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March 26, 1966 - Image 3

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-26

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SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE RE

SATURDAY, MARCH 26, 1966 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAE~ TTf1U~'1E

a C)U f.:r 1 R11 C.P

it

Suharto Fails
To Complete
New Cabinet
Jakarta Government
Shaky; Students Call
For Non-Communists
JAKARTA, Indonesia (')-In-
donesia's new .regime failed again
yesterday to reach agreement on
a new Cabinet, indicating that
time may be running out on Lt.
Gen. Suharto, the strong man.
The powerful student organi-
zations, whose demonstrations
forced President Sukarno to yield
supreme power, may take to the
streets again unless Suharto gets
a Cabinet together and takes posi-
tive steps to head off economic
collapse.
Antara news agency said the
students declared Suharto should
have a Cabinet free of Commun-
ists and composed of honest people
who have authority to act.
Hits Subandrio Ouster
A spokesman for the group, the
Moslem Party (PSI), said the
foreign policy of Sukarno's ousted
lieutenant, Foreign Minister Su-
bandrio, "has caused Indonesia to
'lose a number. of friends and low-
ered her prestige in the world."
The spokesman also blamed Su-
bandrio,. whose policies alienated
the United State and brought an
end to U.S. aid, for Indonesia's,
economic troubles. Subandrio, gen-
erally considered pro-Red Chinese,
has been arrested.
The Cabinet issue came up again
before a meeting of the five-man
government presidium. Afterward,
Sukarno left for his summer palace
at Bogor, 40 miles south of Ja-
karta, for the weekend, indicating
that there will be no Cabinet de-
cision before next week, because
the new regime needs his assent.
Meets Students
Suharto met with a delegation
of the students and supporting
political parties and complained
about problems of getting the new
Cabinet together.
He said "vested interests" were
trying to name some of the min-
isters. Suharto did not name these
interests, but speculation is that
they could be Sukarno or several
political parties trying to get the
ministries.
Suharto said frankly the econ-
omy is "in a state of collapse but
we should be able now to over-
come some of the economic dif-
ficulties." The students have gone'
back quietly to their classes to
await the results they expect Su-
harto to produce.
Stumbling Block
Suharto's biggest stumbling
block in trying to correct the:
sprawling archipelago's crumbling
economy is formation of the Cab-
inet. He is seeking to build a
tightly knit group of ministers who
can implement an economic pro-
gram that will work.
One factor that has made Su-
harto move deliberately has been
Sukarno. Although Suharto has
taken over power to implement
government policy, he keeps re-
emphasizing that Sukarno is the
supreme commander and the great
leader of the revolution. Suharto
knows Sukarno still is popular
with the masses.
To meet immediate food prob-
lems, the new regime is negoti-
ating with Thailand for rice, if;-
formed sources reported. Indonesia
has no foreign exchange reserves
but some Indonesians believe Thai-
land might offer credits to show
its pleasure at the ouster of Su-
bandrio and other pro-Commun-
ists. Japan and the Netherlands

also may offer credits.

Bonn, United States Advocate
Halt to Nuclear Weapon's Spread

-Associated Press

EAST CHATS WITH WEST

Prime Minister of India Indira Gandhi sits with French President Charles de Gaulle at
Palace in Paris, France. Mrs. Gandhi was the luncheon guest of de ,Gaulle yesterday.
she will fly to Washington to see President Johnson at the White House Monday.

the Elysee
Tomorrow

FIVE-DAY ACTION:
Troops End Coastal Sweep;
Buddhists' Strike Continues

By The Associated Press
As Secretary of State Dean Rusk 1
yesterday was voicing strong hopes
that the major world's nuclear
powers would soon move to agree-
ment toward a ban on the spread
of atomic weapons, West Ger-
many's Chancellor Ludwig Erhard
initiated his own programsto haltr
the proliferation of weapons.
Erhard, in a statement to the
West German Bundestag (Parlia-
ment), subsequently sent to al-
most all the governments of the
world with the exception of Red
China, said his administration
would consent to reduce the num-
ber of nuclear weapons in Europe
sten by step.
Erhard wants countries without
nuclear weapons to promise not to
acquire them, and nuclear nations
to agree not to spread them.
He said the European disarma-
ment agreement must extend to
the whole of Europe, and all, in-
cluding the Soviet Union, must
preserve the present overall bal-
ance of power, provide effective
controls, and must "be linked with
essential progress in the solution
of political problems in central
Europe,"~
The West German proposals
came as Lord Chalfont, Britain's
disarmament minister, was con-
ferring in Moscow with Soviet
Foreign Minister Andrei A. Gro-
myko on a pact to halt the spread
of nuclear weapons. Chalfont was
reported trying to convince the
Russians that the latest U.S. pro-
posal would bar West Germany
from firing a nuclear weapon.
The American proposals in broa'
outline were given by Rusk at a
Washington press conference yes-
terday.
He spoke of a "central underly-
ing attitude" among the nuclear
nations that atomic "proliferation
is dangerous and undesirable."
"I hone very much that we can
move towards a - nonproliferation
treaty and promptly," he said
Such a pact has been discussed at
length at the drawn-out Geneva
disarmament conference.
Nuclear newcomers France anc'
Communist China are not at the
Geneva talks, and Rusk did not
specify how they might be swung
into an agreement. But he declar-
ed progress could come speedily if
"irrelevant" issues such -as Viet
Nam are kept out of disarmament
discussions.
Erhard's spokesman declined tc
take a stand on the American pro-

posal. West German officials are
known to be worried by the possi-
bility that the Communist govern-,
ment of East Germany would be
permitted to sign a general pact
-as it was allowed to sign the
partial nuclear test ban in 1963
West German policy is based on
its claim to be the only government
that represents the German peo-
ple, and on preventing any inter-
national recognition of East Ger-
many.
Erhard's speech and the note
make it plain the present West:
German government does not want
its own nuclear arms. But within
the Atlantic alliance, it wants par-
tial responsibility.
Rusk indicated also that:
" The United States is consid-
ering recognizing the pro-Russian
Asian state of Outer Mongolia.
" He has ordered an investiga-
tion of the State Department's
procedures in forwarding to U.S.
embassies FBI requests for spe-
cial watches on certain American
citizens traveling abroad.
The issue erupted this week with

disclosure of one such message t There probably will be "more
to embassies in Moscow and Paris systematic, formal discussions'
saying Harvard Prof. H. Stuart with France about President
Hughes "reportedly in the past Charles de Gaulle's move to with-
has had strong convictions towards draw from the North Atlantic
Communism." Treaty Organization defense sys-
e Some press reports notwith- tem. But Paris has not yet sup-
standing, he knows of no Hanoi plied the detailed proposals nec-
diplomatic moves for a peaceful essary for such negotiations.
settlement of the Viet Nam war. The U.S. foreign affairs chief
* He hopes that the disputing pictured the policy of others, in-
groups of South Vietnamese soon cluding the Russians, as one of
will work out an agreement, and "containment" of Red China fos-
not lose sight of common danger tered by Peking's own militancy.
-the Communist attempt to take
over.
e Free world countries should
go slow about adding to Red Chi- I
na's "sinews of war" in view of Aftend
Peking's belligerent policies. Thi
referred to West European plans
announced in West Germany, to Em ergenc
sell a $150-million steel plant to
Red China. Conference
"A substantial increase in the'
steel-producing capability of main-
land China is not a very comfort-
able idea-when China is doing
nothing to bring about peace in
Southeast Asia," he said.

SAIGON ()-United States Ma-I
rines and South Vietnamese troops
yesterday wound up Operation
Texas, an offensive sweep on the
central coastal plains, effectively
eliminating the Viet Cong's 1st
Regiment in the process.
Demolition squads capped the
five-day offensive of 5,000 Marines
and Vietnamese troops with 6,000
pounds of dynamite. They blew
up abandoned Communist fortifi-
cations in Quang Ngai Province,
330 miles northeast of Saigon.
With food ranking essentially

as high as ammunition, Marines
turned from that offensive to
score in the defensive role of
guarding a rice harvest. Viet Cong
assault tactics, unsuccessful in
several instances earlier this week,
backfired again.
U.S. Navy and Air Force pilots,
barred from striking at sources in
the Hanoi-Haiphong area, hit
again at its facilities for the
movement of supplies.
Political clouds still hovered over
South Viet Nam's northern pro-
vinces, where Buddhists and stu-

dents are campaigning for a speed-
up in promised governmental, eco-
nomic and social reforms. The
university at Hue, the old imperial
capital, was closed and a general
strike persisted for the third day
in Da Nang.
Nguyen Huu Giao, head of a Hue
student wing of a Buddhist organ-
ization named "People's Struggle
for the Revolution," called on
Premier Nguyen Cao Ky for an
answer by Sunday to Buddhist
demands for a popularly elected
government to succeed his military
regime. Giao said "there may be
violence" if the Saigon authorities
try to block student demonstra-
tions.
In Manila, hundreds of torch-
bearing students and union work-
ers demonstrated before the Phil-
ippine Congress and the U.S. Em-
bassy against President Ferdinand
E. Marcos' plan to send 2,000
Philippine troops to South Viet
Nam.

UnVcamoas
makies
every meal Unicap
a balancedI.i
as far as normal vitamin
needs are concerned

N
A

World News Roundup

By The Associated Press
PALOMARES BEACH - Re-
covery of a United States H-bomb
from the bottom of the Mediter-
ranean was delayed by a minor
mishap. The Alvin, the tiny sub-
mersible which located and pho-
tographed the nuclear weapon in
2500 feet of water on March 1.
got a line around the bomb. But
the line snapped when attempts
were made to tow the stubby
weapon toward shallower water.
* * *
WASHINGTON - Secretary of
State Dean Rusk announced yes-
terday an investigation of the in-
clusion of unproved FBI material
in messages to, United States em-
bassies abroad asking= them to re-
port on travelers' activities.
The issue flared this week with
a disclosure that the State De-
partment had sent, and then can-
celled, an FBI-requested notice to
U.S. embassies in Moscow and
Paris to report back what they
Nsu
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heard concerning Harvard Uni-
versity history professor H. Stuart
Hughes.
The requesting message said
Hughes "reportedly in the past has
had strong convictions toward
Communism," a State Department
spokesman said, describing this
as FBI wording which the dpart-
ment passed along as a matter of
routine.

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