100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

April 12, 1966 - Image 10

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TEN

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY. APRH, 12=' 1 qag

A ETNT E MC IA AIYTT aVAIf. 9in .. aq.aSa. A t

a. a1LK7arrs..[ . nr iilit ifr, IYUh

a

Scientific Agencies Seek To Reduce
Lag Between Discovery, Reporting

'U' Offers Undergraduates
Opportunities for Research

WE'LL BUY ALL YOUR

(Continued from Page 1)
to SIE deal with the nuances of
ne wideas and novel concepts."
The scope of SIE has expanded
to cover on-going research in the
medical, biological and physical
sciences, any researcher in a rec-
ognized scientific laboratory be-
ing free to use SIE's services with-
out charge. The files, cross-in-
dexed under 10 subject heads per
report and 20-30 items of infor-

mation, contain over 100,000 rec-
ords of who is doing what, where,
when and how much, plus a 200
word summary of the technical
detail.
The SIE storehouse is growing
at a rate of more than 2000 proj-
ect reports a week and the SIE's
computers are referred to over
3000 times a week, according to
Director Dr. Monroe Freeman.
Currently over 90 per cent of
these queries come from federal-

S e Y 'r i T T 5 _ , * s s a a'T 3 S 5' 2^o 7e' 'T < .. : x a a S 3 3 _
I
AC.ross am us rt
A,

TUESDAY, APRIL 12
4 p.m.-VOICE will sponsor a
lecture by Prof. Marshall Sahlin
of the anthropology department on
"The Peace Offensive and the Ky
Regime" in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI.
8 a.m. - Registration for the
"Symposium on Remote Sensa-
tions of Environment" followed by
the opening sessions, starts in
Rackham lobby.
8:30 a.m.-Management Devel-
opment Seminars on "Basics of.
Supervision" will begin in the Un-;
lon.
1:30 p.m.-Management Devel-
opment Seminars on "On-the-Job.
Coaching and Counseling" will be-
gin in the Union.
4:00 p.m.-Prof. John Milnor of
Princeton University will speak on
"Some Algebraic Tools of Topol-
ogy," in Aud D.
4:10 p.m.-Prof. William Sears
of Florida Atlantic University will
speak on "The Interpretation of
Archaeological Data in Social and
Political Terms" in Aud B.
7 p.m.-The Brass Ensemble of
the music school will give a public
recital in the North Campus Reci-
tal Hall.
8:30 p.m. - The Professional
Theatre Program will present
"Barefoot in the Park" in Hill
Aud.
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 13
4 p.m.-Prof. John Milnor of
Princeton University will speak on
"Some Algebraic Tools in Topol-
ogy," in Aud D.
4:15 p.m. - Dr. James Neel,
chairman of the medical school
department of human genetics will
speak on "Atomic Bombs, Inbreed-
ing, and Japanese Genes," in Aud.
A.
8:30 p.m.-The Symphony Or-
chestra will give a public concert
in Hill Aud.

THURSDAY, APRIL 14
8:30 a.m.-Management Devel-
opment Seminars on "Manage-
ment Orientation" will begin in
the Union.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "A Man Escaped," in the
Architecture Aud.
FRIDAY, APRIL 15
4 p.m.-Prof. John Milnor of
Princeton University will speak
on "Some Algebraic Tools in Top-
ology," in Aud D.
8:30 p.m.-The Arts Chorale,
Prof. Maynard Klein conducting,
will give a concert in Hill Aud.
SATURDAY, APRIL 16
10 a.m.-Prof. John Milnor of
Princeton University will speak on
"Some Algebraic Tools in Topol-
ogy," in Aud D.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "Nicholas Nickleby" in the
Architecture Aud.
SUNDAY, APRIL 17
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema Guild will
present "Nicholas Nickleby" in the
Architecture Aud.

employed persons, but Freeman
hopes more universities and indus-
tries will register their projects
with SIE.
While the work of the last dec-
ade in the area of science informa-
tion flow has been largely theoret-
ical, the NSF is currently conduct-
ing several pilot projects which
have great implications for more
efficient information exchange
programs.
One was begun in 1965 in con-
junction with the Chemical Ab-
stracts Service. The CAS will at-
tempt to create a structure for
the handling of information about
organic compounds that can code
nearly one million compounds with
an identification number and reas-
sign the number to . the com-
pound each time it appears.
Computer programs are being
designed during the two-year proj-
ect that will identify the com-
pounds and make the latest in-
formation available to chemists in
automated form.
A similar study is being done
by NSF and the American Insti-
tute of Physics with the British
"Physics Abstracts." NSF is help-
ing the "Engineering Index" and
the American Society for Metals
coordinate their efforts in similar
information services.
The location of relevant, useful
data is a first step in the revo-
lutionizing of science information
flow. The easy accessibility of the
research article behind the cata-
logue card is equally important
and the solution of this problem
mayy well mean a significant
change in the current structure
of library systems.
TOMORROW: The Library in
the Future.

(Continued from Page 1)
the ability and the right kind of
temperament for research work.
In either case, the participants
are carefully selected and the very
few who display the interest and
capability necessary are offered
the opportunity to work on indi-
vidual projects conducted tutor-
ially or as assistant to a project
beginning about the eighth week
of classes.
In several cases, the researcher
may be permitted access to private
business equipment and University
facilities if these would be helpful
in his work.
Work is not restricted to stu-
dents in the department in which
the grant is available either. For
example, students in the mathe-
matics department recently work-
ed on sponsored research in the
botany department, aiding in sta-
tistical work which has become a
great part of experimental botany.
This interdisciplinary approach is
especially exciting on the under-
graduate level because it allows a
student to understand the applica-
tion of various fields of science in
the entire research picture.
Widespread Approach
This approach is not restricted
or centered on one school, but
many programs are being carried
on at the present time in prac-
tically every department. Many
departments curricula i n c l u d e
courses in research methods as a
part of the course selections and
chances for students to work more
or less independently.
Many of the projects being car-
ried out are not extensive, for very
often even humble successes at
research work will encourage the

student to go on to do more com-
plicated work in graduate school
using techniques learned now.
While it is true that many of the
jobs begin with such routine work
as washing test tubes, if a student
distinguishes himself in the proj-
ect. he may quickly work his way
up to a very responsible position.
A few theses based on such
programs have been published and
results from the studies on grants
are often bound and are made
available for reference by depart-
ment libraries.
These programs are often in-
valuable in helping a student know
whether he has the qualities which
suit him for work in academic life.
He may find after a year on a
project that he lacks the patience
or simply is not qualified for the
work.
Those who "see the light" and
find they are interested in aca-
demic pursuits become even more
enthuastic over the science. They
gain the ability to evaluate and
understand research techniques
which will provide a good back-
ground for the further work un-
dertaken.

BOOKS FOR
C ASH
(whether used on
this campus or not)
Sell them
.at

+'!
t
,.- ' .
,,-,°
f
_--,"J
cti
t ,, <, "x

l

State St. at N. University

.. . :.
.-:

I IF

-- ------

If you do you'll get right over to Ann Arbor Bank to open your
Specialcheck checking account. Why? Because it's the most eco-
nomical checking account available for you if you write just a
few checks a month. With Specialcheck account you just pay lOc
for each check you write and that's all! There's no service charge
or minimum balance required, and no charge in advance for
check-books. See Ann Arbor Bank about your Specialcheck check-
ing account.

-' -. -- **.S''- *
3 "j. A 6&l"
GOTA HEAD
FOR FIGURES?7

i,

GRADUATION' ANNOUNCEMENTS
will be distributed
TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, & THURSDAY

April 12, 1

3

14

between 10 and 3
Main Lobby, SAB

A
A13

ANN ARBOR BANK
4 CAMPUS OFFICE&
* East Uberty Street Near Maynard
* South University at East University
* Medical Center (forest at Ann)
" Plymouth Road at Huron Parkway
And 6 More Offices Serving
AN.I TARBOR /DEXTER
vt'TITMORE TLAKE;

f,
E

MEMBER FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM

I___________________________

Ii

1

Another NATIONAL BANK exclusive!

............ _

r
i

..

i

U

i

,r

I

I

Statement-Savings is a brand new way
money-made possible by National Bank's

to save
modern

computer center. This unique service is in effect now
at the new Campus Office at William and Thompson
Streets, and will be available soon at all National Bank
offices.
With Statement-Savings, you will receive a com-
puterized statement by mail every three months. This
statement will show all deposits, all withdrawals and
the interest your savings have earned during the cur-
rent year.

Statement-Savings eliminates:
* misplaced passbooks
* fear of losing passbooks while saving by mail
unnecessary bookkeeping to determine interest
* payments, withdrawals, and deposits
* waiting in line to have your passbook posted
* the need for carrying a passbook at all
So stop in soon at the new Campus Office of National
Bank and Trust Company and open a new Statement-
Savings account. You'll be earning 4% annual interest,

*1

compounded quarterly, before you know it!

#1

I I

Uk

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan