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March 30, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-30

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

. PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30,1966r

PAGE SIX THE MIChIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 30,1966

B Contest Key to Backfield W ASU VICTIMS:
'IM Nine Co

ips Sixth Straight

.A- T JIL -I- 'I -IL.JLJL N-/ " Iky

(EDITOR'S NOTE: This is the sec-
and article in a four-part series
analyzing and discussing the 1966
Michigan football team.)
By HOWARD KOHN
In every football game the cen-
ter of attention is an oblong en-
tity-machine-crafted from com-
mercialized pigskin.
In every game the quarterback
uses that football to "make" the
game. He runs it, he passes it,
he hands it off; and in every way
that mobile piece of leather re-
flects the ability of the quarter-
back. The good quarterbacks, those
who combine talent with exper-
ience, can finesse with the ball
as well as any bridge player can
with cards.
The talents of a quarterback are
innate, but the finaluball-handling
sophistication develops through
practice. And that'swhere Hank
Fonde, offensive backfield coach

Volk, on the other hand, has
been as versatile as a repertory
actor. At Wauseon High (Ohio)
he called the signals for the team
and subsequently, he started out
with the freshman Wolverines as
a quarterback. By his sophomore
year, his chances of making the
grade as a starting field general
looked awfully slim in the shad-
ows of Bob Timberlake, Frosty
Evashevski and Gabler.
Rather Switch
Instead of battling the odds, he
switched to halfback and won a
starting berth. Under the Big Ten
rules in 1964, he played halfback
on both defense and offense. With
the change in rules last year,
which reinstated the platoon sys-
tem, Volk concentrated mainly on
defense.
This spring, however, he's re-
turned to the offense. "Volk de-
cided not to go out for baseball
this spring, partly because of his
knee and partly because of foot-
ball," comments Fonde. "Right
now he's working out-passing an(
handing off the ball to some 'of
the other players, but he won't
do any contact work until next
fall."
That means that the issue of a
replacement for Gabler will not be
resolved until then, but it does
not mean that Fonde can judici-
ously forget about the quarter-
backs. The position is so crucial in
the overall performance of the
team and injuries are so easily
incurred by such an important
player that Fonde mustrhave an
able substitute ready in case of
trouble.
Three for Three
Competing for the number three
spot on the list are freshmen
Dennis Brown and Jerry Hart-
man and sophomore John Thom-
as. Another candidate, frosh Bob
Kieta, has recently switched to
the defensive backfield.
Thomas is currently wearing the
gold shirt (symbolic of the runner-
up slot behind blue-shirted Vid-
mer), earned by his play in the
two intrasquad scrimmages. "We're
going to give everyone the oppor-
tunity to prove his ability on the

his knee will regain full strength."
Supporting the veteran cast -
ready to fill at the first break in
the running positions - will be
sophomore Ernie Sharpe and
freshmen George Hoey, Ron John-
son, Ted Jobe and. John Reynolds.
Another of last season's impromp-
tu offensive runners, John Row-
ser, has also departed for the de-
fense.
Now the Wolverines.. .
Sharpe is the only back with
Big Ten experience-capsuled in
his 4.1 average in 18 carries as a
right halfback.
Among the frosh, Hoey is the
speedster while the other three
are mainly power runners. Hoey,
a graduate of Flint Central, is the
fastest man on the spring roster
and rivals trackster Ward for team
speed honors. The 170-pounder.
who has added 15 pounds to his
prep playing weight, tied Ward in
the 60-yard dash during the in-
door track season.
Johnson, at 190 pounds, and
Jobe, at 183, team up with Hoey
as second-string halfbacks, while
the 230-pound Reynolds is a sub
fullback.
As each one goes through the
spring drills, smashing and twist-
ing into the lines, they grip that
pigskin with the inborn realiza-
tion that the center of attention
will be on whoever's carrying it
next fall in the season games.
Tomorrow: The Defensivej

Special To The Daily
PHOENIX, Ariz. -Michigan's
baseball team blistered past two
more foes on their spring tour
by whipping Western Colorado 7-0
and knocking over Arizona State
8-5 yesterday.
The Wolverines now have a win-,
ning skein of six victories against
no defeats on the season.
Michigan shutout Western Colo-
rado in the morning before tak-
ing on last year's national champs
in the afternoon. Arizona State
rated second in the pre-season
poll, had a 15-3 record before the
fifth-ranked Wolverines invaded
the cactus countiy last week. In
three wins by the Wolverines over
the Sun Devils since then, Michi-
gan has posted 23 runs to Ari-
zona State's 12.
Whitewashing
In the first gane, Michigan was
led by sophomore Bill Scott's two-
hitter and the bat of Mel Waka-
bayashi. Scott went all the way
in the seven-inning game, striking
out seven and walking four. "Wa-
ka" had a perfect day at the
plate with three singles and a
walk.
Three runs came across for the
Wolverines in the first inning on
singles by Wakabayashi, Rick Sy-
gar and Al Bara, plus two walks
and a fielder's choice. The third
run came in on a double steal by

Two singles in the second and
a walk to Sygar, followed by an
error pushed across two more runs
Two more runs were added in the
fourth on a single by "Waka,"
walks to Bara and Fisher, and a
two-run single by Nelson.
Nelson led the team in runs-
batted-in by driving across three
runs in a single and a walk. "Wa-
ka" batted in two runs and added
a stolen base to his credit.
In the second game, the Wol-
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Minnesota 2, Los Angeles 0 (5 inn,
rain)
Washington 6, Kansas City 4
Pittsburgh 6, Chicago (A) 5
Chicago (N) 12, Cleveland 10
San Francisco 2. California 1
Atlanta vs. Philadelphia, canceled,
rain
Cincinnati vs. St. Louis, canceled, wet
. grounds
Houston vs. Boston, canceled, rain
New York (A) vs. New York (N), can-
celed, wet grounds
Baltimore vs. Detroit, canceled, rain
NHL
Chicago 4, Boston 2l

verines were led by Bill Zeph's
stingy pitching and Bob Gilhool-
ey's timely batting Punch. Before
leaving in the eighth frame. Zepb
only allowed one earned run and
three unearned runs. Gilhooley
Michigan shortstop, punched out
.three hits in four at-bats to drive
in two runs.
Eighth Inning Eclipse
Michigan wrapped up the game
in the top of the eighth by scor-
ing five runs on three hits, a walk
a passed ball and two errors. Loser'
Dave Spier, who was knocked off
the mound by the uprising, drop-
ped his record to 4-2. Zeph picked
up the win in his first start of
the year.
Each side cracked a home run
in the second inning. Les Tanona's
blast hit the top of the leftfield
fence and bounced out of the
park. Arizona State's Reggie Jack-
son knocked out an inside-the-
park homer for his sixth round-
tripper of the season.
Today tho Wolverines play
a tripleheader, meeting first Ari-
zona State in a twinbill and then
Wyoming in a single game.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
HOWARD KOHN

DICK VIDMER

RICK VOLK

at Michigan, comes in. His job is to
get the Wolverines' quarterbacks
ready for next season.
Vidmer vs. Yolk
Five or six players have a
mathematical chance to win the
field general position. Dick Vid-
mer and Rick Volk head the list.
"They both have the capabilities
to do the job," says Fonde.
At the moment, however, only
Vidmer has been scrimmaging with
the team, while Volk is limiting his
actions to calisthenics and of-
fensive drills-minus the defense.
A winter knee operation is the
reason for Volk's lack of partici-
pation.
oVidmer,last 'fall's understudy
to graduating Wally Gabler, may
appear to be heir apparent to
Gabler's duties, but the case is
not yet closed.The spirit of com-
petition is part of Fonde's job
too.

t
T
3
i
l

If Anyone Cares .. .
For the benefit of sports fans
who cherish all athletics with-
out restrictions as to caliber
quality and integrity, the Mich-
igan Daily sports staff would
like to report that Muhammed
Ali won a unanimous decision
from George Chuvalo in their
"heavyweight championship"
bout in Toronto last night.

ry, is on the outdoor track team;
and Jim Detwiler, who sat out
most of the 1965 season with an
injured knee, is taking no chances
on reinjuring the knee this spring
and is only doing exercises in a
sweat suit.
- Dave Fisher, the bruising full-
back who finished second to Ward
in rushing, is still bulling through
the lines in the spring practices
"with no effects of a winter vaca-
tion." All three-Ward, Detwiler
and Fisher-will be seniors next
year.
Rick Sygar, last season's substi-
tute for Detwiler and the team's
second leading point scorer, is
currently out in Arizona with the
baseball team. "He'll be in the de-
fensive backfield in the fall," says
Fonde. "We're counting on Det-
viler to be ready to go on of-
fense. Thebdoctors are hopeful that
There's no limit to the good a
man can accomplish through
reliance on God. But it takes I
humility and a deep spiritual
commitment. You learn to de-
pend on the divine Love that
makes possible every worth-
while act. You're invited to hear
this subject explored further at
a one-hour public lecture by
William Henry Alton of The
Christian Science Board of
Lectureship. The lecture title is
"Man Unlimited." Everyone is
welcome to come and listen.
Christian science lecture
8:00-Friday, April 1
Aud. A, Angell Hall
William H. Alton, C.S.B.
Sponsored by the
Christian Science Organization

I

Line. Doug Nelson and Les Tanona.
.:t
Yes {
t
to Alm' Arbor.
Feel like s p ri
JjIv jj youtbrow.se
iaiChet
601 and 607 E. Liberty St, }
O 677
6Ann Arbor
I,________ __ _____ ___36

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE
TO ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
exciting, challenging, and self rewarding. For many years you
have been preparing for this major step that leads from College
to Career. NOW THE TIME HAS COME TO CONCENTRATE AND
ACT; TO FIND THE JOB YOU WANT. With competition for career-
launching jobs increasing at a rapid pace, A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED RESUME IS ESSENTIAL IN OPENING THE BEST DOORS!
Your resume, when written by a Professional Writer, will pinpoint
Your Assets, and present them in a clear positive way. It will save
you Valuable time in contacting the career opportunities You want.
At the RESUME BUREAU your resume is written by professional
writers, with specialized knowledge of personnel practices, and
wide experience in the Business and Technical worlds.
TIME TO START YOUR CAREER CAMPAIGN!! 1l Learn how we
can help you to Sell Yourself, and find the job you've worked so
hard to prepare for!
WRITE TODAY
RESUME BUREAU, 47 Kearney St., San Francisco, Cal.

Attend the
Emergency
Conference
on CHINA
Sun., Apr. 3
Hill Aud., Diag
Angel--Mason
A
7
2 PM. to 6:30 P.M.
(China Today)
ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN
Leading Expert on
Chinese Economy
FELlX GREENE
Author, roduce of
ilm"CIA
MORTON FREID
Noted Anthropologist of
Chinese Peasantry

8 P.M. to 1:30 A.M.
(China & the U.S.)
OWEN LATTIMORE
China Scholar, Former
U.S. Policy Advisor
U.S. STATE DEP'T.
REPRESENTATIVES
Addresses, Seminars, Panel,
Films, Literature
and numerous
other China
experts

4

4

11

Ji
d
S.
i;
e

Second Chance for Both r
"Vidmer knows the ropes be-t
cause he's been a quarterback all
through high school and college.I
He picked up a lot of experience
last year and he's improved tech-j
nically this spring," explains
Fonde. "But wesdefinitely want to
give Volk a chance next fall."
Both are lettermen. Vidmer Is
the sophomore and Volk the jun-
ior. Both contested Gabler for
quarterback last fall, but Vidmer
was relegated to back-up man and
Volk was switched to the defen-
sive backfield for the season.
Owing to his flashy passing:
Vidmer had originally won the
starting position at quarterback
but inconsistent performances on
the field cost him his number one
ranking.____
1

job. I've been impressed with the
desire and ambition that they've,
shown thus far, and the position
is still very much open," Fondle
explains.
Fonde has been given a little
more time to work with his quar-
terbacks this spring, since the oth-
er three backfield starters will be
returning next fall. Two of these
in fact, are not even scrimmaging
with the team.
Left halfback Carl Ward, who
led the Wolverines in total rush-
ing yardage and in yards per car-

yI

TECH IRAMA
APRIL 2 & 3

N

The Collar's
The
Tip-Off
First thing you notice about a
shirt is the collar. Is it immaculately
clean? Smoothly, evenly pressed?
Or does it look a little bit tired,
not quite up to seeing the day
through?
When the collar looks superb,
it's a pretty good sign the whole
shirt is expertly done. You know
it's been handled by highly trained
laundresses working skillfully at the
best of scientific equipment. The
kind we have at Kyer. Call us to-
day.

DO YOU HAVE
WHAT IT
TAKES TO BE
A LEADER?*

*If you do, don't settle for less.

1'

4
4.

If you will complete your first two years of college this spring
and have not had ROTC training, you now have a special
opportunity to earn an Army officer's commission in the next
two years. You can qualify to fulfill your military obligation as
an officer while you study for a college degree in a field of
your choice.
Through a new two-year Army ROTC program you will
receive leadership training and experience that will be valu-
able assets for the rest of your life, in either a military or a

may request postponement of your military service while you.
complete your studies for a graduate degree.
Most large business and industrial firms prefer the college
graduate who has been trained and commissioned as an
officer-who has the ability to organize, motivate and lead
others-and who has had experience in accepting responsi-
bilities beyond his years.
You owe it to yourself to investigate this important op-
portunity.

I

I1/)

I

I

Cnr nmmr% Infn infnrrnnfinn nn fho now fwn.VPar Army ROTC

i

v

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