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March 18, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-18

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PAGE SIC

THE MICHIGAN DAILY"

FRIDAY, MARCH 18, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY FRIDAY, MARCH 18. 1966

USNSA:

AGAIN AVAILABLE!
"MICHIGAN'S FAVORITE
COLLEGE SONGS"
Words and music of the U of M, which U of M
collegians will want to sing and play.
Available at the L.M.S. and your favorite music or book store.
417 Phone
E. Liberty 662-0675
MUSIC SHUP

Students, SGC To Choose U'
Representation to Conference

Hereditary Illness Researched
For Mental Retardation Cause

.,.
--

(Continued from Page 1)
use the services offered as they
should be used on this campds."
Cooper, at present a regional
representative in NSA, explained
that there has been a series of
chairmen of the NSA committee
this year. John Levi, '69, is serv-
ing presently as ad hoc chairman.
Information Center
"NSA, the largest association of
colleges and universities in the
nation, serves its member schools
through information, consultations
and coordination of common stu-

dent efforts," Cooper said. "In
addition, NSA works off the cam-
pus to represent student opinion
and to carry out program man-
dates derived from the national
congress."
Malinda Schaill, special events
director of Panhellenic Association,
sees the major value of NSA as
"facilitating the exchange of ideas
between schools with similar prob-
lems." She also feels it is "impor-
tant to have people from other
activities than SGC represented
at the congress."

WCBN "PANORAMA"

PRESENTS:

"Students and Politics

II-

ISRAEL'S AMBASSADOR
TO THE U.S.

-Why?"

H. E AVRAHAM HARMAN
speaks at H ILLEL
TUESDAY, MARCH 22, at 8:30 p.m.

Daily Executive Editor Bruce
Wasserstein perceived the follow-
ing functions for NSA:
--To represent student attitudes
on the national level on issues
which affect the campus such as
student deferments and aid to
education.
---To set up a meaningful dia-
logue between American student
leaders a n d foreign students
through conferences and exchange
programs.
-To learn from other student
leaders how various student gov-
ernment innovations and academic
reforms are working on other
campuses.
Differing Viewpoints
Hornberger, former president of
Inter-Quadrangle Council, sees
NSA as a. service organization, not
a political one. He stated, "NSA
should limit itself to those areas
which affect American students as
students and should not dwell in
areas purely political in nature
which do not affect the student
directly. NSA should definitely
fight in areas such as academic
reform, academic freedom and
scholarship and loan programs."
Wall, international co-ordinat-
or, takes just the opposite position.
"NSA should not be concerned only
with the campus and its students,"
he said. "I would like to see a
definite proposal on international
programming, more sponsoring of
seminars on international prob-
lems and more communication di-
rected towards various government
educational agencies."
"All have sinned and come short

Interviews with sociologistsy
politicians, military men
and students
Sund March 20

By KATHIE GLEBE
Drinking problems, depression,
nervous breakdowns and hospitali-
zations, were among the areas in-
vestigated by Prof. Monica Blu-
menthal, associate research bio-
chemist at the Mental Health Re-
search Institute, and her asso-
ciates in their study of carriers of
the hereditary disease, phenyl-
ketonuria.
Phenylketonuria-PKU-is char-
acterized by the lack of the ability
to convert certain types of amino
acids into other types, an essen-
tial body process. If not treated at
an early age it can result in severe
mental retardation.
The disease occurs in persons
carrying two genes for this trait.
The conditions of a person carry-
ing only one such gene is called
heterozygous. These individuals
appear to be normal, but there is
speculation over whether or not
such people are more apt to suffer
from severe mental illness than
normal people.
Heterozygosity
The purpose of Prof. Blumen-
thal's experiment was to deter-
mine whether or not heterozygos-
ity for PKU really is associated
with mental illness.
Prof. Blumenthal and her as-
sociates began experimenting in
1964 on many psychiatric problems
possibly related to physio-bio-
chemical causes.
Three groups were investigated
in a field study: parents heterozy-
gous for PKU (located through
their phenylketonuric children in
various state institutions); a con-
trol group of the parents of non-
phenylketonuric mentally retard-
ed children; and a second control
group of the parents of children
with cystic fibrosis, a chronic in-
herited disease which does not
lead to mental retardation.
Severe mental retardation in a
child causes many difficulties,
both financial and emotional, for
a family with such a child. Al-
though cystic fibrosis does not

cause retardation, it usually leads
to early death and is also a sourcej
of considerable emotional strain
on a family. Control groups were
accordingly selected in order to
examine the relationship between
stress and emotional illness. Such
influencing variables as social
class and race were carefully reg-!
ulated.
Interviews To Investigate
Each of the groups contained
64 nonrelated children. In all
cases the parents of the, children
formed the total population which
was actually interviewed.
The purpose of the interview
was to investigate in detail the
problems arising from having the
affected child in the family and
to evaluate the mental health of
the family members. An interview
consisted of a discussion of the
child's problems, a history of the
parents' efforts to seek help, and
a sympathetic inquiry concerning
specific problems generated by
the child in the home, as well as
the mental health of the parents
and the rest of the family. Typi-
cal interviews were held in the
respondent's home and lasted
from two to two and one-half
hours.
The basic problem in interview-
ing was to devise a method of
measuring the comparative rates
of mental illness in the three
populations investigated. A stan-
dard interview schedule designed

to evaluate a variety of mental
health problems was created. All
the interviews were coded ac-
cording to a formal coding pro-
cedure.
Data Organized
After the interviews had been
thus coded, data relevant to par-
ticular problem areas was or-
ganized into tables; the most im-
portant categories dealing with
drinking problems, depression,
nervous breakdowns, consultation
with physicians and hospitaliza-
tion for emotional problems.
The results of the data analysis
did not support the original hypo-
thesis that persons heterozygous
for PKU are more apt to suffer
from mental illness than other
persons.
Behavior associated with mental
illness tended to be reported more
frequently in the lower class
groups. The interview answers in-
dicated that men had more drink-
ing problems than women, while
women reported a significantly
greater number of nervous break-
depression. Women also sought
downs. and were more affected by
more medical aid for emotional
problems than men, according to
findings in the three groups.
People who had been divorced
reported more hospitalizations,
drinking problems, depression,
nervous breakdowns and consul-
tations with physicians than those
who had never been divorced.

t

All Are Welcome

1429 Hill St.

11

WANTED

9:00 P.M.

MALE psychological subjects
$5.00,

.a 'NX14 " '' { 1 '''. ... . .1 . . .. .. S.. ... .
ORGANIZATION NOTICES
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WCNRDO650

Call Dr. Norman's office
764-6337 or come to
7629 Haven Hall

now serving

University Towers.

I

ll(

of the glory of God."
Romans 3:23

I'

BAPTIST STUDENT UNION
DOCTOR VAN WYLEN
Dean of the School of Engineering
"The Christian Attitude
Towards Redemption"
7:30 P.M., FRIDAY, MARCH 18
1131 CHURCH STREET

CHURCH OF CHRIST
530 West Stadium

11

i

USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN.
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room 1011 SAB.
Bahai Student Group, Fireside, Fri.,
March 18, 8 p.m., 3545 SAB. All wel-
come.
* * *
Americans for Reppraisal of Far East-
ern Policy will meet for a discussion on
Thailand, Sun., March 20, 7:30 p.m.
Rm. 3A, MichiganUnion.
Folk Dance (WAA), Every Fri., 8-11
p.m., Barbour Gym.,
* * *
U. of M. Student Religious Liberals,
Discussion with John Sonquist, study-
director, Institute for Social Research
on: "Conscientious Objection to Selec-
tive Service," Sun., March 20, 7 p.m.;
Unitarian Church. Rides, 6:45 p.m. at
Markley and side entrance Mich. Union.
* * *
Chess Club, March 18, 7:30 p.m., Rm
3B, Michigan Union.
* * *
Guild House, Frl. evening interna-

tional dinner, March 18, 6 p.m., 802
Monroe. Sat., March 19, The Roost,
7-1:30 a.m., 802 Monroe.
1 * * *
Cinema ,I, March; 18 & 19". Charade,'
7 &'9 p.m., Aud. A.
* * *
Newman Student Association, St. Pat-
rick's Day party "Irish Fling," Fri,
March 18. 8 p.m., 331 Thompson. Also
Fri.: Election of Newman officers, 4-E
p.m. & after community supper.
* * *
U. of M Seventh Day Adventist Stu-
dent Association, Discussion group, Dr.
Charles Cridder, prof. of behavioral
science at Andrews Univ., will address
the group March 19, 3 p.m., Rm. 3516
SAB on "A Christian view on Civil Dis-
obedience."
.* * *
Baptist Student Union, Dr. van Wy-
len: "The Christian's Attitude Toward
Redemption," Fri., March 18, 7:30 p.m.,
1131 Church St.
Joint Judiciary Council, All members
of Joint Judiciary Council who are
planning to petition for next fall please
call Ellen at 764-7420, and make an
appointment for an interview.

THE YOUNG AMERICANS FOR FREEDOM
present
DR. LAWRENCE McDONALD;
speaking on
"THE JOHN BIRCH SOCIETY"

ROOM 3C
MICHIGAN UNION

7:30 P.M.
SUNDAY, MAR. 20

in .ti r N ...?, r Srck~ , . ...r",.. ... . . .. ..> ".... . . r:." ... . }. .. .. ,,,..*.*......,..S.......

FREE!

J t~/
- k
tit n

11

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STATEMENT OF DISSENT

March, 1966

We, the undersigned members of the College of Literature, Science, and the Arts, disagree with the reso-
lution concerning Selective Service that was passed at the Faculty Meeting of;.March 7.
The national interest requires the exemption of some able-bodied male citizens from military duty. In each
case, the crucial criterion is the special service that the individual may be expected to render in place of mili-
tary service.
We can not accept the proposition that all college students have the same value with regard to the national
interest. Some students put their ability and time to good use, while others devote themselves primarily to activi-
ties that do not justify their presence on campus. We believe that the best students should be exempted from
military service, that some students merit no deferment at all, arld that'it would be well to apply a sliding scale
to those in intermediate positions. For this purpose, appraisal by grade points and examinations is not complete-
ly satisfactory; but it has substantial validity, and it is certainly more reliable than random selection
In conclusion, we recommend to students that they take their academic work seriously, and we affirm that
excellence has no substitute.

.........
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C"s4;
f.4
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hi.
f:?
JJ{:
3f
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7 Y
TOPKNOT AND BRAID
Ca eoFahins by Dayi and Davi
From campus to date irn a twinklng, beautifully
coiffed for the evening! Just pin on a braid or
topknot fromn our wiglet collection for instant
glamour. Deceptively lifelike, they're made of
soft dynel modacrylic in colors ranging fromn ash
blonde to black.
5.00
MLLINERY
p-
Jacobson

i
t
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t
4

I

ANTHROPOLOGY
Richard K. Beardsey
ASTRONOMY
Freeman D. Miller
Donat G. Wentzel
Richard L. Sears
Peter A. Wehinger
Richard G. Teske
William P. Bidelman
BOTANY-
Alfred S. Sussman
Peter B. Kaufman
Hiroshi Ikuma
Warren H. Wagner, Jr.
C. A. Arnold
Erich E. Steiner
William S. Benninghoff
R. S. Lowry
L. D. Nooden
Charles B. Beck
EdwardG. Voss
Rogers McVough
Erik Bille-Hansen
Alexander H. Smith
C. S. Yocum
R. H. Davis
H. A. Crum
R. R. Stewart
Robert L. Shaffer

ENGLISH
David H. Stewart
Leo F. McNamara
W. H. Clark, Jr.
Kenneth Rowe
Bert G. Hornbuck
John Weber
Alexander W. Allison
T. Gabaty
Robert L. Stilwell
Robert E. Kusch
Warner G. Rice
Shermar M. Kuhn
John Arthos
William H. Coles

GEOGRAPHY
George Kish

MATHEMATICS
George Piranian
Morton Brown
Phill ip S. Jones
A. H. Copeland, Sr.
Erich H. Rothe
G. E. Hay
D. G. Higman
S. J. Taylor
H. Halberstan
L. Cesari
J. A. Cohn
Alleh L. Shields
Frank Raymond
J. G. Wendel
Armand Bruner
Maxwell O. Reade
Bruce M. Hill
Robert E. MacRae
Arlen Brown
C. L. Dolph
Edward S. Thomas, Jr.
Ben Dushnik
John H. Smith
Ronald H. Rosen
Peter L. Duren
Noel J. Hicks
D. J. Lewis
J. E. McLaughlin
C. Lee
F. W. Gehring,
J. M. Kinter
B. Alan Taylor
Robert Berk
Cecil C. Craig

POLITICAL SCIENCE
James K. Pollock
Arthur W. Bromage
Joseph E. Kallenback
William H. Lewis'
Inis L. Claude, Jr.
Samuel H. Barnes
PSYCHOLOGY
E. Lowell Kelly
J. E. Keith Smith
Ward Edwards
Cameron Peterson
Wm. Morse
Lawrence D. Phillips
James V. McConnell
Edwin Martin
Judith Goggin
Dorothy Marquis
Frank Koen
James C. Lingoes

let it rain...
Miss J shines

with lots of swagger

GEOLOGY
E. N. Goddard
W. R. Farrand
F. S. Turneaure
Claude W. Hibbard
E. Wm. Heinrich
Donald B. Macurda, Jr.
Robert V. Kesling
Donald R. Peacor
C. T. Smith
Lewis B. Kellum
E. C. Stumm
D. F. Eschman
GERMANIC LANGUAGES
H. Scholler
F. V. Braun

Nelson G. Hairston
Arnold G. Kluge
Frederick H. Test
David G. Shappirio
Karl F. Guthe
Norman E. Kemp
E. E. Frye
John M. Allen
Dugald E. S. Brown
Alfred M. Elliott
George W. Nace
Helen Gay
T. M. Rizki
A. H. Stockard
William R. Dawson

in the all-weather shape for spring...

all snap and dash in crisp rayon/cotton plus
smart double-breasting, and drawstring.

CHEMISTRY
R. W. Parry
L. Brockway
M. Tames
R. C. Elderfield
Harry B. Mark, Jr.

PHILOSOPHY
Richard B. Brandt

i

I -V ? T 71 1-1 /-"V W-1 ? T1 T'T

40

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