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March 23, 1966 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-23

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PAGE SIB

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 1966

PAGE SiX TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23, 1966

Mustangs Gallop to AAU Finals

COACH DON JAMES:
A Going Man with a Stopping Defense

DENVER, Colo. (A)-The Ford
Mustangs withstood an opening
blast and a closing surge by Ar-
ron, Ohio, to win its semifinal
game 84-81 in 'the National AAU
Basketball Tournament last night.
The Mustangs will meet Bartles-
ville, Okla., in the finals tonight.
Akron broke fast, running up a
14-6 advantage in less than five
minutes. But Dearborn tightened
up its defense and put more zip
into its running game to narrow.
the gap.
Just before intermission, Dear-
born took the lead at 37-36 and
never lost it. With 3:36 remaining
In the game Dearborn led by 15
points..
Then Coach Horace Walker
withdrew Michigan stars Oliver
Darden and Cazzie Russell from
the Dearborn line-up and Akron
made its final bid.
Sparked by Dan Schultz, who
collected 12 points in the closing

minutes, Akron closed the gap to
a mere two points, 83-81, with
four seconds left.-
But Dearborn sealed the victory
when Larry Tregoning made good
on the second of two free throw
attempts as the clock ran out.
SCORE S
EXHIBITION BASEBALL
Detroit 7, New York (A) 4
Baltimore 5, New York (N) 3
St. Louis 6, Cincinnati 4
Houston 5, Pittsburgh 3
Washington 8, Boston 7
Atlanta 4, Kansas City 3
Chicago (A) 5, Minnesota 4 (10 inn)
Philadelphia 3, Los Angeles 2
California 11, Cleveland 0
Chicago (N) 4, San Francisco 2
BASKETBALL
AAU
Dearborn (Mich) 84, Akron (Ohio) 81
NBA
New York 126, St. Louis 125

By DAVE WEIR
From Tallahassee to Ann Ar-
bor.
From an independent college in
the South which has been playing
football only since the end of
World War II to a Big Ten school
which won the first Rose Bowl
game ever played way back in
1902.
From the Tennessee "wide tackle
six" type defense to the Okla-
homa-originated "box" or "four-
deep" style defense.
The first two of the above three
statements refer to Michigan's new
defensive backfield coach, Don
James, who recently ;migrated
north from Florida State Univer-
sity to join head Coach Bump El-
liott's staff. The third describes
the change in Michigan's defen-
sive alignment which James will
institute this fall.
Back Background
In addition to the defensive style
innovation, James brings with him
an impressive football background
both as a player and as a coach.
He was a star quarterback in both
high school and college and, since

graduation, he has amassed 10
years of coaching experience, the
last seven as assistant coach at
Florida State.
In all 10 of his years of coach-

ing, including one year as an as- the regular practice sessions. When'
sistant at the University of Kan- the season starts, I will try to
sas and two years as the head have eight backs ready for every
mentor at a Miami high school, game. It is important in this type
James used the "four-man-deep"j of defense to have two complete
style of defense, a 5-2-4 formation. 'sets of backfield men.' m
This differs from the Michigan Offensive Patterns
formation of recent years, which But Don James' responsibilities,
in football jargon is known as the don't stop when the game starts
"wide tackle six," and is character- Although he derives his greatest
ized by a 6-2-2-1 positioning of satisfaction from watching his pu-
the defensive 11. When Elliott de- pils "cut down the opponent's of-
cided to switch to the Oklahoma fense," he must be continually on
four-deep type, he offered James the alert for changes by the op-
the job of restyling the Michigan position which will cross up the
defense. regular defense. "Most teams wil
Agility-Type design offensive patterns especial-
The new coach indicates that ly for the game against your team.
the success of having four men The coach's job is to quickly de-
deep depends largely upon their termine what these changes are
speed and their ability to pick up and make the necessary adjust-
the potential pass-receivers quick- ments. Our usual approach in pre-
ly. "They must be able to pick up paring for a given opponent is to
the ends and flankers who would key on that team's two best run-
normally be covered by the line- ning and best two passing plays
backers and cornermen. Therefore and, of course, to work upon ways
we will stress speed and agility- of stopping the best player they
type drills in practice. have."
"We also have three basic tackl- How successful have these meth-
ing drills which are so designed ods been in the past? The record
that we go through them on the speaks for itself. Florida State's
day of the game as well as during Seminoles have consistently rated
Blanton, Keen Receive
A thletic Laurels

OLIVER DARDEN

FATHER PHILIP BERRIGAN,!S.S.
"PACEM IN TERRIS AND THE
PROBLEM OF WAR"
FATHER BERRIGAN has been ordained a priest for ten years, eight of which have been
spent in the South. He is noted nationally for his lectures on race, peace, and the
Christian layman. He is a member of the Fellowship of Reconciliation, co-founder of
the Catholic Peace Fellowship,, and has worked in civil rights with the Urban League,
NAACP, CORE and SNCC. His first book, "No More Strangers," was published in
April and deals with race, peace, lay witness, and ecumenism. His other works have
appeared in Commonweal, Jubilee, Worship, Continuum, The- Catholic Worker, and
Inter-racial Review. Currently, he is a parish priest in the Baltimore inner-city.
FATHER BERRIGAN is also a poet and participated in a recent debate at Georgetown
University on Vietnam. The article, "Vietnam and America's Conscience" is a reprint
of his part in that debate.

DON JAMES

Do
ACADEMICS
MEAN
NOTHING?
INVESTIGATE
THURSDAY'
Seek ACADEMIC ACTIVITY
and REFORM!!
Direct your ideas and services to the
Academic Affairs Committee of UAC
Meeting THURSDAY, March 24-4:15 P.M. at the
STUDENT OFFICES, 2nd floor of the UNION
Refreshments-

Fri., Mar. 25th, 1966
Auditorium A

8 P.M.
Angell Hall

Rich Blanton, a senior gymnast
for Michigan, has been nominat-
ed for the newly established Nis-
sen Award to be given annually
to the nation's outstanding collegi-
ate gymnast.
Blanton is one of eight finalists
from a field of gymnasts nomi-
nated by college newspaper sport
editors and accredited gymnast
judges. The Michigan senior suf-
fered only one setback on the rings
in the dual meet season and took
a second place on the rings in
both the Big Ten and the mideast
regionals. He also accomplished a
ninth and fourth rating on the
parallel bars in the two meets.
As for academic accomplish-
ments, Blanton has compiled a 3.3
grade point average in L.S. &
A. as an anthropology major. He
also plans to do graduate work
at Michigan.
Qualifications for the Nissen
Award include both high rank ath-
letic and scholastic achievements.
Among the seven other finalists
is Jim Curzi of Michigan State.
* *f *
Michigan wrestling Coach Cliff
Keen rece ed some national ex-
posure recently when the U.S.
Amateur Wrestling Foundation an-

pounced that he had placed sec-
ond in voting for their Wrestling
Man of the Year award. Harold
Nichols, coach at Iowa State, won
the award. This is the first year,
a coach has been named man of
the year. Ironically, Nichols, who
wrestled at Michigan, was coached
by Keen.

-,

-

high defensively under James' tut-
elage, and in 1964 they were fifth
in the nation in total defense,
finishing third in rushing defense
and first in fumble-recoveries.
Stats Evasive
But stats don't tell the story of
a coach's life any more than a
given formation insures defensive
success. Being a football coach is
not a 10-week occupation, but a
year-round activity. Recruiting is
one of the big off-season respon-
sibilities of all the coaches. They
devote the winter months almost
exclusively to recruiting. James
will be visiting high school pros-
pects throughout a "good part of
Ohio-from my home town, Mas-
silon, west, which includes the
large areas around Cleveland and
Cincinnati."
The nearest thing to a "slack"
time of the year for a coach comes
during the summer, when he pre-
pares a playbook for the upcom-
ing season and keeps in touch by
mail with the members of the
team and with the other coaches.
No 'Off' Season
Although football thus plays a
large part in his life, James does
have time for other activities. His
outside interests include tennis,
golf, hunting and bridge. He is
married with two school-aged chl-
dren and is "as active as possible
in the Lutheran Church.
"It's hard to get away from this
type of job," he explains with a
smile. "Everyone, from the preach-
er to the grocer to- friends and rel-
atives wants to know how the
players are getting along." But
thenkhe quickly adds, "I hate to
think of the day when I would
work on something else . . . it's
great to have a job you really en-
joy. The people you come into
'contact with range from high
school coaches to professionals
from hot prospects to the greatest
athletes in the country."
Psych Helps
James prepared for his coaching
career back in college when he re-
ceived degrees in educational psy-
chology and guidance. He reached
the apex of his career as a player
in college also, as he quarterback-
ed Miami's. Hurricanes to ap-
pearances in the Orange and Gator
Bowls.
James feels that his experience
as a quarterback helps him coach
defensive players that much bet-
ter since he understands the var-
ious tricks and problems of the
opposing field generals.
He finds the Michigan players
cooperative and competent. "These
kids really want to win and their
attitude is excellent. They don't
mind being switched around to
new positions. They can look back
to the Oosterbaans and the Har-
mons and have a lot to live up to
... they have to carry on a pret-
ty well-established tradition."
James looks upon his new posi
tion as a challenge. He says that
this is the "type of challenge I
like ... we have the personnel and
my job is to develop it into a suc-
cessful defensive outfit."
Southern Cal
First in AP
Baseball Poll
. By The Associated Press
TUCSON, Ariz.-The Michigan
Wolverines, receiving five votes for
first place, held down the number
five spot in the season's first AP
collegiate baseball poll.
Southern California, with 17
diamofd victories in its first 20
games, was named the nation's
number one college team.
The poll of sports writers and
college coaches listed Arizona
State University second with Flor-
ida State third.
Michigan plays Arizona -State,
the 1965 NCAA champions, in two
exhibition contests March 25 and
26 while on their Southern tour.

Results of the poll (first-
place votes in parentheses) with
total points scored on 10-9-8-7
basis:
1. Southern California (15) 341
2. Arizona State (10) 293
3. Florida State (8) 276
4. Washington State (8) 273
5. Michigan (5) 210
6. Texas A& M(5) 203
7. 'California (1) 171
8. Ohio State' 164
9. Texas (1) 150
10. St. Louis 148

0

N

0f

EXERCISE YOUR RIGHT AS A STUDENT

DON'T LET OTHERS DO IFOR.YOU!!

RICH BLANTON

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE

I

I

TO ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
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ALL GRADUATES AND UNDERGRADUATES
ELIGIBLE TO VOTE
Seventeen Polling Stations Open 9:00 A.M. to 6:00 P.M.
PRESENT STUDENT ID CARD

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WEDNESDAY NOON BOOK DISCUSSION

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Law Quad
Across from Medical School
Business Administration Bldg.

Frieze Bldg.
Engin Arch
Michigan Union
Fishbowl

T
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UGLI

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Writers & Politics

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NO 8-7942

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teaching
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