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January 17, 1967 - Image 9

Resource type:
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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1967-01-17

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TUESDAY, ,JANVARY" 17, 1967

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAI"vr '193TVV

TUESDAY, JANUARY 17, 1907 TUE MICHIGAN DAILY WAf±W ~?Th.?U'

* A5..5r SlkY E h

Cagers Facing Uphill Battle

By DOUG HELLER
"We aren't the type of club
that's going to go. out and over-
power anybody. We've got to go
all out every minute."
So spoke: Michigan coach Dave
Strack after the Illinois disaster
Saturday, a statement which out
of context as it is here seems ripe
for sensationalistic interpretation,
especially with a sportswriting
equivalent of a Kremlinologist rid-
ing shotgun on a typewriter.
What can be said about a team
that was originally expected to
go nowhere (preseason rank in
Big Ten: seventh), looked very im-
presive for a young team against
Houston (now ranked number
four) and now,, three games into
the Big Ten season, has shown ab-
solutely nothing?
Disappointed
Strack said, "I was disappointed
in our performances in some of
the games but not the ones against
Wisconsin and Illinois." And now
the drive for perspective is begin-
ning to lose out. Strack said this
team would not be as bad as
everyone thought before the sea-
son, and now that they are losing
what at first glance seems to -be
very sloppily played ball games,
particularly the last one, he says
he isn't disappointed.
Michigan presents very close to
the same offense they had last
year for approximately the same
situation: guards that can't shoot
from the outside, one who would
much rather drive the baseline, a
very fine outside shooting center,
and at least one forward who also
likes to shoot from the outside.
Tall Guard
Center Craig Dill has been call-
ed by more than one person the
tallest guard in the. world. He does
seem to play. further outside than
Jim Myers did last year, at least
he did against Illinois, but this
is god strategy if a team is afraid
of the opposing center's rebound-
ing ability. But four rebounds for
Dill? And then, in the second half,
Illinois left Dill unguarded and
put the extra man on Jim Pitts,
who they obviously thought could
hurt them more. Thus while Pitts
was held to two second-half
points, Dill was even able to drive
in occasionally.
It has often been said that Den-
nis Stewart can look like the great-
est player ever to pick up a bas-
ketball, or something of that or-
der, but other times one wonders
if he really knows where he is.,
Leading Rebounder
Stewart, who everybody seems
to think should be board-crashing
like the graduated Oliver Darden,
did in fact lead the Wolverines
Saturday with 11 rebounds. But
that figure just. isn't impressive
for anybody's leading rebounder.
The fact remains that on the av-
erage Stewart simply doesn't al-
ways go for the boards and often
looks very tired. Still, he has an
excellent outside jump shot, and
'as Strack says, is the player who

Crisler Criticizes TV
'S tatic' n Grid Games
Special To The Daily penalties on interceptions.
PHOENIX, Ariz.-H. O. (Fritz) ,0i Allowing substitutes to enter
Crisler, Michigan athletic diector, game without reporting to de-
opined yesterday that college foot- signated official.
ball should curb television's ex- ' Reduction frm 15 to 5 yards
panding role in the production of for penalty for assisting teammate
games. move the ball forward on offense.
Speaking at the opening of thenOthecangesrwrooe se.
National Collegiate Athletic As- Other changes proposed are:
sociation rules meeting here, in- * Prohibiting player signaling
terim chairman Crisler criticized for fair catch from blocking.
television's tendency to involve it- 0 Elimination of requiring cer-
self in regulating the games tain angle of ball during center
rather than in simply telecasting snaps, so long as head and hands
them. of center not in entural zone.
Crisler presided in the absence 0 Give officials authority to
of Chairman Ivy Williamson of stop clock when game is being
Wisconsin, who is illr delayed necessarily, as during
Areas of Concern moving of sideline chains.,

are invited to meet with our
Contact your Placement Of

majoring in
" ARCHITEICTURE
ADMINISTRATION
* CHEMISTRY
" ENGINEERING
" LANDSCAPE
ARCHITECTURE
" LIBERAL ARTS
" RECREATION
" URBAN PLANNIING
representative on campus
fice for an appointment

GRADUATING SENIORS

MICHIGAN SOPHOMORE BOB SULLIVAN (20) attempts to drive around a partly hidden Illinois
defender in the Wolverines' 99-93 loss to the Illini last Saturday. Illinois' Don Flessner (30) ap-
pears ready to pounce on the Wisconsin native w ho scored eight points in Michigan's third Big Ten
defeat without a victory. Craig DiT. oversees the action at right.

finds it easiest to score.
Is forward Bob Sullivan really
a forward? At 6'4" he appears to
find it awfully hard to rebound.
He also hasn't seemed as though
he has steadied his outside shot
enough to use it regularly in the
Big Ten, although he can score
under the basket.
Unbelievable Passing,
Sullivan's passing at times is
absolutely unbelievable. This can
be taken in two ways, and often
has been. In short, he as yet
doesn't have much poise, and
poise must be learned.
Substitute .forward Dave Mc-
Clellan hasn't seen much court
time or taken many shots, but the
shots he has taken go in. In fact,
his shooting average is .667 over
the last two games. At this point,
his rebounding ability is close to
being an unknown factor, but no
one can question his effort.
Of the four main front-liners
not one has been an above aver-
age rebounder, and this is the
main reason why a team loses
with a .535 shooting percentage.
Bankey Steady
Dennis Bankey is a steady play-
er who either can't or won't shoot
from the outside. Bankey was seen
driving during the Illinois game,
and this by itself is an improve-
ment, since it means he has been
making use of his very fine speed.
Up to the Illinois game there

was a serious question as to
whether speedy guard Ken Maxey
could shoot, 'and now all that is
asked is was it an isolated per-
formance.
There can be no doubt that the
most valuable player on the Wol-
verine squad to this point has
been guard Jim Pitts. Although
lacking a real effective outside
shot, Pitts has usually been very
effective near the baseline and in
fact has only been stopped when
double-teamed, as shown by Illi-
nois, and even then he was also
cold.
Most Aggressive
Pitts is also by far the most
aggressive rebounder Michigan has,
and this is saying quite a lot for.
a backliner. But at 6'3" Pitts does
get his share even though he some-
times has to outjump players four
inches taller.
Thus far the most important
criticism that has been left out
about the offense has been ball-
handling. Right from the start of
the season there has been an im-
moderate number of turnovers. Al-
though reduced, they still happen
at the wrong time.
Aside from all the criticism of
the offense given here and else-
where, the offense is not one of a
losing team. The defense gave up
99 points to Illinois, and the of-
fense scored 93.
Trouble with Fouls
Ken Maxey one of the better
defense players has his troubles
with fouls. The trouble partly
stems from attempting to get the
man with the ball to commit of-
fensive fouls, an unusual defensive
maneuver that only a player of
Maxey's speed can pull off at all:
by trying to outposition the oppo-
sition. Unfortunately, the defen-
sive player is by definition us-
ually at a disadvantage in this

type of action, and so Maxey picks
up unwanted fouls.
Yet the big problem at Illinois
was the great number of offensive
rebounds gleaned by the Illini
during the last 13 minutes. A si-
tuation like this is so much of anj
advantage, that Michigan's shoot-
ing percentage looks inconsequen-I
tial in comparison.
But this is by no means a badj
team, and there certainly is no
reason for considering them out
of the first division yet, although
it would take an almost impossible
string to make them champions.
And Strack has said, "These boys
will be winners before they leave
the University of Michigan."
[SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Georgia 49, Kentucky 40
Georgia Tech 84, Ohio State 73
Tennessee 66, Florida 53
Vanderbilt 71, Auburn 65
North Dakota 64, State College of Iowa
58
Memphis State 46, Florida State 42
Maryland 68, Clemson 48
West Virginia 91, VMI 77
Connecticut 99, vermont 70
Creighton 85, Air Force 77
Miami (Fla) 97, Tampa 86
Western Kentucky 100, Morehead 69
So. Illinois 52, Kentucky Wesleyan 51
NBA
Baltimore 100, St. Louis 98
COLLEGE HOCKEY
Middlebury 9, Vermont 2

In addition, Cresler emphasized
two other areas of concern for col-
lege football:
1) Concern about a electronic
advancements, with emphasis on
closed circuit television and other
scouting devices.
2) Concern about the relation-
ship of professional football to
college football.
A subcommittee, headed by
Jack Curtice, head coach at Cali-
fornia at Santa Barbara, proposed
several changes in football rules.
Six of the proposals, suggested at
last week's meeting of coaches
and NCAA representatives in
Houston, Texas, are expected to
pass in a ballot vote tomorrow.
Favored Proposals
The rulesmakers will hold a
straw vote and discuss amend-
ments to the changes today. The
favored proposals included:
0 A suggestion that the tackle-
eligible play be eliminated or
modified.
* Allowing a coach to com-
municate with one player on the
sideline during a charged time
out.
Elimination of line shifts de-
signed to draw offensive players
offside.
! Eliminations of offsetting
g:. 'S" 4, v .r.. "r. v":"}4:".:4<i..i...i'}
Billboard
'a. 4 s .
Tickets to Michigan basket-
ball games are to be purchased
beginning the Wednesday before
the game at the Athletic Ticket
Office, Hoover and State Sts.
Tickets are on sale from 8:30 to
4:30 from Wednesday through
the day before the game, after
which they may be bought at
the Field House.
Tickets cost $1 and a stu-
dent must present an ID card
or Athletic Coupon for each
ticket he purchases. Only two
tickets may be purchased by
any one student.

A national registry of football
injuries, Schneider said would al-
low officials to find out if re-
latively minor injuries, not only
deaths, follow any pattern. The
meeting continues tomorrow.

i.

Michigan Doctor Speaks
- Dr. Richard C. Schneider, head
of the department of neurosurgery
at Michigan, gave a report on
neck and shoulder injuries preve-
lant in football at the meeting.
He recommended better selec-
tion of players based on their
strength and emphasized that the
players should not be allowed into
game until certified s t r o n g
enough.
Schneider also called for better
enforcement of rules now in effect
and adoption of new rules, espe-
cially one to prohibit so-called
spearing by tacklers.

~1''

JANUARY 30, 31 FEBRUARY 1,2, 3
City of Detroit-Civil Service Commission
YOU KNOW WHERE
YO'tU'RE GOI N G
(Nowwe'll tell you howtogetthere)
Go McDonnell. Because when you join
McDonnell, you'll work for aworld-renowned
name that stands for leadership and excel-
lence in the aerospace industry. You will
grow professionally by working in an envi-
ronment conducive to achievement, along-
side scientists and engineers who have
outstanding technical reputations. And
you'll build your future with a research-
oriented company that's receptive to new
ideas. You will also earn an excellent salary
and enjoy liberal fringe benefits with a com-
pany that is known for stability.
At McDonnell you also get the chance to
put your personal touch on things while
helping the team to make a contribution to
aerospace science. In addition to getting
management recognition for outstanding
accomplishments, you'll have the satisfac-
tion of knowing that you used your head to
get ahead.
The McDonnell recruiter will show you how
your degree in science or engineering can
help you get where you're going. Be sure to
chat with him when he's at your campus
placement office on January 25 and 26.
P. O. Box 516, St. Louis, Missouri 63166
An Equal Opportunity Employer

WCHA Standings

W L T Pet.
MICHIGAN 5 1 0 .833
North Dakota 8 2 0 .800
Michigan Tech 4 2 0 .667
Colorado Col. 3 2 0 .600
Denver 5 4 0 .556
Michigan State 3 5 0 .375
Minn. (Duluth) 2 7 0 .222
Minnesota 1 8 0 .111
LAST NIGHT'S RESULTS
Michigan State at Colorado
College (inc.)
TONIGHT'S GAMES
Michigan State at Denver
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL LEVIS
KEEP AHEAD
OF YOUR HAIR!!
* NO WAITING
t 7 BARBERS
* OPEN 6 DAYS
"Headquarters for Collegians"
THE DASCOLA BARBERS
Near Michigan Theatre

This Weekend in Sports
FRIDAY
Hockey-Michigan at Colorado College
Gymnastics-Western Michigan at Sports Building, 3:30 p.m.
SATURDAY
Basketball-Michigan State at Yost Fieldhouse, 1:30 p.m.
Hockey-Michigan at Colorado College
Swimming-Michian at Michigan State
Wrestling-Michigan and Ohio State at Iowa

Fifty years ago we only made 'aeroplanes.
(see what's happening now!)

Join.
The Daily
Sports Staff

AM

P'''"

New Boeing 747

r_

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STARTS TODAY!
BRIDGE LESSONS

VOICE MEETING
TONIGHT
8:00 P.M.-101 ECON BLDG.
ELECTIONS TONIGHT
for chairman and executive committee
STUDENT POWER

A

UNION-LEAGUE

RM. 3D-UNION
Price $6.00
for 7 lessons
7-9 9-11 P.M.

I

STARTING TUES., JAN. 24
DANCE LESSONS.
Popular dance.. . Rm 3R-3S---Union
$4.00 for 6 lessons
SIGN UP TODAY IN FISHBOWL 1-4 PM.

ANSWERS
to the AC Career Anagram.
on page6
.~ i
1f
. v
Ifuri hi Ktv .fud h asert

Ix
M.

USAF Minuteman II
Boeing Supersonic NASA Luniar Orbiter
Transport designj

.N .. ".

-N.

4 Boedng-Yetol HeliCOWPt

'7

-.
,'

/1l/el

Patrol Craft
Boeing 737 Twinjet

Boeing 727 Trijet

SABBATH SERVICE
Friday at 7:15 P.M.
DR. MICHAEL INBAR
Assistant Professor of Sociology

Engineers & Scientists:

NASA Saturn V

Campus Interviews, Monday and Tuesday, January 23 and 24

I

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