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January 19, 1967 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-19

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY} JANUARY 19, 1967

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY, JANUARY 19. 1967

I

OBSCENITY CHARGED:
'Art' Film Seized by Police

Ha To Voice Poems of Sound,
Grasp at the Heart of the Soul'

.w _ _ _ _- .___-- . _ ____._
- _._

(Continued from page 1)
fledged "student organization,"
thus possibly not entitled to Uni-
versity protection in court.
The University statement said:
"The film in question is one of
several titles selected by the Cin-
ema Guild, a student group, for
its Experimental Film series..
'The film was previewed by the
board of the Guild and by'an ad--
visor who is a member of the fac-
ulty, and they selected it for the
Experimental Series as represent-
ative of certain ideas and tech-
niques current in film-making.
The film most recently was shown
at Brown University in Rhode Is-
land.
Student Group
"The Cinema Guild, as a. stu-
dent group,. has use of Univer-
sity facilities. Any question of pos-
sible violation of civil ordinances
in showing this particular motion
picture is a matter to be deter-
mined through the normal legal
procedures."
There was evidently high stu-
dent interest in the film. The first
performance was sold out with
enough students still waiting for
admission to fill the Architecture
Auditorium a second time.
One sophomore girl called the
film "absolutely obscene and por-
nographic," but added that she
still thought it had some merit.
The audience vocally !protested the
halting of the performance.
Beyond Frankness
But it was evident that certain
scenes in the film went far beyond
even unusually' frank Swedish'
films such as "Dear 'John" and
"Night 'Games."
"Flaming Creatures" exposures
of total male and' female nudity
in an orgiastic context.
"As it happens, 'Flaming Crea-
tures' is not pornographic, if
pornography be defined as the
manifest intention and capacity

to excite sexually," said a review
of the film by Susan Sontag in the
Nation Magazine. "Smith's depic-
tion of nakedness and various sex-
ual embraces is both too full of
pathos and too ingenuous to be
prurient."
"The police hostility to the film
is not hard to understand," the
review added: "It is, alas, in-

have to fight for its life in the
courts .
Meanwhile, a group of students
announced they planned to hold
an .open meeting with Cutler in
his office at 2:00 today. The pur-
pose of the meeting is to discuss
University policy on the incident.
All interested students were in-
vited to attend.

evitable that Smith's 'film'

will

Film Seizure M~ay Instigate
Court Fight over Obscenity

By RICHARD PERRY
Donald Hall, with a robust phys-
ique and enthusiastic voice, repu-
diates the image of the poet as a
sallow, clerical looking man hold-
ing in one hand the Divine Come-
'dy and in the other a garland of
forget-me-nots.
Both in his physical energy and
in his professional disavowal of
the New Criticism in which he
was trained at Harvard, he is
typical of a group of younger
poets who have renewed audience
interest and enthusiasm in the
poet's voice and craft.
Professor of English at the Uni-
versity, Mr. Hall has been "neu-
rotically prolific," publishing three
volumes of verse, several short
stories, and the script to "An
Evenings Frost." In the interim
between 1962 and 1964, when he
composed no poetry, he neverthe-
less wrote a well-received study
of the art of Henry Moore.
In tonight's reading at the
UGLI multi-purpose room, 8:00
p.m., Mr. Hall promises to read
many new poems. Stylistically, he
says that his more recent writings
are "less pure, more surrealistic,
more wild" than his previous
works. "I hope the volume of

emotion is louder . . . Poetry is
catching up to what's happening.
It is grasping a more widely
shared consciousness of generally
experienced images.
Mr. Hall freely admits that his
new voice has been in part created
by the growing popularity of the
poetry reading, a form of enter-
tainment in which he has been
most vigorously involved.
"Instead of being as interested,
in the shape of the poem on the
page, I am seeking more an aural
impact. I want to move the list-
ener, even if he doesn't under-
stand. I want the poem to function
as noise. Yet I don't want to give
up the book, the printed page.
When asked if the poetry read-
ing may be in some way destruc-
tive to the more cogitative aspect

of poetry, Mr. Hall replied, "I
don't think so. I don't like the
conscious mind very much. The
mind is not as holy as the ear.
The ear and the eye go to the
heart of the soul."
Along with such poets as Gal-
way Kinnell, James Wright, Rob-
ert Bly, and Louis Simpson, Mr.
Hall has been vociferous in his op-
position to the Vietnam war, and
has participated in many read-
ings, "communal rededications"
against the military actions.

9 P.M.

1421 Hill St.

FRIDAY NIGHT
~'7ie XeaoTe4 Ao R t4
at The ARK

$1 cover charge includes all you can eat

I

(Continued from Page 1)
He said felony charges would be
based on a conspiracy to show a
movie previously known by the
exhibitors to be obscene.
Cinema Guild' officials indicated
that they had reviewed the film
before its showing and felt it was
not obscene. The film was banned
in New York state, but has re-
cently been shown at Brown Uni-
versity in Providence, R.I., and at
the University of Chicago..
A misdemeanor charge filed
against Cinema Guild as a cor-
poration would probably be aim-
ed at preventing the film from be-
ing shown again in Ann Arbor:
Staudenmeier indicated that the
film might be destroyed if charges
were upheld.
Viewed by Officials
He said.the film would be re-
viewed by .a board of the- county
prosecutor's. office in a closed
meeting this morning. He said 'the
board would make public "within
a few days" its decision on whether
the confiscation was justified and
what action would be.taken.
"If the board does not-find the
film, obscene, charges will be dis-
missed,' he said.
Members of the county prose-
cutor's office said they would not

comment on the case until their
office opened in the morning.
Ellen Frank, chairman of the
Cinema Guild board, said that if
charges were dismissed she would,
favor a counter-suit, probably
aimed at collecting damages by
failure to return the film to its
distributors on time, in lost rev-
enues from last night's scheduled
nine o'clock showing, and detract-
ing from Cinema Guild's reputa-
tion.
She also indicated a counter-
suit would involve an injunction
against police intervention of this
nature in the future. Goodman in-
dicated action of this nature would
probably involve federal litigation.
"'
Across
I
THURSDAY, JAN. 19
3:15 p.m.-A I r 1 i n e Schedule
Control Talk: Prof. Robert Simp-
son of Massachusetts Institute of
Technology will speak on "An
Application of. Network Flow
Theory to. Airline Schedule Con-
trol" in Room 229 of West Engin-
eering Building.
4:10 p.m.-History of Art De-
partment Lecture: Prof. John R.
Spencer of the Oberlin College art
department will speak on "Bronze
Doors in Renaissance Italy" in
Auditorium B, Angell Hall.
4:15 p.m.-University Linguist-
ics Club lecture: Prof. Kenneth L.
Pike will speak on "Phonems of
Particle, Wave and Field" in
Rackham Amphitheater.
7:00 and 9:05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild present "The Blue Angel"
in the Arch. Aud.
8:00 :p.m.-Donald Hall poetry
reading, UGLI multipurpose room.
FRIDAY, JAN.20
7:00 and .9:'05 p.m.-Cinema
Guild will present "The Blue
Angel" in the ,Arch. Aud.
8:30 p.m.-Dramatic reading by
Basil Rarthbone in Rackham Au-
ditorium. Admission $1.75.

ORGANIZATION NOTICES 111
s....1f.1 ::::..:...~~~~~~~...:. . ......... ..::}h"" ....r." ... .S ff..I J:".. .:.s.'f::"; }

"SUPERIOR OFF-BEAT, AND
ORIGINAL!-N.Y. TIMES
COLUBIA PCUS
JaMeSMs0N 300TSYNNW V
SUGGESTED FOR MATURE AUDIENCES
Thursday 7 & 9
Ith
Ann Arbor, Michigan
210 S. Fifth Avenue
761-9700

THIS WEEK:
TON IGHT &
TOMORROW
Joseph Von Sternberg's
THE BLUE
ANGEL
Marlene Dietrich,
Emil Jannings
SATURDAY & SUNDAY
Charlie Chaplin's
MONSIEUR
VERDOUX
with Martha Raye
Sunday night show
followed by
discussion with
Leslie Fiedler
7:0O& 9:-05
ARCHITECTURE AUD.
STILL ONLY 50c]

-
if

A

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially i
recognized and registered student or-
ganizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
Latin America Club, Open meeting
for Americans and non-Americans,'
Thurs., Jan. 19, 9 p~m., Room 3B, Mich-1
igan Union. For further information,
call Ed, 663-2070. *
U. of M. Chess Club, Meeting, Jan.i
20, 7:30 p.m., Room 3D, Michigan Un-
ion.
* * 4
Christian Science Organization, 'Tes-
timony 'meeting, Jan. 19, 7:30-8:30 p.m.,
3545 SAB.
College Republican Club,. TG-mem-
bers only, Jan. 20, 4-6 p.m., 404 N.
Thayer, Apt. No. 1. '
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Folk danee
with instruction open to everyone, Fri.,
Jan. 20, 8-11 p.m., Barbour Gym.'
-* * * .

Le, Cercle Francais, Le Baratin-enjoy
a French atmosphere. Thurs., Jan. 19,
3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg.
Engineering Council, Meeting, Thurs.,
Jan. 19, 7:30 p.m., Room 3529 SAB.
'*: . *- "
Viet Nam Club, Club..meeting to.in-
troduce club to new members, discus-
sion of proposed 'club activities, 'elec-
tion' of' officers, preview .of upcoming
exhibition, Thurs., Jan,- 19,. 8.p.m.,. In-
ternational Centers Anyone interested
welcome.
Hillel. Foundation,. Sabbath ,service,
'Dr. Michael Inbar, asst. professor of'
sociology on' Negro-Jewish relations;
Jan. 20, 7:15 p.m., 1429. Hill.
Guild House, Friday noon luncheon,
speaker-Leslie Fiedler, U. of M. writer
in' residence, Jan. 20, 12-1 p.ni., 'Guild
House, 802 Monroe.
*... * . *
Guild House, Friday evening dinner,
Jan. 20, 6 p.m., Guild House, 802 Mon-
roe. Call 662-5189 for reservations.

IIl

1

HELD

Sh -nt 1 -

NO 2-6264
TODAY

Feature at 1:00-3:00
5 :65-7:10-9 :15

1

THE LIQUIDATOR GOES
FROM ONE HOTBED OF
rINTRIGUE TO AOHR

OVER ! J-1 :-7:[0:,-9:00 PM
IN HIS NEW ALL-OUT ADVENTURE 1
MATT HELM OUTDOES MATT HELM
DEAN AN-
MARTINMARGRET
MAIHELM KARL MALDEN
CAMILLA SPARV-JAMES GREGORY-BEVERLY ADAMS

UAC MUSKET '67
@ur
A~tb~
the new musical

* Next*
"The Endless
Summer"
Coming
"ALFI E"

I

d

TICKETS:
* Individual Sales
start
January 16
Lydia Mendelssohn
Box Office
10 A.M.-5 P.M.
All Seats $2.50
Performances:
Date:
Fri.-Sun., Jan. 27-29
Wed.-Sat., Feb. 1-4
Time:
Fri. & Sat. Nights
7:00 & 9:30
All Other Nights
8:30

:.v~ r " "r v "rr.".: vv: .: ro: sgJ . ....:.:" ":...-_'_-
.. ............r: o: ."::.::::::: n":.:.::. :: r."::,":. :: ".": v vr:.

METRO-GOWDWYNMAYER ,ats,,as A LESUE EWOT PRODUCTION iAN,*. 'i"'' -
ROD TR HORD-JUtJOHN .,MTROCOWR
~THE LHQUHDATOR'
10,r R HIStu11rIdy "AIRIIViCIJBI-[RlSYESDER I, BATBYtIN
Starts Saturday: "ARIVEDERCI, BABY!"

!:i

r':
fir:
M1S,
rf
',ti'
,j'.

we're open during t )

he da

fy
:i'r:

LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

HELD

r 1 1=1 t T11

OVER! DIAL 8-646
"ONE OF
THE YEAR'S
10 BEST FILMS!"t
-Archer Winsten, N.Y. Post
GRAND PRIZE WINNER 1966

I.

IlF)BRBURY iFOT
330 Maynard

JAN. 27-29, FEB. 1 -4

Fi1

*
*

CANNES FILM FESTIVAL
A DAZZLING DISPLAY OF
VIRTUOSITYl--Saturday Review
A FREE, VIGOROUS CINE-
&*ATtf CTVEI F IfLIFNITS

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL
p r e s e n ts
ANDREW HILL QUARTET
UNION-LEAGUE
IN CONCERT
SATURDAY TICKETS ON SALE
8:30LP..M AT
":' LYDIA MENDELSSOHN

Ir

Ilil

1111I

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