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February 05, 1967 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-02-05

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PAGE TWO

THEfl MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 5, 1967

COLLEGE SURVEY:
Favor Non-Military Service,
End of Student Deferments

Sixty-three per cent of the col-
lege students in a nationwide opin-
ion sampling believe they should
not be deferred from the draft so-
lely because they are students.
Seventy-five per cent would wel-
come alternatives to military serv-
ice such as the Peace Corps, the
Teacher Corps or Volunteers in
Service to America (VISTA).
The sampling was made by the
U.S. National Student Association
in a poll of 30,500 Students at 23
colleges and universities.

Other findings reveal:
1 68 per cent believe military
conscription is necessary at times
ether than a national emergency.
* 68 per cent are not satisfied
with the current Selective Service
system.
! 6 per cent favor a draft lot-.
tery ssytem as they understood it
would work.
0 90 per cent said the nation
can justifably call citizens for
military conscription:
Nearly eight out of ten teen-

LBJ's Draf tCommission
To Report Within 2 Weeks

WASHINGTON (P) -The Na-t
tional Commission on Selectivec
Service will present a voluminous
study of the draft to Presidenta
Johnson within two weeks, sources
said Thursday. The commission
had originally been ordered to re-s
port by Jan. 1.
"We are late but I'm not em-e
barrassed," one official said.i
"We've been looking over the1
Issues pretty carefully."c
Many of the commission's key
decisions were reached duringF
meetings in December and early
January, this informant said, but
the actual writing of the reportt
was delayed.
.Johnson set up the 20-memberr
commission last summer in thef
wake of student protests and dis-t
satisfaction with the draft. He
named Burke Marshall, formers
Justice Department .official, as di-1
rector and ordered the commissionc
to make an exhaustive study oft
the Selective Service.f
Johnson told Congress in his
State of the Union message Jan.
10, "We should modernize our
Selective Service System."1
After he receives the commis-
sion's report, the President told the
legislators, "I will send you new
recommendations to meet our mil-
itary needs, but let us resolve that
this is to be the Congress that
made our draft laws as fair and as
effective as possible."
Sources said the commission, in
meetings last year, quickly ruled
out any radical changes in the
present system-such as the pro-
posed alternatives of a standing
professional army or a widespread
national service program.
The report is known, however,
HOW MANY
LOVES DOTH A
WOMAN HAVE?
If she's the modern "sitched-on-
supper hippy type, you can bet
she has a "panty-load" of them-
Her darling little husband, her
growing family, her exciting career
-all testing her beauty and wits.
That's why she reads KOZMO-
POLITAN. Helpful advice columns
like "Ask Lurleen Wallace" and
"So You Want To Have a Bigger
Bosom" keep her up to date in to-
day's competitive world. Fascinat-
ing new non-fiction like the con-
troversial "Secret Love of Millard
Fillmore" challenge her intellect
and give her a real historical per-
spective. And informative articles
like "What the Girls Do" gives the
whole shocking, shocking story
about the shocking sex on our
shocking college sex - ampuses.
Must reading for every mother with
a daughter to love.
READ KOZMOPOLITAN - A
SPECIAL FREE ISSUE IS TUCKED
AWAY iN EACH REGULAR SIZE
ISSUE OF THE GARGOYLE. COM-
ING.TO CAMPUS FEB. 8th.
TONIGHT
Akira Kurosawa's
THE
LOWER
DEPTH

1957. Japanese,
subtitles.
Gorky's classic

to call for an extensive shakeup
of the draft system and for setting
up national standards for student
and other deferments to reduce
inequities.
There have been reports that
some form of a modified lottery
will be proposed. Sources indicat-
ed such a proposed lottery would
involve only those youths classified
1-A. Deferments would continue
under the present basis.
A lottery plan proposed by Sen
Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass)
and others would assign a number
to all 18-year-olds found fit by
their local draft boards. Those.
who received educational defer-
ment would - after graduation
from college-go right back into
the lottery pool.
Commission members are known
also to have seriously debated the
Pentagon suggestion that the or-
der of draft be reversed to begin
taking 18- and 19-year-old youths
instead of the older men first.
Secretary of Defense Robert S.
McNamara told Congress in his
annual defense posture statement
that draft calls over the next 18
months will continue high. He said
that about 17,000 youths will be
inducted each month through this
June, and about 24,000 will be
drafted; monthly in the following
12 months.

agers in American high schools
favor the United States adopting
a National Service Program under
which they would be drafted for
involuntary service in non-military
activities, according to a nation-
wide ploll among junior and sen-
ior high school students conducted.
by Scholastic Magazines.
Seventy-seven percent of all
students polled favor such in-
voluntary service. Of the total
number of boys polled, 56 per cent
said they would still opt for mili-
tary service; less than a quarter
(23%) said they would choose
non-military activities (such as
the Peace Corps, Medical Corps,
VISTA, Job Corps or related pro-
grams) if available; and 18 per
cent were undecided.
Draft for Women
Involuntary service for women
was favored by 46 per cent of the
high school female students inter-
viewed. Such involuntary national
service for them should include
"tasks of protecting, conserving
and developing our country or
those countries we wish to aid."
Fifty-two per cent of more than
2,500 selected students queried an-
swered "yes" to the question:
"Should every ablebodied Amer-
ican boy 18 years old be required
to go into the Armed Forces for
at least one year?" Thirty-two
per cent answered "no," and 14
per cent had no opinion.
If a National Service Program
were adopted, 52 per cent of the
boys said they do not think non-1
military service should be any
longer than military service.
Lottery System
Only 20 per cent favor a lottery
system, and 30 per cent have no
opinion.
Students against a lottery sys-
tem list four main objections: 1)
It would substitute chance for
judgment (52%); )2) It would
not provide a fair hearing for de-
serving individuals (52%); 3) It
would be no improvement over the
present ssytem (47%); and 4) It
would no enable the Armed Forces
to have the men they want (41%).

The Week T
SUNDAY, FEB. 5
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Akira Kurosawa's "The
Lower Depths" -in the Architecture
Aud.
MONDAY, FEB. 6
8:30 p.m.-Original compositions
will be presented by School of
Music on North Campus at Recital
Hall.
TUESDAY, FEB. 7
4:10 p.m.-Prof. Kenneth Bould-
ing of the economics department
will lecture on "Impressions of the
Russians at Pugwash" in Room
200, Lane Hall.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild
Experimental Film Series Program
will show the films "Dog Star
Man: Prelude," "Breathdeath"
and "The Brig" in the Architec-
ture Aud.
8 p.m.-The Russian Club will
show the movie "The Inspector
General" in Russian with English
subtitles in the Multipurpose Room
of the UGLI.
WEDNESDAY, FEB. 8
8 p.m.-University Players will
present Arthur Miller's "Incident
at Vichy" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Symphony Band,
conducted by William D. Revelli,
and the Ithica College Band, con-
ducted by Walter Beeler, will play
a public concert in Hill Aud.
THURSDAY, FEB. 9
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
show Orson Welles' "The Trial"
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-University Players will
present Arthur Miller's "Incident
at Vichy" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m.-The Michigan State
University Concert Band, conduct-
ed by Leonard Falcone, and the
University of Minnesota Concert
Band, conducted by Frank Ben-
criscutto will give a public concert
in Hill Aud.
FRIDAY, FEB. 10
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will

) Come: A Campus Calendar ['

Dial 8-6416

4 -ia

Holding Again!
4th Week!

show Orson Welles' "The Trial"
in the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-University Players will
present Arthur Miller's "Incident
at Vichy" at Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - The University of
Montana Concert Band, conduct-
ed by David Whitwell, and the
Ohio State University Symphonic
Band, conducted by Donald Mc-
Ginnis, will give a public concert
in Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, FEB. 11
10 a.m. - The Luther College
Concert Band, directed by Weston
H. Noble will give a public concert
in Hill Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present Ingmar Bergman's movie
I1

I

SORRY, "FALSTAFF,"
Your American Premiere
Will Simply Have To Wait

Phone 482-2056
Entrance On, CARPENTER ROAD
FIRST OPEN 5:30 P.M. FIRST
RUN NOW SHOWING RUN
FREE HEATERS
Shown at 10:15 Only
COLOR By DeLUXE rJ
Shown at 7:15 Only
PLUS-THIRD BIG FEATURE
"CURSE OF THE
LIVING CORPSE"
Shown at 8:50 Only

I

i

"Smiles of -a Summer Night" in
the Architecture Aud.
8 p.m.-University Players will
present Arthur Miller's "Incident
at Vichy" in Lydia Mendelssohn
Theatre.
8:30 p.m. - Western Division
Junior College Honor Band and
Arkansas Polytechnic College Band
will give a public concert in Hill
Aud.

I

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!-N.Y. TIMES
SCOLUMBIAPCIURES
ju MSON a0L Ns dPRave
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Sunday 5, 7, and 9
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,761-9700

HELD OVER
Shows of 1:15-3:05-5, 7and 9:00
"A SPLASHY, SURF-SOAKEU SLEEPER!
BREATHTAKING! IMAGINATIVE!
The nicest surprise to happen in a long time
Unless you just enjoy turning your back
entirely on life, you should not miss the
breathtaking shots!"11%k

A

"A BEAUTIFUL FILM"-The New Yorker
GRAND PRIZE WINNER
1966 CANNES FILM
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F suct BOW FILMIN ts

A Distinguished Company
Breathes Life Into
Shakespeare's Lusty Age *f

STARTING THURSDAY
AMERICAN
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2nd WEEK

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41
J'
HARRY SALTZMAN PRESENIS
AN ORSON WELLES FILM "FALSTAFF" rHIMES AT MIDNIGHT') STARRIG ORSON WELLES
JEANNE MOREAU-. MARGARET RUTHERFORO-JOHN GIELGUD. MARINA VLADY.KEITH BAXTER
DIRCTED BY ORSON WELLES -REL.EASED BY PEPPERCORN -WORMSER, INC. FILM ENTERPRISES

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TICKETS NOW!
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By ARTHUR ILLER I
Arthur Miller Describes
"Incident at Vichy"
By ARTHUR MILLER

I

The University Players' Box Office will open for the Arthur Miller
Festival in Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre tomorrow; box office hours will
be Monday and Tuesday, February 6-7, 12:30-5 P.M. and Wednesday
through Saturday, February 8-11, 12:30-8 P.M. The first play in the
Miller Festival, "Incident at Vichy," opens on Wednesday for a four-
day run. All performances are at 8 P.M. sharp!
(The following is an article on INCIDENT AT VICHY written by
Arthur Miller for The New York Times.)
By ARTHUR MILLER
"Incident at Vichy" is based on a true story told to me about ten
years by a friend of mine. It never occurred to me that it could be a
play until this spring (1963), when it suddenly burst open complete
in almost all its details. It has been called a play whose theme is "Am
I my brother's keeper?" Not so, "Am I my own keeper?" is more
.orrect.
I think most people seeing this ploy are quite aware it is not
"about Nazism," or a wartime horror- tale; they do understand that
the underlying issue concerns us now, and that it has to do with our
individual relationships with injustice and violence., It was not to set
forth a hero, either as a fact of history or as an example for us now,
that I wrote this play, but to throw some light on evil. The good and
evil are not compartments but the two elements of a transaction.
. .A'i

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