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January 24, 1967 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-24

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PAGV SIX[

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY JANUARY 24_ 1947

PAGE ST~ TINE MICHIGAN DAILY T1TF5~iT)AV JANTTARV 91 1O~
1---

a Vai 13"n, a. .l[s:,q IL) rm aai FY, 1.701

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--

ICERS STILL ON TOP:

LESLIE A. FIEDLER
~FINAL EVENT:,j
"The Last Usesl
of the
I ~University"
i ~Tues., Jan. 24, 1967
8:00 P.M.
Rackham Lecture Hall,
Reception following at the Union
Writer-In-Residence

Puckmen Put Icing On Midway Lead

By GRAYLE HOWLETT.
When Giant ace Gaylord Perry
had racked up an unbelievable
record of 20-2 last August, one
reporter asked him if before the
season he had expected such a
slate at that point in the cam-
paign. "Well," replied a dis-
gusted Perry, "I didn't think I'd
lose those two games."
Even though everyone should
be celebrating the Michigan hoc-
key team's 15-1-1 record, you still
have to act surprised.
"I guess I never thought before
the season we'd be this well along
in the middle of our conference
schedule," junior forward Bruce
Koviak offered, "but now that I
look back on it we should be 17-0.
We should have beat Denver and
I don't want to even talk about
that tie with RPI."
Bushed
What the Wolverines did want
to talk about was the series sweep
over Colorado College last week-
end in Colorado Springs, even
though they all seemed a little

tired. "We left Colorado at 3:00
in the morning after our Satur-
day night game," Coach Al Ren-
frew explained, "and when you're
playing a couple of games in that
high altitude out there, well-you
can see why we're tired."
Paul Domm, sophomore defense-
man, interjected that "we should
have stayed out there to rest up,"
referring , to the beautiful resort
area of Colorado Springs.
The Wolverines have two weeks
to "rest up," being idle this week-
end, before they tackle Michigan
Tech and Michigan State on suc-
cessive weekends,
Story Time
"These next two series should
tell the story," Renfrew com-
mented. "The fact that we're off
this weekend both hurts and
helps. We've been going good and
you're always afraid that in-
activity might stop your momen-
tum. But we can sure use the
rest."
The momentum Renfrew was
referring to was generated in the
icers' fourth and fifth straight
wins, their sixth and seventh in
the WCHA, as they held on to the
top spot in the conference.
"Both teams played well out in
Colorado," Renfrew stated, "and
our kids skated hard for the first
time in that altitude, and don't
think that's not a factor. We were
changing lines every minute and
a half or so, where here we can
run them for two minutes."
In Friday night's victory, sopho-
more netminder Jim Keough turn-
ed in his second shutout of the
season, and Bob Baird, Dean Lu-
cier and Lee Marttila provided

the goals in the Wolverines 3-0 back to the series with Michigan
whitewash. Tech coming up. "We played well
"It took us a couple of periods in spots against Colorado," Koviak
to get untracked," Renfrew men- commented, "but if we play like
tioned, 'but Keough came up with that against Tech we're going to
some great saves and the kids get knocked over. But I think we
skated back real well." all know this and we all know
Brother Act what we have to do."
Saturday night provided a little Renfrew added: "Whenever a
more offensive fireworks as the team gets hot you have to guard
Wolverines broke a 3-3 tie at the against the letdown. It happened
3:16 mark of the third period to us against Denver and we don't
on Mike Marttila's second goal want it to happen against Tech.
of the night, assisted for the sec- But because of the crucial nature
ond time by his brother Lee. of the series there shouldn't be
Ron Ullyot added a cushion at any letdown. We should all be up
the halfway mark of the last for it. It's all a question of being
stanza to give the icers their 5-3 ready, and in two weeks we should
win. Lucier and Ullyot got the be."
other two markers and Harold To Beat the Sick
Herman went all the way in theoheal the ko
twine, turning away 25 shots. Another advantage of the two
"We played a much stronger week layoff is that it should pro-
game Saturday," Renfrew ob- vide adequate time for healing.
served, and our offense really Paul Domm, who went into the
perked up. Plus, our defense is the Colorado series with a shoulder
starting to play better. We had injury, reinjured it Saturday night
many stars-the Marttila boys, but should be O.K. come the first-
Lucier, Ullyot, and Bill Lord. But face-off February 3. Koviak and
everybody had to skate well be- Lars Hansen also entered last
cause of the atmosphere out weekend's play with various ails,
there." but nothing serious developed and

7~

I

II

WCHA Standings

11

MICHIGAN
N. Dakota
Michigan Tech
Denver
Michigan State
Colorado
Duluth
Minnesota

W
7
8
4
5
4
3
3
2

L
1
2
3
4
5
4
8
9

T
0
0
1.
0
1
0
0
0

Pet.
.875
.800
.563
.556
.450
.429
.273
.182

Power Failures
Even with a 15-1-1 record, Ren-
frew could point to a weakness:
"Up until the last period of Sat-
urday night's game, our power
play hadn't been functioning well.
That period we pushed in two on
the power plays but we can still
work on it. I guess no matter what
your record is you think you can
play better. You never play the
perfect game."
Of course, all conversation seems
to shift away from Colorado and

they should be all right for the
Tech encounter. AL RENFREW
As Koviak said, "You know, we Critic and Coach
don't have too many games left
at home, and with the way we've know why they're staying away."
been going it's a wonder we I guess it takes a little time to
haven't had a sell-out yet. I don't get over the surprise of 15-1-4.
UCLA STILL ON TOP
Carolina Climbs in Poll;
Louisville Slips to Fourth

I

UNION-LEAGUE
RENT
FAMOUS

This Week inSports
FRIDAY
Track-Michigan-Relays at Yost Field House, 6:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Gymnastics-Illinois (Chicago Branch) at Sports Building, 1:30 p.m.
Track-Michigan Relays at Yost Fieldhouse, 1:30 p.m. & 6:30 p.m.
Wrestling-Michigan at Minnesota.,
Li- - - ~ -

I

Cottage Inn Pizzeria
SPECIAL

By The Associated Press
IThe unbeaten UCLA Bruins are
unanimous choices for the top spot
in the Associated Press' major
college basketball poll for the sec-
ond straight week. North Carolina
is the new runner-up while West-
ern Kentucky and Vanderbilt
moved in among the Top Ten
teams.
The Bruins collected all 39 first-
place votes in the balloting by a
national panel of sports writers
and broadcasters, while North
Carolina advanced from fourth
place in taking over the No. 2 spot
from Louisville. Houston held third
place and Louisville fell to fourth.
Princeton remained in the fifth
position.
UCLA, 14-0, downed Portland
122-57 and the University of Cali-
fornia at Santa Barbara 119-75
last week. North Carolina, Hous-
ton and Princeton were idle, but
Louisville, after defeating Dayton
66-50, dropped its second game of
the season, 59-58 to Cincinnati.
Texas Western remained in
sixth place' after beating Weber
State 72-38. Kansas, which lost
to Colorado and then beat Iowa
State, held seventh place.

Western Kentucky and Vander-
bilt, both unranked a week ago,
advanced to eighth and ninth, re-
,spectively. Providence, idle last
week, remained in 10th place.
Florida, No. 8 last week and
New Mexico, No. 9,slipped out of
the Top Ten. The Gators lost
twice to Tennessee while New

Mexico was beaten
Brigham Young.

by Utah and

-

4

YOU!-JOIN THE STAFF TODAY'

I

-Medium Pizza-one item

$125

U

NiON-LEAGUE CREATIV
PRE
II NT JER-ARTS

Spaghetti & Rolls... $1 .00
(all you can eat)
-12 Fried Chicken . .. $1.00
Salad and French Fries
(These prices not good for delivery)
Specials Good Mon.-Thurs.
512 E. WILLIAMS

1. UCLA (39) 14-0 390
2. North Carolina 12-1 279
3. Houston 14-1 269
4. Louisville 15-2 255
5. Princeton 13-1 233
6. Texas Western 12-2 206
7. Kansas 12-3 93
8. Western Kentucky 14-1 74
9. Vanderbilt 13-2 67
10. Providence 11-3 50
Others receiving votes, listed al-
phabetically: Boston College, Brad-
ley, Brigham Young, Cincinnati, Cor-
nell, .Dayton, Florida, Iowa, Missis-
sippi State, New Mexico, Northwest-
ern, St. John's (NY), St. Peter's
(NJ), Syracuse, Tennessee, Toledo,
Tulsa, University of the Pacific,
Utah State, Yale.
Scare
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Ohio State 82, Purdue 72
Florida State 81, Jacksonville 70
Virginia Tech 77, Pittsburgh 60
Florida 63, Georgia 61
Tennessee 52, Kentucky 50 (2 ovt)
American 76, Lafayette 69
Alabama 91, Mississippi State 74
New Mexico State 87, West Texas
State 68
Toledo 100, Evansville-90
Denver 115, Oklahoma City 99
NBA
Philadelphia 112, St. Louis 105
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR
DAN OKRENT

i

i

E ARTS FESTIVAL

!

Big Ten Standings

-SEN4TS

Northwestern
Michigan State
Wisconsin
Indiana
Illinois
Iowa
Ohio State
Purdue
Minnesota
MICHIGAN

W L
3 0
2 '1
2 1
2 1
S2
2 2
2 2
1 2
1 3
1 4

Pct.
1.000
.667
.667
.667
.500
.500
.500
.33
.250
.200

~1'

SYIMPO

- -

WITH

Engineers, Mathematicians:

EDWARD CHUDECOFF-MUSIC
MELVIN FELHEIM-LITERATURE
PROFESSOR ROBERT EGLEHART-

{
{
k

Contribute to Techni-
Programs of Natio..
Significance

"IN )
x4n e.ra,.a

I4

ARCHITECTURE

&

DESIGN

s

A

MRS. HANS KURATH-DANCE

WEDNESDAYJANUARY

25

lli

A

Creating secure communications systems
and equipments unknown anywhere else.
This is the mission of the National Security
Agency-a mission which in turn creates
problems of a high order of difficulty, re-
quiring an uncommon amount of ingenuity.
There is no other organization like it...
no other organization doing the same im-
portant work, or offering the same wealth
of opportunity for imaginative graduates in
mathematics or the engineering sciences.
A separate agency operating within the
defense establishment, NSA has a critical
requirement for:
ENGINEERS. To carry out basic and
applied research, design, development,
testing and evaluation of large-scale cryto-
communications and EDP systems. Engi-
neers may also participate in related
studies of electromagnetic propagation,

complex Comm unrcam..o,-re .e
problems in support of the NSA
mission. Statistical mathematics,
matrix algebra, finite fields, probability,
combinatorial analysis, programming and
symbolic logic are but a few of the tools
applied by Agency mathematicians. They
enjoy the full support of NSA's completely
equipped computer laboratory where many
of them often become involved in both the
hardware and software of advanced com-
puting systems. Theoretical research is
also a primary concern at NSA, owing to
the fact that the present state of knowledge
in certain fields of mathematics is not
sufficiently advanced to satisfy NSA re-
quirements.,
CAREER BENEFITS

MATHEMATIC
To define, formulate
mr m u ica

A

The "Cipher Disk" . .. NSA symbol
and one of the oldest and most effec-
tive cryptographic devices known.
associations and assists you to attend na-
tional meetings, seminars, and conferences.
Located between Washington and Balti-
more, NSA is also near the Chesapeake
Bay, ocean beaches and other summer and
winter recreation areas. The location per-
mits your choice of city, suburban or
country living.
Starting salaries, depending on educa-

7 30 P.M.

X A I to" UIro-A KI fDCnn K A I CrA 0"-"1 1

M,

111i ii

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