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March 24, 1966 - Image 7

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, MARCH 24, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THRDY AC 4 90T E M C~ i ANe-..... -.

Ii

By HOWARD KOHN
People may read wistfully, with
just a slight trace 'ofenvy, that
the Michigan baseball team- is
leaving tonight for the warm sands
of Arizona and nine days under
a shining sun.
But for the Wolverine players
there will be nothing restful about
playing 14 games in those nine,
days, or facing the defending na-
tional champions three times in
the first two days. And the only
sand on the agenda for Coach
Moby Benedict and, his crew 'is
that on baseball diamonds.
It's the beginning of the season
for the Wolverines, who are em-
barking on their annual assault
against a string of nonconference
foes from the Southwest.
Competition Tough'
"These games are going to be
very important for us. They're not
like the majors' exhibition games,
just getting the guys into shape
or getting a look at all the.play-
ers. The competition is going to
be tough, and we'll put forth a
team effort to, win," enthused
Benedict.
Michigan meets Arizona State
for a' night game Friday and a
doubleheader on Saturday, and
looking at the records, the com-
petition could hardly be more
keen. The Sun Devils slugged their
way to a 54-8 overall record last
season en route to the NCAA
title ) and, as of yesterday, had
lost but three times in their first
14 starts this year.
Two of the losses have been at
the hands of Southern California,
which was rated first in this
week's AP poll. Arizona State was
ranked second.

ne

Heads

for

Sun

Six starters from last year's
championship Sun Devil team
have graduated, but coach Bob
Winkles has a quintet of returnees
back who clubbed the horsehide,
at a combined clip of .292 and
three pitchers who posted a com-
posite record of 22-2.
First baseman Jan Kleinman
(.327)and outfi e lder-turned-
catcher Daffy Dyer (.325) are the

MOBY BENEDICT

two big guns back in the lineup
for Winkles, while John Pavlik
(12-0) and Doug Nurnberg (7-1)
are the returning workhorses on
the mound.
Climate Counts, Too
This experience plus the im-
portant fact that the Sun Devils
have been playing for three weeks
under conditions to which they
are accustomed gives them a dis-

tinct advantage over the Wol-
verines.
"It's not only the change in
temperature that affects our play-
ers, but the humidity. The air
seems very 'light' and a little 140-
pound kid can hit the ball 400
feet. It's especially hard for the
pitchers to get used to . . .they
have to. be very careful of their
pitches because a curve ball does
not break as much," pointed out
the Michigan 'coach.
The oppressive heat, too, can
take its toll on visitors from the
northland. Two years ago when
the Wolverines got off the plane
in Tuscon the thermometer 'read
90 degrees and by the time the
next day's doubleheader was
through, it was over 100.
"Our players understandably
wilted under the strain," Bene-
dict remembers.
'M' Octet Returns
Barring unforeseen develop-
ments, Benedict will have eight
men who lettered for Michigan
last year and who have already
played on the parched desertlands
inFriday's starting lineup.
Junior Bob Reed is expected to
be, the Wolverines' opening pitch-
er, with senior Ted Sizemore be-
hind the plate.
Starting in the outfield will be
Al Bara, Dick Schryer and Les
Tanona, while Keith Spicer, Bob
Gilhooley, Rick Sygar and Chand-
ler Simonds will be in the infield.
Spicer is the only nonletterman
on the starting nine.
Subs See Action
"These spring games could bring
about some changes, though, be-
cause the players will be getting
sore and tired after a while. We'll
move guys around from one posi-
tion to another 'and give the
substitutes an opportunity to get
into the game," explained Bene-
dict. "But we'll still be putting our
best combination of players on
the field."
"Our pitchers have been work-
ing out inside since January and,
should be able to pitch a strong
game. We'll keep them in just as
long as they can keep whipping
the ball."
Benedict has three other hurlers
off last year's team, in addition to
Reed, and sixnew recruits..
Injuryitis,- bane of the athlete,
has been relatively kind to Mich-
igan thus far. "We've been for-
tunate that no one has been side-
lined this spring, because in-
juries can turn a good ball club
into an alsoran. Casey Stengel
used to say, 'I don't manage as
well with Mickey Mantle hurt',"
Billboard
The Ann Arbor Track Club.
will hold a meeting today at
5 p.m. In the 'M' room of Yost
Field House. All persons in-
, terested in running outdoor
track this spring and summer
are invited to attend.

commented Benedict.
The fitness of the Wolverines
will be tested by four other teams
-Arizona, Wyoming, Grand Can-
yon College and Western Colorado
College-in addition to Arizona
State, on their preconference
journey.
Arizona, Arizona State and
Wyoming belong to the Western
Athletic Conference, in which ASU
and Arizona are the traditional
powerhouses. (Arizona's Wildcats
have won nine and lost five this
spring.)
:;Only Automatic That Tracks
and Trips At Gram!

.

x

GUILD HOUSE
802 Monroe
FRIDAY, MARCH 25-NOON LUNCHEON, 25c
RICHARD HOREBITZ
"Aims and Objectives of The Free University"
FRIDAY EVENING DINNER ... 6 P.M.
(Prior to departure for Guild Retreat)
Call 662-5189 for reservations
You can sell
your
TEXTBOOKS
for
CASH,
nyt ime at 8--Q
r EF amE a

U-

MICHIGAN MEN IN EUROPE
HAVE IT MADE-
WHEN THEY BUY, RENT OR LEASE
A CAR IN EUROPE FROM CTE
Write-Phone for Free Car Guide-Low Rote Student Plan
(AR TOURS IN EUROPE, Inc.
555 Fifth Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10017 0 PL 1-3550
Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112, Ann Arbor
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

The India Students Association
and The Ecumenical Campus Center -
present:
PROFESSOR KENNETH E. BOULDING
who will speak on the subject:
"SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC
DEVELOPMENT IN INDIA"
Lecture to be followed with a discussion by
a panel of Asian students
Refreshments will be served
DATE: FRIDAY, MARCH 25, 1966
TIME: 7:30 P.M.
PLACE: Michigan Union, Rooms 3-J,K,L,M
Everyone is welcome

a

IN NCAA MEET:
Fehrs, Porter Ranked'
Championship Contenders

The same dynamic duo that led
Michigan to a second place finish
in the Big Ten title race figures
to anchor their chances in the 36th
edition of the NCAA Wrestling
Championships, which open today
' in Ames, Iowa.
The two individuals, Bob Fehrs
and Dave Porter, are givenex-
cellent chances to cop the titles
in their respective weight classes
by Jess Hoke, editor of Amateur
Wrestling News.
Fehrs rates as a top contender
in the 123-pound class, but not
solely on the basis of his second
place finish in last year's nation-
als. The junior swept to the Big
Ten title this year, picking up the
outstanding wrestler trophy en
route. Added to Fehrs' credentials
SCORES
EVHIBITION BASEBALL
Detroit 3, Atlanta 2
St. Louis 6, Los Angeles 1
Houston 13,'Washington 7
Chicago (A) 4, Cincinnati 3
New York (A) 8, Boston 6
Kansas.City 11, Baltimore 9
Minnesota 5, Philadelphia 4
New York (N) 7, Pittsburgh 6
Cleveland 2, San Francisco 1
Chicago (N) 4, California 3
NHL
Detroit 2, New York 1
NBA PLAYOFF
Cincinnati 107, Boston 103

are two victories over MSU's Don
Behm, who had dropped only one
match in: two years of collegiate
wrestling before meeting Fehrs,
One of the victories was a pin.
Fehrs' prime detractor is Le-
high's Mike Caruso, the same Ca-
ruso who handed him an 8-5 loss
kn the finals of last year's na-
tional meet.
Porter, though only a sopho-
more, gets a better than even
chance in the heavyweight divi-
sion. He annexed the Big Ten
championship by pinning every-
body in sight, including MSU's de-
fending champion Jeff Richardson.
His stiffest~ competition figures :to
come from Moorhead State's Bob
Billberg, a second place NCAA fin-
isher two years ago.
Amateur wrestling experts lean
toward Oklahoma State as the
team titlist. The Stillwater grap-
plers won the Big Eight dogfight
and have a winning tradition of
24 previous NCAA championships.

The Fabulous New United Audio
NUAL
1009
AUTO/PROFESSIONAL
with dynamically balanced tonearm
Use the finest high compliance
cartridges in this superb auto.
matic record playing instru-
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variable speed control for per-
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automatic changer operation
with famous eleva-
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Also SEE and
HEAR the DUAL 1019-
the world's most
sophisticated RECORD
PLAYING instrument.
THE
MUSIC (ENTER,
Inc.
3 stores to serve you:
304 S. Thayer 1304 S. Univ.
717 N. Univ.

q

Pp

.rte.

11

Multipurpose Room,
Undergrad Library

U

I

Do
ACADEMICS
MEAN
NOTHING?
INVESTIGATE
THURSDAY!

PHILIP BERRIGAN*
speaks of his experiences and
thoughts about
"NON-VIOLENCE, CIVIL RIGHTS
AND THE PEACE MOVEMENT"
Berrigan is a poet and the author of No More
Strangers and "Vietnam and American Con-
science"; he has, spent ten years in the South,
working with the Urban League, NAACP, CORE
and SNCC, is co-founder of the Catholic Peace
Fellowship, a memper of the Fellowship of Re,
conciliation, has written for nurerous periodicals
and lectured extensively throughout the United
States.
(Another in the series of University Lectures
sponsored by The University of Michigan,
Office of Religious Affairs)

State St.

Seek ACADEMIC ACTIVITY
and REFORM!!
Direct your ideas and services to the
Academic Affairs Committee of UAC
Meeting THURSDAY, March 24-4:15 P.M.-at the
STUDENT OFFICES, 2nd floor of the UNION

at North Univ.

THURSDAY, MARCH 24--8:00 P.M.

Refreshments

Your Headquarters
In Ann Arbor for JOHN MEYER of Norwich
Ann Arbor Birmingham
29 E. Liberty

5

I

i

U

O~John Meyer of Norwich, In*.

fiff 7-

w A - rr. rnnr r+r

WELCOME'
STUDENTS
Hours Open
MON.-SAT.
from 8:30-5:30
U-M Barbers
near Kresge's
and
Dascola Barbers
near Michigan Theatre

1I

&
41

Campus Financial Wizards ...
do all their banking at Ann Arbor Bank. They appreciate the economy
and convenience of Ann Arbor Bank's Specialcheck checking accounts
. . . you pay just 10c for each check you write .. . there's no service
charges either! Campus financial wizards also appreciate the fact that
Ann Arbor Bank has 3 campus offices . . . and soon to be four .. .
to serve their complete banking needs. If you're not a CFW (Campus
Financial Wizard) see Ann Arbor Bank soon.

,y . _ ti. II .1ln

Trimlittle tucks and agently flaring A-line
skirt-John Meyer's contribution to the spring

f {

I

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