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April 08, 1966 - Image 9

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-04-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FRIDAY, APRIL 8, 1966

H~E MICHIGAN DAILY

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PAGE NINE

Weather

Threatens

Season

Opener

By JOHN SUTKUS
The immortal bard once said,
"Mother Nature careth not for
the wiles" of man: She'll run him
ragged where e'er she can."
Or, translated into the meta-
phors of a Michigan baseball fan
eagerly awaiting the debut of the
1966 Wolverines, "The third base-
man -may need snowshoes instead
' of spikes to play today."
It'slike this: there is one base-
ball game scheduled at 3:30 this
afternoon on Ferry Field between
the University of Detroit and
Michigan. Notice, that word
"scheduled."
Two of the participants in the

eternal triangle that characterizes
baseball are ready and willing to
go. The Wolverines are fresh from
one of their most successful spring
trips in history. The Titans rang
in their 1966 baseball season Tues-
day by sneaking past the Univer-
sity of Toledo 9-7 in the windy,
snowy City of Glass.
Defies Odds
But the third member in the
triumverate, Mother Nature, has
defied all the bookies (both Las
Vegas and Weather Bureau types)
by throwing spring out the win-
dow and turning April showers
into April flurries. Who knows
what May flowers will bring?

Cindermen To Meet
First. Outdoor Test

The grand old lady has strut-
ted in fine style all week, saving
some of the worst for yesterday.
And the meteorological prognosti-
cations for today are for much
of the same.
"It looks pretty bad," says Dick
Honig, assistant Michigan baseball
coach. "The field is in sad shape
and the weather is so bad that it
looks like we'll have to call it off.
We don't want to come up with
any hurt arms or legs."
The same goes for the sched-
uled doubleheader with the Mich-
igan freshmen tomorrow after-
noon. "These aren't as important
as the Detroit game," adds Honig.
The snow and cold may very
well delay the Wolverines' Ann Ar-
bor opener for a week. But .
"The final decision, won't be
made until a few hours before the
game," concludes the assistant
coach.
Up to Mother Nature
If the sky happens to fall in
today, and Mother Nature turns
out one of her more notable spring
like efforts, there could be a base-
ball game today at Ferry Field.
In that event, Detroit's Titans
will come to town showing some
flashy hitting and a powerful of-
fense. But, even in head Coach
Bob Miller's mind, the pitching
and defense will be the question
marks for this season.
Last year's Titans finished with
a 24-6 record and were rated the
best college nine in Michigan by
sometsources. The 1965 U-D squad
led the nation's major college
teams in runs scored, averaging
8.77 markers per game. A team
batting average of .311, third high-
est in the nation, helped push
across those runs.
Boppers
This year's U-Drdiamond crew
will have much the same in the

an experienced man returning at
nearly every position. Leading a
parade of five .300 hitters is sec-
ond baseman Tom Engel, who bop-
ped the horsehide at a .341 clip
last year. He was the big gun in
Tuesday's Toledo game, with a
three-for-four performance, scor-
ing two runs.
Two other veteran infielders re-
turn. Tom Siedlaczak will handle
third base and Carlos Guerra will
start at shortstop. Sophomore first

uct had two hits and knocked in Coach Miller. He starred as a
two runs against Toledo. sophomore at U-D, then signed a
Detroit's pitching staff has been contract with the Phillies. As a
severely depleted with the loss of rookie in 1950 he combined with
three front-line hurlers from the Richie Ashburn, Curt Simmons and
1965 team. Of the returnees, Bill Robin Roberts to win a pennant
Heath had the best record last for the Phillies. He had an 11-6
year with 6-1. Other veterans in- record that year. After eight sea-
clude OttenbreitandrGary Dee- sons in the majors, he retired to
han. Sophomores Fred Beaure- an insurance company position.
gard, winner at Toledo, Larry Sal- Miller rejoined baseball in 1963
ci, and Mike Surd are now to the as an assistant to U-D Coach
staff. Lloyd Brazil.
The most impressive baseball Last year he took over the
credentials of all belong to head reins upon Brazil's death.
I

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......

W<

School Time
is
OLYMPIA
TIME

UNION FLIGHTS FILLED?
CALL
UNIVERSITY CHARTER-MICHIGAN
MR. ERIC RHODEHAMEL
609 S. Fifth Ave., No. 1, Ann Arbor
Phone: 761-2348 6-8 Mon.-Fri.
EURO'PE
CALEDONIAN JET-PROP$ (
MAY 4-JUNE 16 ... DET-LON-DET
OTHER FLIGHTS AVAILABLE

By BOB MFARLAND
The bluegrass country of Ken-
tucky relied solely on the speed of
its thoroughbred horses and a
racetrack by the name of Churchill
Downs to amuse the local inhabi-
* tants until three years ago.
Variety is the spice of life
though, and the track coach at
Kentucky decided that it might be
nice to watch something a little
less flea-bitten put on contests
against the stopwatch. Thus the
inception of the Kentucky Relays,
which will provide the Wolverine
cindermen with their first crack
at the outdoors for 1966.
Shaping up as the top dual of
the meetis a battle between Al
Carius and Hylike Van Der Wal
in the 3000-meter steeplechase.
The pair turned in top times in
the event during the indoorsea-
son, .and on the basis of their ear-
lier performances, Van Der Wal
is rated the odds-on favorite, al-
though the $2 windows won't be
in action.
Recotds in Peril
The event on Saturday is ex-
pected to yield a new record, one
of the 18 which are in danger of
being eclipsed by the strongest
field ever to venture onto the
Lexington cinders.
Michigan's Jack Harvey and
George Canamare rate the best
chance of walking away with vic-
tories. They get a week's jump on
their teammates last weekend
when the duo ventured deep into
Dixie to compete in the South
Cai-olina Relays.
yHarvey.who handles the shot
like it was made of balsa wood,
grabbed a second place while Can-
amare, captain of the Wolverine
indermen, placed fourthin the
ple vault. With a performance
last week, 14" off his fine vault
of 15'8" in the NCAA indoors,
Canamare will be out to prove
76ers Hold on
To Top Celtics
By The Associated Press
The Philadelphia 76ers, after
blowing a 24-point lead, came alive
i in the closing minutes to defeat
Boston 1114105 in the National
Basketball Association's Eastern
finals last night.
The Celtics now lead 2-1 in the
best-of-7 series with the next game
Sunday in Boston.
For the better part of the first
half, with Wilt Chamberlain and
Lucious Jackson leading both the
offense and defense, the 76ers al-
most swept the Celtics off the
boards. With 5:06 left, they led by
24 and couldn't do anything
wrong.
But that's when the roof caved
in as- Boston founds its eye and
Philadelphia seemed to go blind
Before the half ended, the lead
had been chopped down to 10.
The Celtics continued to close
the gap in the second half. It
was a see-saw battle through over
half of...the. quarter, with Boston
cutting the edge to one.
It was here that Chamberlain
and Greer got hot, collecting be-
tween them the next seven Phila-
delphia 'points to put the game
out of Boston's reach.

that a hardwood runaway is not
essential for a fine performance.
Former Wolverines
Two former Wolverines now
competing for the Ann Arbor
Track Club, Ernst Soudak and
Kent Bernard, are listed as favor-
ites in the discus and 220-yard
dash, respectively. Both were par-
ticipants at the 1964 Olympics in
Tokyo.
Tennessee has entered its fresh-
man sensation, Richmond Flowers,

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DICK HONIG

baseman Ty Harvard will be the
only new face in the Titan in-
field.
Outfield prospects are bolstered
by the return of Rick Rashid and
Harry Brindsen. The third out-
field slot will likely be filled by
pitcher Mark Ottenbreit, who hit
.400 as a part-time outfielder last
year.
Catching chores will be handled
by Don Yeomans, a .316 hitter.

OPEN HOUSE on VIET NAM
Purpose-to foster discussion
on the U.S. Policy in Viet Nam
" LITERATURE *"TAPES
* DISPLAYS * REFRESHMENTS
Friday, April 8 ..* 7:00-12:00
Michigan Union-3rd Floor Conference Room
ALL ARE INVITED!
Sponsored by Voice-YSA

way of a powerful offense, with last year. The Syracuse, N.Y., prod-

JACK HARVEY

THE ONCE GROUP PRESENTS
A BENEFIT PERFORMANCE FOR A WORLD TOUR
ONCE-OFF
THEATER-MUSIC-DANCE-EVENTS
one huge program of premieres
0 ORANGE DESSERT * SOFT CENTERS
" LECTURES 0 KITT'(HAWK

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in the 120-yard high hurdles.
Flowers has developed into the
nation's best in the event, tying
the existing world record over the
shorter indoor course. He will be
pitted against Pat Pomphrey, an-
otherdVol hurdler who is highly
regarded.
Two Michigan thinclads, Woodie
Fox and Bob Thomas, will be re-'
turning to their home state for
the meet. They herald from Madi-
sonville, Kentucky. Fox will handle
the difficult assignment of con-
tending with Richmond Flowers,
while Thomas is slated to go in
the discus.
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AN NOU NCI NG
TWO (2) OPENINGS,
for
STUDENT MEMBERSHIP
on the
Board of Governors for Religious Affairs
at the University of Michigan
(This Board is composed of students, faculty,'staff and alumni
of the University of Michigan who meet monthly for a
dinner-meeting at the Union to discuss and advise on matters
pertaining to the area of religion at the University: curricular
offerings, counseling opportunities, the educational and per-
sonnel services of The Office of Religious Affairs, campus
and community religious bodies in relation to the University,
etc.)
Such an advisory board needs people interested in
this vast area; particularly does it need students
who can contribute knowledge and understanding
about student concerns, needs, hopes, ideas, etc.
LET US KNOW IF YOU ARE INTERESTED IN
APPLYING FOR MEMBERSHIP ON THIS BOARD.
To apply and/or for further information, contact:
DeWitt C. Baldwin, Director
The Office of Religious Affairs
2282 Student Activities Building
764-7442
OPEN TO ANY UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN STUDENT
(both grads and undergrads eligible)

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