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March 27, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-27

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SVNDAY,.MARCH 21.1966

-in- I -." -

,

rofessor Angell Emf
0p
ew Stress on Social

By DIANE LYNN SALTZ

Integration has been the key-
note of the academic career of
Prof. Robert C. Angell of the so-
ciology department.
Academically, he first became
interested in social integration-
what holds groups together-while
a graduate student at the U~niver-
sity. His doctoral thesis, published'
in book form as "The Campus,"
delved into the experience of un-
dergraduate life as a whole.
During the depression, Angell
was able to test his ideas on in-
tegration by studying families
pressured by income loss. Later
his scope broadened further-first
to the American society of a whole
and later to the international
scene.-
Best Known for American Studies
I've taught mostly in the area
of American institutions," Angell
observed. "This course (soc. 422)
has been the heart of my career,
the one students know me for."
Angell's Sociology 452 course,
national cultures and world so-
cieties reflects the expansion of
his interests in social integration
to international areas.
A n g e 11 transferred , research
methods he had employed in
American studies to his later in-
ternational studies.
"Before World War II, I de-
cided to find ways of getting hold
of the idea of integration with
empirical research. After olbtain-
ing comparative data on more
than 40 American cities, I drew
a few basic conclusions about what
makes a city desirable to live in.
Studied Integration
"The'rate of in and out migra-
tion, causing a lack of stability,
is one of the most influential fac-
tors in keeping integration down.
Heterogeneity-the percentage of
minority groups in the population
--also plays an important role."
The war interrupted Angeli's
study, but it also led him to con-
sider the great international prob-
lem-ending war.
Approaching the situation in a
manner similar to his study on
American cities, Angell used what
he calls "transitional participa-
tion" in his international studies.
"It encompasses," he says, "stu-

Prof. Rober
dents studying abroad, technical
assistants, and business and mili-
tary personnel who actually live
abroad. These are not tourists but
are residents who participate in
any one of 1700 international, re-
ligious, recreational, professional,
or political organizations.
Studied International Problems
Angell feels his study concen-
trates on a positive factor in in-
ternational integration.
"In 1956 we (Prof. Kenneth
Boulding of the economics de-
partment and a few others) felt
that social sciences other than
political science-sociology, eco-
nomics, psychology, anthropology
--should also do something about
the world situation." As a result,
the Center of Research on Con-
flict Resolution was founded, and
Angell became its co-director from
1961 to 1965 along with Prof.
Boulding, the current director.
In addition to his academic ac-
tivities, Angell has been an integral
part of the University structure.
"I think I've served on practically.
all kinds of committees," the pro-
fessor remarked. You might say
I'm an 'academic citizen'."
Active in Sesquicentennial
Presently Angell is chairman of
of the ; sesquicentennial subcom-
mittee responsible for the "Voices

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ORGANIZATION NOTICES ..
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hasizes THEATRE Present Economic Prosperity
Sciences Chicago Group Utilizes Challenged by Serious Inflation
C ham ber M usic V ar ety By University News Service But there is another view which are far less dangerous to our
MIAMI BEACH, Fla.-The next considers the unemployment in- economy than general deflation.
By LINNEA HENDRICKSON ist facililey moved between the six to 12 months will reveal dex as a more sensitive measure In a dynamic economy such as
abruptly high and low pitches de- whether we can continue our un- of the nation's economic health, ours stable prices seldom mean
A smallnbut apeciate ay manded by the piece. precedented prosperity-probably he pointed out, unchanging prices. Prices had ac-
ence listened to the ContemporaryInes rcdne prseiypoal "tulybn cesnmrelwy
Chamber Players of the University Intense the longest sustained economic ad- "An unemployment rate of 3.7 tually been Increasing more slowly
of Chicago perform in the Union William Sydeman's "Concerto vance in American history-with- per cent of the labor force is, in in recent years than in previous
B. Ciaglo perio int. h Union da Camera," written in 1958, con- out serious inflation, Dean William this view, still too high and our post-war business cycle booms."
pey, one of a st ng. ah a cluded the first half of the con- Haber of the literary college said policies should aim at a jobless Prices have remained virtually
American composers started the cert. In this piece, one could yesterday, rate of about 2.5 per cent. The unchanged between 1956 and 1964.
group dedicated to playing the clearly hear the intenseness and "Upon the success of this cru- 4.0 per cent objective was an The wholesale price index rose by
chamber music works of moder fragmentation which characterized cial undertaking will depend not 'interim' goal and clearly not the 2 per cent in 1965, and prices may
composers at the University of the music of the concert only the continuance of the high- ideal measure of full employment. increase in 1966 by 21/ or 3 per
Chicago in 1964. "Trio for flute, piano, and Page est levels of employment in over "Consequently, we should avoid cent or even by 3/2 per cent.
Turner," by Pauline Oliveros, a decade, but also our ability to a heavy foot on the economic ac- "This shift to a higher rate, of
Van Tassel, spokesman and which opened the second half of deal constructively with a host of celerator, one which might create course, should be a warning, one
manager for the group said there the concert was the noticeably problems demanding national at- a general deflation and another which needs to be heeded.: Even
is definitely a trend to chamber most unusual number performed. tention. Basic economic goals and recession." so, inflation in myview is a rather
to their The page turner was important, values are involved," Haber said. Haber suggested we continue to hysterical term to characterize the
music. "Composers want for he pressed down certain keys Haber also cautioned against "a emphasize manpower training and price changes since 1955 or even
works to be performed, therefore on the piano to catch the over- heavy foot on the economic ac- mobility to meet occupational and in 1965 or 1966," Haber argued.
they don't write symphonies." tones. Flutist Pierswell occasional celerator," and said drastic mone- geographical labor shortages, and We should, he said, avoid "re-
Many of these new works experi- ly leaned over and plucked a string tary measures which affect the resist a hasty clamping down on acting too fast." "Overreacting
ment with new forms and combi- of the piano. In certain instances entire economy should be avoided. production. now may create the very recession
the pitch on long notes intention- Tax Increase Justified Unemployment Damage we seek to avoid. We are 'manag
C. Angell nations of instruments. Van Tassel ally wavered up and down. He believes the case for a tax "To do that at this stage would ing' a delicate mechanism. Gov
said they have tried to create an increase of six to eight billion mainly serve to perpetuate the eminent action on taxation and
of Civilization" program, which d Vitality dollars by midyear is justified, and problem of unemployment for too fiscal matters or by the Federa
will bring some 25 great citizens ne The concert was concluded by pointed out that the maintenance many people. In my view the harm Reserve Board influences decisions
of the world here in October, 1967. in Chicago have succeeded. Shapey's own "Concerto for Clar- of prosperity and the growing and damage done by moderate of millions of consumers and
Angell's educational methodol- Expressionistic Inet and Chamber Group," a piece economy is especially essential in price increases is far less serious hundreds of thousands of busi-
ogy is "to be strict and enforce The concert opened with an ex- full of vitality and drum rolls, these "revolutionary times. than that created by unemploy- nessmen."
hard-boiled regulations, while at pressionistic work by Alban Berg, which featured clarinet soloist "There are many in our land ment. To stop the inflation trend, Stressing that the aim is the
he same time being human and "Three Pieces for Clarinet and Milosovich. who are of the view that price if that is what is taking place, is maintenance of long-term eco-
riendly. "I mark late papers Piano." This work was written be- The players showed extraordi- stability is more significant to to halt the present trend toward nomic growth and to avoid a "run
lown, but am always wiling to fore Berg experimented with the nary skill in surmounting I the our national health and well- high level and full employment," away" inflation or a recession,
em. 12 tone scale. Following was "Can- technical difficulties and the being than full employment," he he said. Haber said we must discourage a
ems." . .tata No. 3, Leda and the Swan," problems of interpretation of the said. "According to this view we Pointing out that prices have "fr e n z i e d and self-defeating
"I believe in keeping active in by Peter Westergaard, based on music, which must be credited to are already encountering serious been rising quite regularly since scramble for limited resources,"
the classroom. It makes students the poem of the same name by their ability as musicians and to manpower shortages, and other 1933, Haber said "we have had and "must avoid drastic monetary.
feel youre dealing with a dynamic Yeats. Neva Pilgrim, soprano solo- the leadership of Ralph Shapey. bottlenecks in the economy will 'creeping' inflation for a long time. measures which affect the entire
subject. soon develop." Such slow upward moving prices economy."
Angell comes from a University-
oriented family. His uncle was PH. 483-4680
Prof. Charles Cooley, the great
American sociologist. One of his
grandfathers was James B. An-
gell, former University president DIAL 8-6416
and another served as dean of the _________O PENTER RA
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Ar

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN.
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
* * *
U. of M: Student Religious Liberals,
Sun., March 27, Peace CorpsRound
Table. Short talk & discussion by for-
mer volunteers in Pakistan, Brazil, Tur-
key, and Tanganyika. 7 p.m., Unitar-
ian Church. Rides 6:45 p.m. from Mark-
ley & side entrance to Mich. Union.
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermediate
folk dancing, every Mon., 8:30-l0:3C
p.m., Women's Athletic Bldg.
Americans for Reappraisal of Far
Eastern Policy will meet for discussion
on Japan, Sun., March 27, 4 p.m., Room
3C, Michigan Union.
* * *
Gamma Delta, Lutheran student orga.
nization, 1511 Washtenaw, March 27, e
p.m., supper. 7 p.m., Concordia Chapel
Players present a dramatic trilogy, "Sac-
rament & Sacrifice," by Robert Clau-
sen; "The Least of These," by Virginia
Elicker, "The Lord's Prayer," Motion
Choir. Interested persons cordially in-

0

vited.

* * *

University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sun. morning services 9:4
& 11:15, "A Guarantee for Life," Rev
T. Scheidt, speaker. Communion to be
celebrated, Bible class at 11:15. All wel-
come.
* * *
Lutheran Student Center, Showing of
award winning film, "Question 7," Sun.
March 27, 7 p.m., Hill St. at S. Forest
Ave.
La Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia
lunes, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Ven-
gan todos.
Newman Student Association, Pre-
Marriage Instructions, "Psychological
Adjustments in Marriage," March 27, E
p.m., 331 Thompson, speaker: Tim Ry-
an. Mon., March 28, interdisciplinary
graduate symposium, Theme II, "Prac-
tical Problems in Medical Ethics," 74
p.m., 331 Thompson.
* * *
Guild House, Mon. noon luncheor
discussion: "Concerning China and the
World," March 28, 12-1 p.m., Guild
House, 802 Monroe.

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