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March 27, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-27

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

FAGS SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 27,1986

PAGE SIX THE 1~HCHIGAN DAILY SUNDAY. MARCH 27. 1ftE~

r .r... w...aaars+u e r .avvv

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Attend The
Emergency
Conference
On
C
N
A
SUNDAY, APRIL 3
2 P.M.-2 A.M.
DIAG, HILL AUD,
ANGELL-MASON HALLS
Featuring
OWEN LATTIMORE

By HOWARD KOHN
For every rule there is an
exception.
And in the face of the contem-
porary philosopher's view that the
little boy who wants to be a cowboy
will never get farther west than
the Mississippi, George Mans has
tossed one empirical case to the
contrary.
Mans had always wanted to be
a football player and a football
coach. As a kid his whole world
was made up of footballs, back-
yard scrimmages, footballs, school-
yard scrimmages and more foot-
balls.
Offensive End
He was big and rangy, with a
quickness that belied his burly
frame, and as a player he became
better than good. He won varsity
gridiron letters three times in high
school and three times in college=-
a perfect record.
But instead of turning profes-
sional, he decided to accept an
offer with General Motors. For a
while, it looked like the philoso-
pher was right and that football
had only been a boyhood craze
which had ended upon graduation.
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Then, sitting in his office two
years ago, George Mans made a
decision. Michigan Tech, lord of
the ice rink but patsy of the grid-
iron, had just given him a chance
to become backfield coach.
First Love
Minutes later he was cleaning
out his desk. "There was no use in
kidding myself," explains Mans.
"When I'd first joined General
Motors, I wasn't exactly sure of
what I wanted to do. But there
soon was no doubt. Instead of
writing out production lists, I'd
be doodling around setting up
football formations. It was back
to football for me."
After one year up at Houghton,
he signed on as defensive line
coach at Eastern Michigan. And
then, a month ago, he rejoined his
alma mater here in Ann Arbor as
assistant offensive line coach.
"I'm extremely pleased to have
him back as a coach," enthuses
head coach Bump Elliott, who had
Mans as a player in 1959-60-61
and who recommended him for the
position. "He has an outstanding
desire to know the game and to
pass on that knowledge to the
players."
Contentment
And with no formal induction
other than inking his contract,
Mans became one of those men
who make dreams real. He's back
doing what he wants to do.
"When I get up in the morning
now, I look forward to going down
to the office. I don't regard my
job as 'work.' I enjoy it and I'd
like to remain a coach for the rest
of my life," says Mans in simple
terms of dedication.
"There is always something dif-
ferent and exciting to look for-
ward to in football. Each game is
a different game, each offense,

each defense and even each play
is different. . . . And, as a coach,
you're dealing with personalities-
with players and fans. Every time
you meet a new recruit or every
time you meet someone who saw
your game a week ago or a year
ago, it's a new experience. There
is nothing stereotyped about foot-
ball."
Trenton High
Mans' affiliation with football
began in Trenton, Mich., where he
was born and where he earned
all-league and all-state honors as
a prep gridder.
"My neighborhood was just like
those Canadian towns which em-
phasize nothing but skating. . .
Only in Trenton it was football.
It was the thing to do ... every-
one played football. Gary Lowe
(who later made it big in the pros
with the Lions) was in high school
there when I was just a kid, and
everyone looked up to him," re-
members Mans. Then, with a small
chuckle, he adds, "Of course, Lowe
went to Michigan State."
Mans, however, who helped
Trenton to a composite 17-1 rec-

because of1
school."

the coaches and theI

Homecoming
Current coaches Jocko Nelson
and Hank Fonde, along with El-
liott, were also handling Wolverine
football when Mans enrolled at
Michigan.
"I can remember George as al-
ways being an outstanding leader.
He never gave anything but his
best out there," recalls Elliott.
Mans played tight end for the
Wolverines for three years-with-
out setting any records or without
even playing on a championship
team. But these facts are mislead-
ing to his real value as a player.
Michigan, led by Bennie McRae
and Dave Raimey, was a rushing
team which paid little attention
to an air attack in the early sixties,
The Wolverines didn't even have
a split end during Mans' stay at
Michigan.
Heartbreaker
But, as captain in his senior
year, he was instrumental in send-
ing Michigan into a showdown
battle for a Rose Bowl berth with
Minnesota on the final day of the
ED:*

GEORGE MANS

ord in his junior and senior year,
came to Michigan-as a tough of-
fensive end. "Forest Evashevski
had wanted me to come out tol
Iowa, but I stayed with Michigan

Gridiron -the Living Jind'for Mans

season. The Wolverines lost 23-20
on a last-minute fumble in the
backfield, and Mans had to settle
for" a spot in the North-South All-
Star game instead of the trip to
Pasadena.
He had a BA degree in Business
Ad and so Mans took a position
in the automotive field after grad-
uation. But his love of the sport
prevailed.
"It's great to be back at Mich-
igan. I sincerely believe that there
is no better group of coaches to
work with and to learn from,"
explains Mans.
Mans is handling the offensive
ends, thus spelling Tony Mason
from that chore and giving rotund
Tony more time with the interior
offensive line. And according to
Mason, "George is a real student
of the game. You can't say that
this is his first year here and that
he's just learning, because in that
sense we're all still learning. He
played at end and he knows what
playing the position means."
Number One Theme
On the field and off the field,
Mans' interests reflect his involve-
ment with football. He hasn't mar-
ried yet, and even his hobbies in-
clude attending football clinics.
"I like the outdoors, and I play
golf and hunt, but I'd rather see a
football game or be working with
the team. And that leaves little
time for anything else,' Mans ex-
plains.
How long is he going to remain
a bachelor? "Well, Tony Mason
didn't get married until last year
and he's 35, so I think I've got a
few more years to go," says Mans
with a smile.
And Mason joins in with, "Even
now, I sometimes get so caught up
with my work that I forget that
I'm married."
Whereupon both Mans and Ma-
son put on their coats and went
out the door "to have dinner with
a high school football coach in

A

9

YESTERDAY'S TWINBILL CANCELL

'M' Nine Powers by AS U, 9-6

China
U.S.

Scholar, Former
Policy Advisor

ALEXANDER ECKSTEIN
Leading Expert on
Chinese Economy
FELIX GREENE
Author, Producer of
Film "CHINA"
MORTON FREID
Noted Anthropologist of
Chinese Peasantry
U.S STATE DEP'T.
REPRESENTATIVES/
Addresses, Seminars, Panel,
Films, Literature

How to spend a weekend
in Chicago for $16

JUDY CHAPMAN
Western College
Oxford, Ohio
says, "Any
student, man
or woman, can
stay at
Chicago's
YMCA Hotel
and enjoy a
weekend for
$16.00. Here is
how I did it.

special To The Daily
SCOTTSDALE, Ariz.-Arizona's
warm, dry climate is supposed to
be good for sinus sufferers, but it
also must help the muscles. The
Michigan baseball team proved it
by powering out a 9-6 victory over
Arizona State University last Fri-
day night in Phoenix.
The Wolverines used a total of
13 hits and two Arizona State
miscues to provide their nine-run
total. It was the Wolverines first
game of the year -and Arizona
State's nineteenth. The Sun Devils
are 15-4.
Yesterday's scheduled double-
header between these same two
teams was rained out and one
game has been rescheduled as a
night game for Wednesday, March
30. It will be the third game of a
tripleheader for the Michigan club.
In the afternoon Michigan will
play the University of Wyoming
and Arizona State.
Surprise for Sun Devils
'Playing in Phoenix Municipal
Park, spring home of San Fran-
cisco Giants, Michigan wasted no
time Friday night as they came
up with seven runs in the first
inning to show off some of their
power which had been bottled up
in Yost Fieldhouse. The seven-run
outburst was highlighted by first
baseman Chan Simonds' two-run
inside-the-park homer as the Wol-
verines sent 11 men to the plate
in the "hello" frame.
Michigan picked up another run
on a solo shot by third baseman
Keith Spicer in the fourth, and
Simonds chased home the last run
BIG BROTHER
IS WATCHING YOU
A mobile that is time-
ly, tantalizing, topical.
Hang it in your den,
office, living room.
$2.00 postpaid
T. Beaubien Healy
234 Tenth St.
Toledo 2, Ohio

in the sixth with a double. a
Bob Reed, Michigan's starting
and winning pitcher, went the
first six innings and allowed the
Sun Devils three runs. Nick Rad-
akovic relieved in the seventh,
holding Arizona State scoreless in
that frame, but ran into trouble in
the eighth when last year's na-
tional champions loaded the bases
with only one out.
Stingy Substitute
Michigan coach Moby Benedict
went to junior letterman Jim
Lyijynen who closed the door on
the Sun Devils, retiring the last
five men without allowing a ball
out of the infield to save the win.
Arizona State starter Fritz
Glick absorbed the loss, faling to
survive the Wolverines' seven-hit
barrage in the first inning.
Michigan's captain Bob Gil-
hooley was also an offensive
standout, getting on base five
times on three walks and two hits.
Every Wolverine starter, except
second baseman Rick Sygar, col-
lected at least one hit. Sygar, how-
-ever, brought the crowd to its feet
with a 400-hundred-foot poke
SCORES
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Chicago (A) 1, New York (N) 0
Detroit 3, New York (A) 2
Houston 5, Kansas City 4
Washington 3, St. Louis 1
Philadelphia 5, Cincinnati 0
Chicago (N) 3, California 0
San Francisco vs. Cleveland,
cancelled, rain
Minnesota 3, Boston 1
Los Angeles 3, Atlanta 1
Baltimore 7, Pittsburgh 2
NHL
Montreal 5, Boston 2
Toronto 3, Detroit 1
NBA PLAYOFFS
Eastern Division Semifinal
Boston 132, Cincinnati 125 (best-of-
five series tied 1-1)

which was hauled down in deep
left center. Phoenix Municipal
Stadium, with its over-sized out-
field made especially for the mus-
cular Giants, measures 410 feet in
left center.
The Wolverines take on Wyom-
ing in a single ,game today in
Tempe.
Line score:
MICHIGAN 7 0 0.1 0 1 0 0 0 9 13 3
Arizona St. 0 1 0 0 2 0 2 1 0 6 10 2
Reed, Radakovic (7), Lyi3 ynen (8),
and Sizemore. Glick, Cheat (1), Galla-
gher (3), Culligan (8), Robison (9), and
Dyer.

Gridders Seek Shelter,
Battle on 30-Yard Field

/ JvLavl I Lo.

I

I

'
,

Fri. P.M. Dinner at YMCA Hotel $1.25
Chicago Symphony 2.50
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
Sat. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Art Institute Tour Free
Lunch at Stouffer's 1.45
Sat. P.M. Nat. Hist. Museum Tour Free
Dinner at Y Hotel 1.25
Sat. nite dance, Y Hotel .15
Cokedate .45
Room at Y Hotel 2.95
Sun. A.M. Breakfast at Y Hotel .58
Worship at Central Church
Lunch at Y Hotel 1.30

By STEVE FICK
Ernie Sharpe faked to his left at
the 10-yard line, cut right quickly
and moved between two would-be
tacklers at the 15,. broke into the
clear at the 20-and then stopped.
Not that he particularly wanted
to. It's just'that when you're play-
ing on a 30-yard long gridiron
that's been chalked.off inside Yost
Field House, you have to give up
some of the pleasures of life .. '
like the 90-yard run.
Sharpe and Bump Elliott's other
90 or so charges had moved in-
doors for yesterday afternoon's in-
trasquad scrimmage, the second
of the year. Cold weather combin-
ed with a light snowfall had made'
Ferry Field, the scheduled site of
the workout,. just a little bit too
slippery to play on.

jntzen rules the underworld

Sun. P.M. Back to campus

Total $15.41,

Double Disadvantages
Elliott, installing only eight

MEN WOMEN * FAMILIES
Stay at Chicago's
YMCA HOTEL
826 South Wabash
at the edge of the Loop
accommodationstor 2,000 e rats $2.95emd up
Write for reservations or call 922-3183

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Keyed-up students:
unwind at Sheraton
during spring
and summer:}:
vacation
and save money... *
This FREE ID Card entitles you to
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Sheratons. (Teachers can enjoy the
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nine men at a time on defense
(the offense, meanwhile, would
run its entire series of plays to
either the left or the right), work-
ed the first and second string
players for about an hour and a
half, then sent them to the show-
ers while the rest of the squad
went at it for another hour.
The blue-shirted side, composed
of most of the returning offensive
lettermen along with some less
experienced returnees and a pas-
sel of freshmen, seemed to get the
best of the white-shirts, who
boasted many of the Wolverines'
returning defensive players with
a few freshmen thrown in too.
Quarterbacking for the Blues
was split between Dick Vidmer and
freshman Dennis Brown, with Vid-
mer at the helm while the more
experienced Blue players were in
the game.
Vidmer's unit, which included
Clayt Wilhite and Jack Clancy at
the ends, Stan Broadnax and
freshman Dave Denzin at tackle,
Henry Hanna and Don Bailey at
guar4 and Joe Dayton at center,
was the most effective of the four
that played for the first hour and
a half.
Vidmer mixed up - the .- middle
plays by fullback Dave Fisher with
pitchout patterns to right halfback
Sharpe and left halfback Ron
Johnson, u freshman.
Elliott also had praise for' Dave
Denzin. "Dave has come along well
at tackle, learning quickly. Of
course, he still needs to learn a
lot, but there's. plenty of time
ahead for that... ."
Yes, there's plenty of time
ahead. Time for more scrimmages,
hopefully outdoors. Time for more
of the thousands and thousands
of individual comments and tips
from coaches to athletes that are
needed' to make a Big Ten team
out of a fieldhouseful of football
players.
Time, eventually, for "Ernie
Sharpe to finish his 90-yard
run...

.
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Two programs of contemporary music

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RECORDING CONCERTS

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PAULINE OLIVEROS and DAVID TUDOR
guest artists

HOMECOMING 1966 CENTRAL COMMITTEE
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Tuesday, March 29-8:30 P.M.
ONCE ENSEMBLE with DAVID TUDOR

Floats & Displays
SHARI SEIDMAN
TOM GAFFNEY
Booklet
CHRIS MEYERS

Entertainment
BONNIE YUJUICO
CHUCK FEUER
Alumni Relations
JUDY ALTMAN

Graphics
SUE MAHR
JIM McDOWELL
Tickets
PATTIE GIBBS

I ST. ANDREWS EPISCOPAL CHURCH

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