100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 31, 1967 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-31

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, JANUARY 31, 1967 THE MICHIGAN BAIJY

PAGE SEVEN

"

Quints

Eye

Tourney

By DAN OKRENT
As national basketball competi-
tion in the nation's colleges heads
into a fitful February of "last
chance" action, the various quin-
tets are beginning to jockey into
position for a slot on the early
line dope sheet for March's NCAA
tournament.
So what's new?
The yearly scramble 'for eleva-
tion into the two-week single
elimination tournament is a phe-
nomenon experienced every Febru-
ary as coaches, alumni, and stu-
dent bodies aim their teams to-
ward the "big time."
Some sweat it out for periods
of months, as those teams picked
for pre-season positions on the
various polls are pressed to live up
to their reputations. While others
come from nowhere to shock and
surprise the basketball world with
upset after upset, until their vic-
tories begin to be regarded as mat-
ters of course. Who stands where
in this vintage year of top squads
and stars?
Categorizing?
Well, a little categorizing is
necessary, as no prognosticator
can sift through the files of over
500 institutions rated as major
colleges without wandering astray.
So, looking strictly from the angle
of the NCAA regional tournaments,
it shapes up like this:
* East: This Atlantic Coast
breeding ground of small-school
big-team phenomena sends seven
delegates to the yearly battle, this
year's final being played in Louis-
ville. Standard positions are guar-
anteed conference champions from
the Ivy League, Yankee, Mid-At-
lantic, Atlantic Coast, and South-
ern circuits. The remaining spots
are granted to two of the East's
many independents, and there are
always good ones. Who's big so
far?
No Paper Tiger
In the Ivy League, all signs
point to Princeton. Eddie Hummer,
6'6", has paced Butch Van Breda
Kolff's Tigers to a 14-1 record
and fifth-ranged spot nationally.
Among the leaves of ivy, Prince-
ton is an oak. A sure bet for the
NCAA.
The Yankee Conference, peren-
nial donator of the tournament's
most unimpressive teams, is living
up to form this' year. Best bet
there is on Connecticut, an un-
likely team standing 10-3 against
mediocre competition, and paced
by an unlikely-named guard, Wes
Bialosuknia.
The Mid-Atlantic Conference,
who touted high-flying St. Jo-
seph's last year, could stand to
lose their tournament berth under
an option that provides for a
second independent entry if situ-

i
:: s
Y-S
!S, ?

BOB WYENANDT

ations deem it necessary. As it is,
St. Joe's (13-4) is top candidate,
even though they've beaten no one
important and have lost to some-
one very unimportant--namely an
88-68 decision to Fairfield.
Post-Season Battles
The ACC and the Southern Con-
ference fall into that category of
groups that pick their standard
bearers in a post-season tourna-
ment, entirely ignoring season
action. Top notices must go, how-
ever, to high-ranked North Caro-
lina in the ACC (leading chal-
lenger: always tough Duke) and
to either West Virginia or David-
son in the Southern .
Pre-tourney favorites for the
independent slots are high-flying
Providence (12-3), St. John's (13-
2) of New York, and Boston Col-
lege (10-1).
" Mid-East: The local region
sports six spots for the tourna-
ment. Conference kings from the
Big Ten, Southeast, Mid-Amer-
ican, and Ohio Valley conferences
will meet in the Evanston region-
als with two independents from
a particularly thin crop.
Best in the .. .
In the Big Ten, it seems to be
a two-way battle between North-
western and Michigan State, with
an outside chance given to up-and-
coming Iowa. The first two teams,
now standing 8-4 overall and 4-0
and 3-1 respectively in Big Ten
action, will meet on March 11, the
last day of conference action-in
what could be the deciding con-
test-at East Lansing.
Iowa, 9-4 overall and 2-2 in the
league, will be counting on Sad
Sam Williams to carry them to
Evanston-or farther.
In the Southeast, Vanderbilt
(14-2), with top scorer Bob seems
a shoo-in, as preseason favorite
Kentucky has fallen by the way-

t
l
I

side, struggling to keep its head
above the .500 mark. Tennessee is
rated an outside possibility.
Toledo Rockets to Top
In the Mid-American Confer-
ence, home of Wolverine van-
quisher Bowling Green, it looks
like the biggest runaway this side
of UCLA's ' Pauley Pavilion. The
nation's bigest positive surprise
(Kentucky's demise rates as the
biggest negative shock) is 60 miles
away in Toledo, where the un-
beaten Rockets are reigning forth
after their 15th consecutive vic-
tory. Discounting a major dis-
aster, which would make Western
Michigan the heir apparent, To-
ledo should float into the region-
als-where the effects of a weak
schedule will tell its tale in an
early-round defeat.
Last year, the tournament's
sweetheart team was the squad
from Western Kentucky. Back in-
tact from '66, the Hilltoppers have
lost but once (on opening day
against Vanderbilt) and should
make a triumphant return to the
NCAA's representing the weak
Ohio Valley.
Free Rides
Independents are the big ques-
tion mark in the Mid-East: Loy-
ola, Detroit, and Notre Dame have
done such an excellent job of
stinking up the place that it seems
that possibility Dayton will ride
into NCAA action without a part-
ner. Outside shots: Marquette and
Xavier, for want of better candi-
dates.
" MidWest: The nation's heart-
land can be counted on to provide
probably the best regional in the
nation, with six teams slated to
appear, including champs from the
Southwest, Big Eight, and, nota-
bly, the Missouri Valley. Iowa in-
dependents will slip in along with
Top 10 Results
Here's how the top ten teams
in The Associated Press college
basketball poll did last week:
1. UCLA, 15-0. beat Chicago
Loyola 82-67( beat Illinois, 120-
82.
2. North Carolina, 13-1, beat Vir-
ginia, 103-76.
3. Houston, 14-2, lost to Wash-
ington 81-78.
4. Louisville, 16-2, beat Bradley
81-68.
5. Princeton, 14-1, beat Penn-
sylvania 70-66.
6. Texas Western, 14-2, beat Ari-
zona State 56-50, beat Brigham
Young 87-85.
7. Kansas, 12-3, did not play. '
8. Western Kentucky, 14-1, did
not play.
9. Vanderbilt, 14-2, beat Missis-
sippi State 79-64.
10. Providence, 12-3, beat Se-
ton Hall 91-87 in overtime.

WALT FRAZIER

these winners; and this
two will be tops.
Southwest conference c
this year will be determinE
fault. Charlie Beasley--lI
boasting an 11-4 record
major victories, stands c
a group of midgets, none
have been able to mus
records in overall play. D
pect fireworks here.
Tall Corn
Similarly, the Big Ei
not grow hoopers like they
backs: The best team hei
doubtedly Kansas, the on
in the conference that
consistently strong on ti
woods. Cross-state rival
State seems to be the
challenge to the Cor
(12-3).
But then there's the
Valley, where centers g
wheat on the Prairie, whey
pion after champion grE
conference throne, where
of teams that fail to com
top end up in the NIT.
like this:
-Louisville: Number fo
nation, Wesley Unseld an
now stand 16-2, and see
back on the rise after two
defeats (one of these at th
of Southern Illinois, a tear
of NCAA competition but
ed from entrance because
rent classification as a mi
lege. The Salukis and 1
returnee Walt Frazier sh
through their college divisi
nament, where they have
past been consistent rur
to the now defunct E
dynasty.
-Cincinnati: After rac
eight early-season victor
Bearcats have come back
with three defeats in ti
nine games. But a team
14-3 record can't be count

Berths
-Bradley: Now 12-5, the boys
from Peoria have registered sev-
eral significant victories, including
triumphs over Cincinnati and
Tennessee.
More Indys
Two independents? This is the
easiest guess of any of the tourna-
ments open slots: Houston (14-2)
and defending champion Texas
Western (14-2), who rank in the
Top Ten of the nation.
If anyone is to challenge UCLA,
its bound to be someone from the
Mid-West. with thraee of the na-
tion's top six teams lodged in that
area.
9 Far West: What can you say
about the Far West, where they
{r could field an all-star team from!
one campus alone? Well, you could
say that UCLA, ranked number
one and undefeated this year, is
all you have to mention, being a
sure thing in the AAWU. But in
year, the all fairness, there are five others:
-Western Athletic Conference:
andidate Brigham Young, last year's NIT
a die champs and the team that refused
ed by de- to play a rescheduled game in
with no Chicago this weekend because the
nt from Mormon religion prohibits action
u mon Sunday, almost looked ready
of whom to be replaced from conference
on't ex- dominance by Detroit's Mel Dan-
iels and his New Mexico team-
'mates Now 11-5, the Lobos have
proven prey to a zone defense, and
ght does have dropped four in a row, clear-
Y do full- ing the way for BYU.
re is un- -WCAC: U. of Pacific seems
ly school to be the first top team to come
remains from this conference since San
he hard- Francisco captured two straight
Kansas national crowns with Bill Russell
greatest and K.C. Jones in 1954 and 1955.
nhuskers No competition looms big for Paci-
fic, now 12-3, with nine straight
Missouri wins to its credit.
row like Three independents will go to
re cham- the regionals in Corvallis. Oregon,
aces the most likely headed by Colorado
the bulk State and Utah State, with a pos-
e out on sibility of Houston repeating last
It looks year's shift from the Mid-West,
should the committee pass up
ur in the S e a t t l e-recently in recruiting
d friends trouble with the NCAA. If not,
m to be Seattle (13-3) will serve as ample
surprise competition for anyone but the
he hands Uclans.

All of a sudden, it stops looking funny.

If you think a Volkswagen Station
Wagon is just a funny-looking cor maybe
you never saw one fit in a space that
regular wagons have to pass by
and when you realize how much stuff
you could put inside that thing
like the Christmas someone drove one
to their mother's with six people and
the crib, the high chair, bicycles, lug-
gage, presents...room?
you couldn't ask for moreand on air.
cooled engine that won't boil over or

freeze up
and it starts in the morning 1-2-3
and when you stop at a gas station, $3
fills it up and you don't have to worry
about gas for maybe 3 weeks and
take kids for instance "Are we going
in the Volkswagen bus?" and they say
"Yayl" and clap their hands and if it's a
glorious day you can slide the sunroof
back
and let a little of the glory in and
all of a sudden, it stops looking funny.
wagen Inc.
761-3200 *AUTNO
Valter 0 Will Sexton
ppointments if desired
ry Available

m worthyl
restrict-
of cur-
inor col-
redshirt-
ould rip
on tour-
in years
nners-up
vansville
king up
ies, the
to earth
heir last
with a
ed out.

Scores
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Northwestern 100, Ohio State 77
Purdue 99, Tulane 84
Indiana 72, DePaul 70
Notre Dame 101, Butler 80
Auburn 87, Florida 61
Tennessee 67, Mississippi State 45
Princeton 97, Rutgers 74
Kentucky 96, Mississippi 53
South Carolina 80, Maryland 53
Marshall 73, Western Michigan 61
George Washington 71, VMI 66
Western Kentucky.101, Austin Peay 58
Georgia 73, Alabama 66
Vanderbilt 79, LSU 77
NBA
Boston 121, San Francisco 108
St. Louis 106, Los Angeles 99

Cooper Yolks
2575 S. State St.
Jim Westerman " Bill W
Don Coward'* Ai
Overseas Deliver

_______________- "-------.-'- -'------ I

+ Use, Dai~y

Cicassifieds +

'Cats Claw OSU, 100-77

7 By The Associated Press
Northwestern's Wildcats remain-
ed -the only undefeated basketball
team in the Big Ten last night
by humbling Ohio State 100-77 at
Evanston:
The Wildcats, scoring their
fourth victory without a defeat,
ran into trouble in the first half
as Ohio State remained ahead
nost of the way, although the score
was tied seven times.
Rallying late in the first half,
Northwestern took a, 42-39 lead at
intermission and quickly made it
50-43 early in the second half.
After that the Buckeyes, suffer-
ing their third Big Ten loss in
five games, never seriously tlreat-
ened.
With less than six minutes left
to play, Northwestern hammered
Its way to an insurmountable 82-
59 lead.
While Northwestern pounded in-

to its gigantic second half lead
only Jeff Miller hit with consis-
tency for the Buckeyes.
Bill Hosket of Ohio State led
all scorers with 27 points but
Northwestern flashed a balanced
attack led by ' Jim Burns and
Mike Weaver with 20 points each.
Elosket also topped al rebounders
with 18.

f
f
l
t
i

it

I

Noi
Mi(
Ind
Wi,
Illi
Ioi!
Put
Oh
Mi
MI

Big Ten Standings
W L Pet.
rthwestern 4 0 1.000
chigan State 3 1 .750
liana 2 1 .667
sconsin 2 2 .500
nois 2 2 .500
va 2 2 .500
rdue 2 2 .500
io State 2 3 .400
nnesota 1 4 .200
CHIGAN 1 4 .200

M
M
r
M
I

Professional Careers in Cartography
CIVILIAN EMPLOYMENT with the U.S. AIR FORCE
CREATING AEROSPACE PRODUCTS
Minimum 120 semester hours college credit including 5 hours
college level math. 'The required math must include at least 2
of the following: college algebra, trigonometry, analytic geom-
etry, differential calculus, integral calculus, or any course for
which any of these is a prerequisite. Equivalent experience ac-
ceptable. Training program. Openings for men and women.
Application and further information forwarded on request.
WRITE: College Relations (ACPCR)
Hq Aeronautical Chart & Information Center,
8900 S. Broadway, St. Louis, Missouri 63125
An equal opportunity employer
GENERAL MEMBERSHIP MEETING
TONIGHT-8 P.M., 3-G Union
EXEC. COMM., 6:30-Voice off.
Everyone Welcome,

r

i

Next week,explore.
" *
engineering
opportunities
as big as today's
brand new ocean
Talk with on-campus Career Consultant from Newport News
-world's largest shipbuilding company-involved with
nuclear propulsion, aircraft carrier design, submarine build-
ing, oceanographic development, marine automation, all
the challenging advances on today's brand new ocean. The
New York TIMES calls this "the last earthbound frontier"
with "profit possibilities as big as the sea."
Learn what our half-a-billion-dollar order backlog means to
you in terms of high starting salary and years of career
security with no lid on your future. With orders up
$80,000,000 in five months, our need Is urgent for imagiria-
tive men in all the disciplines listed here. Men who like
tough challenges and individual responsibility.
Ask about opportunities for advanced degrees and research.
We're next door to Virginia Associated Research Center with
one of the world's largest synchrocyclotrons, where grad-
uate engineers study high energy physics. We're across the
harbor from Old Dominion College, offering graduate
courses in Microwave Theory, Solid State Electronics, Nu-
clear Engineering. Nearby, too, is the Extension Division
of the University of Virginia offering courses toward credits
for masters degrees..And within easy driving is The Vir-
ginia Institute for Scientific Research, a world -leader in
solid state physics. Linked up with these opportunities,
Newport News offers scholarships, tuition grants, advanced
study and research leaves. Ask about them.
Get the facts on pleasant living and lower living costs here
in the heart of Virginia's seaside vacationland with its su-
perb beaches, golf, fishing, boating, hunting.

........ . ..

IMMEDIATE ENGINEERING CAREER OPENINGS

Mechanical Engineers
Electrical Engineers
Marine Engineers
Industrial Engineers
Systems Analysts

Naval Architects
Nuclear Engineers
Civil Engineers
Metallurgical Engineers

ILTrHI IIII

Tells it Like

I

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan