pomey,
who was to have been the new
frosh coach this year, was moved
up to varsity assistant while
Honig was given temporary charge
of the freshmen cagers.
Even though his only varsity
playing experience consists of a
one month stretch while a sopho-
more, Honig has been around
Michigan basketball throughout
all eight years he's been connect-
ed with Michigan. He was in
charge of taking the films for
Michigan basketball while he was
serving as assistant baseball coach.
"I took over the freshman prac-
tices for Tom Jorgensen (last
year's frosh coach) when he was
out of town on a scouting trip,"

Honig's chance selection this
year as freshman basketball coach
was t o t a 11 y unexpected. But
strangely enough, it fulfilled one
of his high school wishes.
"When I was playing both base-
ball and basketball in high school,
I wanted to coach basketball
rather than baseball. I felt that
there was nothing to baseball on
the high school level and always
had my hopes on coaching a high
school basketball team."

Big Ten Standings

1

W L Pet.
Northwestern 5 2 .714
Indiana 5 2 .714
Iowa 5 2 .714
Michigan State 5 2 .714
Purdue 3 4 .429
Illinois 3 4 .429
Wisconsin 3 4 .429
Ohio State 3 5 .375
MICHIGAN 2 5 .286
Minnesota 2 6 .250
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Iowa 80, Northwestern 75
Wisconsin 85, Minnesota 75

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Pro Standings

NBA
Eastern Division
W L Pct. GB
Philadelphia 54 10 .844 -
x-Boston 45 15 .750 7
New York / 31 34 .477 231/
Cincinnati 27 34 .443 25%f
Baltimore 16 48 .250 38
Western Division
San Francisco 37 26 .587 -
St. Louis 30 32 .484 61/2
x-Los Angeles 26 34 .433 9112
Detroit s 24 38 .387 121/
Chicago 23 42 .354 15
x-Late game not included.
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 129, New York 118
Philadelphia 127, Detroit 121
Boston at Los Angeles (inc)
NHL
W L TPt4. GF GA
Chicago 30 11 8 68 182 116
New York 23 19 8 54 138 130
Montreal 21 20 7 49 125 126
Toronto 19 21 9 47 126 148
Detroit 21 26 3 45 158 162
Boston 14 31 7 35 129 176
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Toronto 6, New York 0

By KIM KENDALL
The boys can keep their little
good luck charms and their pre-
match rituals. But the coach isn't
superstitious himself. The polka
dot tie around his neck for every
meet is just a precaution. "I don't
believe in taking chances," he ex-
plains.
Coach Cliff Keen will take that
same safety device off his tie rack
this weekend as the Wolverine
wrestlers meet Illinois at Cham-
paign and Purdue in West Lafa-
yette.
The Friday - Saturday matches
will climax a week in which the
undefeated grapplers will have met
four Big Ten teams, a strain
which may influence' their per-
formance this weekend.
"It's not the physical phase of
so many meets so close together,"
Keen commented, "as much as it
is getting ready for those four
matches. Putting them together
may be more than we can digest
at one time."
The typical coaching philosophy
that confidence may evolve into
laxity cornered Keen into evaluat-
ing both the Illini and the Boiler-
makers as "good teams," although
they are far behind Michigan in
conferencse standings. He explain-
ed that so-called easy matches
See Kaiser Aluminum's eyeball-
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-- I

ternoon match with Purdue. "This
is to our disadvantage!' said
assistant coach Rick Bay, "since
the team won't have much of a
chance to warm up after a long
ride."
Boilermaker power depends up-
on two senior stars. In the 125-
pound division, Larry Katz, Pur-
due's lone entry in last year's
NCAA meet, is scheduled to clash
with Michigan's Bob Fehrs. The
only Black and Gold placement
in the Big Ten meet since 1964 is
this year's captain, Ralph Trail,
who was sidelined last year with
a shoulder injury. His 130 pounds
will place him in Geoffrey Hen-
son's territory.
While the Purdue meet should
not prove to be a fierce battle, in
sports only the unpredictable is
predictable, and K e e n credits
Boilermaker potential.
"It's the hungry dog who catch-
es the rabbit,' added Keen.
So, although Michigan is strong-
ly favored in both upcoming
matches, outside factors could
shatter predictions. An epidemic
of jaundice could break out. One
of the station wagons could run
out of gas.
Or Cliff Keen could forget his
polka-dot tie.
BIboard
There will be a Tang Soo Do
karate session tonight in Wat-
terman Gym, 7-9.

DAVE PORTER

are a definite disadvantage, a
rugged schedule produces a rug-
ged team, that "we don't train
well on milk toast-we need raw
meat."
The meat of Illini strength lies
in Bob Loffredo and Jerry Pillath.
Loffredo will be pitted against
Wolverine Fred Stehmen at 152,
and Pillath will wrestle NCAA
champion Dave Porter at heavy-
weight. With only eight return-
ing members of last year's squad,
a conspicuous gap in the 130-
pound division with Don Jeffry's
graduation, and a contest against
the powerhouse of Big Ten wres-
tling, Illinois will be fighting up-
hill. But as Coach Keen empha-
sized, "You never can tell."
The Michigan team arrives en-
masse in West Lafayette in two
cars just before the Saturday af-

I

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