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January 25, 1967 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-25

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN^

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 1967 TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY

i is tp Ll Vv f Ll

Battered

Cagers

Relax

as

Season Reaches 'Limbo'

'Home-Happy' Hawks Hitch
Star to wolverine Tailspin

By HOWARD KOHN
Coach Ralph Miller went to Iowa
to get away from home. And
now he panics everytime he has
to go away from Iowa.
Miller was born in Chanute,
attended school at the University
of Kansas and coached at Wichi-
ta State--all Kansan prairie towns
within a 50-mile radius of each
other-before making the big move
to Iowa three years ago.
Last Monday night his Hawk-
eyes extended their home game
winning spasm to 19 games,
stretching over those three years,
by outlasting Michigan 91-81.
Animosity in the Air
"It's a tough place in which to
play all right," admits Michigan
Coach Dave Strack. "The crowd
climbs on you and they get things
going their way."

"They're hostile out there. They
never give the officials a chance,"
says ticket director Don Weir a
little more bluntly.
Michigan plopped in one more
field goal than the Hawks but got
wiped out at the free throw line,
29-17.
Miller's teams at Wichita State
were also renowned for their abil-
ity on a home floor. "I guess he
must get the crowd conditioned
to give his club a psychological
edge," adds Strack.
Even though they have their
own Palestra (Philadelphia) in
dead-pan Iowa City, the Hawkeyes
finished fifth in 1965, tied for third
last year and are only tied for
fifth with a 2-2 record this year.
Iowa lost all but one conference
road game last year and has been

rapped at Evanston and East Lans-
ing this season.
As the Big Ten rivals break for
semester exams, Northwestern re-
mains the lone unbeaten team in
the conference.
"I imagine Miller would like to
figure out the secret of winning
away games, too," sighs Strack.
Michigan, which won its 36th in
its last 39 games at Yost against
Michigan State Saturday, has al-
so been shot down everywhere else
-except for a pair of wins at
neutral site Los Angeles Coliseum
during the holidays.
"You'd like to think that after
playing so well on Saturday that
we could do the same thing on
Monday," reflects Strack. "But I've
seen a lot of Monday night games
look like this one. I guess there
is always an emotional letdown."
The Wolverines punched away
)r an early 18-14 lead, but Iowa's
two guards-Tom Chapman and
Chris Philips - tossed in jump
shots over Michigan's 2-3 zone de-
fense and shot the Hawks into an
18-point margin.
. Two days earlier, Strack's crew

had clamped the same zone around
the powerful Spartans and
squelched soph sensation Lee Laf-
ayette and friends.
"I'll admit that the zone is not
my favorite defense. I don't think
we'd ever set up the zone as our
basic defense," says Strack -
whose forte in the past three years
has been a shifting man-to-man.
"We had to switch out of the
zone against Iowa when we fell
way behind because you just can't
play catch-up ball with a zone,"
he emphasizes.
"Of course, we are ready to
change in a given situation. We
have to be. We have definite weak-
nesses in the man-to-man, espe-
cially on the boards, and we don't
stop the outside shots in the zone."
In its four Big Ten losses, the
Wolverines have allowed an aver-
age of 95 points per game. Strack
maintains that "it doesn't matter
how much the other team scores";
and that what counts "is the dif-
ference between the scores." But
he is also quick to point out that
scoring more points than the oth-
er team "is a helluva lot harder

when they have the ball all the
time."
Crash-Bang
After limiting their turnovers to
a minimum against Michigan
State, the Wolverines lapsed back
to tin-pan alley in Iowa City -
cheating themselves out of the ball
32 times.
"We don't handle the ball as
efficiently or as patiently as we
should," explains Strack. "We
committed so many errors in the
first half of the Iowa game that

we were helping them score."
Michigan, down 1-4 after tan-
gling with four title contenders in
five games, marches against Pur-
due a week from Saturday to start
its string of nine remaining games'
from the least imposing position
-last place.
In a brief analysis of the first
five games, Strack recalls his im-
pressions of each:
Northwestern (93-73, L): "We
were jittery and unconditioned.
They were poised and confident.

It was by far our worst game of
the season."
Wisconsin (98-90, L): "I'm still
sick over losing. But we did play
one of our best games. They just
played better. Whether or not we
could have won if Dennis Stewart
had played is problematic."
Illinois (99-93, L): "We faded
out in the second half on the
boards. We didn't even give them
a battle for the rebounds in the
last 10 minutes."
Michigan State (81-59, W):
"We played one helluva game!"

Iowa (91-81, L): "We couldn't
sustain our momentum in the sec-
ond half. We made the same mis-
takes over again."
But even in moments of poign-
ant reminiscing about the last
three years, Strack proudly credits
his new team "with working, real-
ly working . . . as hard as they
know how.
"In a way, we're going to start
a new season next week. We'll
cause some trouble in the stand-
ings yet, and we'll kick the hell
out of some teams," he predicts.

SUPER SOPH:
Hustling Galbraith Sparks M' Skaters

THE INDIVIDUAL AND HIS RELIGION
(A PSYCHOLOGICAL INTERPRETATION)
A seminar in religion, sponsored by the Office of Re-
ligious Affairs, and open to all students. The six
seminar sessions; led by Lloyd W. Putnam, will be de-
voted to a psychological understanding of the nature
and functioning of religion in the mature personality.
Basis for the presentations and discussions will be Gor-
don W. Allport's book, "The Individual and His Reli-
gion" (MacMillan paperback). Other selected readings
will be announced.
TIME: TONIGHT at 7:30
beginning January 19, 1967
PLACE: Guild House, 802 Monroe Street
January 26-The Religion of College Students
February 2-Attributes of Mature Religion
February 9-Conscience and Mental Health
(Religion and Psychotherapy)
February 16-The Nature of Doubt
February 23-The Nature of Faith
Sponsored by: The Office of Religious Affairs,
2282 SAB 764-7442

By DOUG HELLER
Galbraith takes a pass at center.
Galbraith's checked. Galbraith
shoots. Save. Galbraith recovers
in the corner. Shoots. Save. Gal-
braith tries a centering pass which
is knocked aside. Galbraith crosses
over and recovers in the other
Scorner. He skates over and tries a
shot, but pit's knocked aside.
One minute later, Galbraith tips
one across the crease.
No, this isn't a one man contest.
It's a Michigan hockey scrimmage.
It doesn't leave much doubt
about one of the reasons why
.~Michigan is 15-1-1.
Aggressive
The class of '69 has been good
to Wolverine hockey, and center
Doug Galbraith does nothing to
disturb this impression. And toj
state the obvious, his big asset is
hustle. He says that he was brought
up knowing he had to hustle and
adds, "I'm not the type who na-
turally happens to be where the
puck is. I have to work for every
chance I get. Otherwise I might
not get that much of a chance to
score."
And brother does he score. Not
only is Galbraith the third leading
scorer on the team with 11 goals
and 13 assists. But the first two
scorers, seniors Bob Baird with
38 points and Dean Lucier with 25
points, are both on his line. The
line has totalled 42 of Michigan's
111 goals this year.
Galbraith is a great admirer of
his wing mates' style. He praises
Baird because the right wing also
plays position hockey and provides
him with some terrific passes. As
for Lucier, he says "of course
everybody gets tired, and when I
do, Dean takes over."
The blond, crew-cut center grew
up in a litte town just outside of
Montreal-the heart of French
Canada. He recalls that he had
difficulty finding good hockey out-
side of the French school leagues.
When he first tried to join a
French league, "they told me I
had to pay 50c to join their league
because I didn't go to one of their
schools. I ended up being league
scoring champion."
Galbraith also remembers his
early ambitions. "When I grad-
uated from high school, I figured
that if I did nothing but play
hockey I might stand V chance of
someday making the NHL."
He chose an education, though,
and ended up at Michigan, after
an offer by Coach Al Renfrew.
Who's Better
In comparing his last league,
Junior A in Canada, with the

HAWKEYE TOM CHAPMAN (25) tips in a one-handed lay-up
despite interefrence from Michigan's Jim Pitts (24) in Monday
night's game at Iowa City. Wolverine Dennis Stewart (40)
watches in the background. Pitts was called for a foul on the play.

I

T

Big Ten Standings

l

Northwestern
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Indiana
Illinois
Ohio State
Iowa
Purdue.
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

W
3
2
2
2
2
2
2
1
1

L
0
1
1
1
2
2
2
2
3
4

Pct,
1,000
.667
.667
667
.500
.504
.500
.333
.250
.200

SOPHOMORE DOUG GALBRAITH pulls up short after slapping
in a goal against Minnesota earlier this season. Galbraith has
sharpened his shooting eye in recent games to jump into the
third leading spot among Michigan's scorers.

WCHA, Galbraith came up with
an observation that might be con-
sidered unusual by Americans.
In a game between a average
Junior A and an average WCHA
team, the college team might come
close or it might be a runaway for
the Junior A team." This has to
be qualified since the Junior A
emphasis is slanted toward hoc-
key and at Michigan it is much
more on school.
Still there are advantages in
favor of the WCHA. One is that
Galbraith considers that the play-
ers get up higher for each game
in college. "The season is shorter,
and each game means more."
At any rate, Galbraith recog-
nizes that an average WCHA team
and Michigan are not the same.
He notes a great amount of team
spirit and "the guys all like each
other and get along well."
Galbraith is the most consistent
scorer among the sophomores, but
he is quick to cite sophomores on
defense.
He mentioned Phil Gross "who
doesn't get a lot of publicity, but
every time we get in trouble he's
there with the puck. I don't know
how many goals he saved this
year."
Aside from his hustle, the most
noticeable thing about Galbraith
is his speed. To say the least, it
is deceptive. In fact, it even de-
ceives him, "I always thought of
myself as a slow skater, but here

they started calling me one of the
fastest skaters on the team."
So what is Galbraith besides a
speedy, hustling team player?
What else do you want?
Frosh Ie rs
Tackde MSU
This afternoon Michigan's fresh-
man hockey team will skate
against the Michigan State frosh
at 3:30 p.m. The admission is free.
Frosh Coach Alex Hood is pin-
ning his hopes on Dave Perrin.
Perrin is touted as the next "Mel."
Perrin, like Wakabayashi, is a
wingman from Chatham, Ontario.
Other highly regarded freshmen
are: defensemen Barney Paskuk
from Calgary, Ontario; defense-
man Pat Royane from Detroit, and
goalie John Puhy from Detroit.
Michigan, which is half-Cana-
dian and half-American, got off
to a slow start prior to the Christ-
nas vacation but has come on
strongly this semester.
Tomorrow's game is the first
ever scheduled by the freshman
hockey team. It is part of a home
end home series with the MSU
team. The series will be completed
next Wednesday night at East
Lansing.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
JOEL BLOCK

i

I i

I

Pro Standings

I

Let's talk
abOut a
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in banking
LET'S TALK ABOUT the American National
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LET'S TALK ABOUT a growth company-
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LET'S TALK ABOUT personal development
-. American National is fifth in size among
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LET'S TALK WITH an American National
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people-oriented men, the future leaders of the'
American National Bank and Trust Company of

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This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual material
as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
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Afternoon classes and evening classes in ACCELERATED READING will be taugh+ at
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BRING A BOOK!
DEMONSTRATIONS will be held at the BELL TOWER INN, located at 300 S. Thayer St.
(across from Hill Auditorium).
TUESDAY, January 24 at 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, January 26 at 7:30 P.M.
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TUESDAY, January 31 at 7:30 P.M.
THURSDAY, February 2 at 7:30 P.M.
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NBA
Eastern Division
W L Pct.
Philadelphia 46 5 .902
Boston 35 12 .745
New York 25 27 .481
Cincinnati 20 25 .444
x-Baltimore 12 40 .231
Western Division
x-San Francisco 31 18 .633
St. Louis 21 28 .429
Chicago 22 33 .400
Detrot 19 30 .388
Los Angeles 18 31 .367
x-Late game not included.
DeriYESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Cincinnati 126, New York 118
oston 11, Philadelphia 106
Dtot108, Chicago 95

GB
9
21/
23
34%2
10
12
12
13

SABBATH SERVICE
Conducted jointly with Beth Israel Congregation
Friday at 7:30 P.M.
RABBI JAMES I. GORDON
of The Young Israel Center of Oak Woods,
Oak Park, Michigan.
Member, Executive Committee,
Rabbinical Council of America
A W FW IflflI( AT

NHL
W L T Pts. GE GA
Chicago 23 11 6 52 142 100
New York 20 14 7 47 116 100
Toronto 17 15 8 42 106 114
Montreal 16 17 5 37 96 95
Detroit 16 23 3 35 125 138
Boston 11 23 7 29 103 141
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
No games scheduled
TODAY'S GAMES
Montreal at Toronto
Boston at New York

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