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March 16, 1966 - Image 7

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-16

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE SEVEN

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 16, 1968 THE MICHIGAN DAILY PAGE SEVEN

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I

Young Man's Fancy

Turns to Baseball

SPORTS SHORTS:
Kentucky, Duke Hit by Illness

By DALE SIELAFF
In spring a young man's fancy
turns to thoughts of ... baseball.
In fact, for the members of
Michigan's '66 baseball team,
thoughts of baseball never really
stopped. Through last season, fall
practice, and again starting this
past January, the Wolverines have
been keeping in shape, hoping to
regain the touch that brought
them a national championship in
1962, and working to move up one
spot from the second place finish
of last year.
Last season, the Wolverines fin-
ished behind Ohio State, playing
largely on Coach Moby Benedict's
theory that "you can beg, ball, or
steal a run somehow. More games
can be won through pitching and
defense than anything else."
Despite the amount of time
spent in practice since last fall,
the team has been working under
a handicap; namely, working in
Yost Field House rather than out-
doors.
Playing Second Fiddle
Until this week, the weather
forced the team indoors, where
they played second fiddle to Dave
Strack and the basketball team,
baseball being tucked into two net
4 cages for hitting practice at the
south end of the building.

Behind the plate, Ted Sizmore,
a 5-9, 170 senior from Detroit
Pershing, is back for his third
year, after catching 30 games and
hitting .248. Backing up Sizmore
are three sophs, Larry Prentis,
Jerry O'Neil, and Jim Berline.
Among the infield, Benedict
feels he has the quartet to give
him the defense that wins ball
games, with veterans Chan Si-
monds at first, Rick Sygar at sec-
ond, and Captain Bob Gilhooley at
short. Junior Keith Spicer, a
transfer from the University of
Detroit, will be playing his first
year for Michigan at third in the
spot vacated by Rick Volk, who
may find himself filling the spot
vacated by Wally Gabler on the
gridiron.
Cmejrek Gone
In the outfield, the Wolverines
lost last season's Big Ten batting
champ to the Baltimore Orioles
farm system. Carl Cmeirek hit a
robust .453, with five home runs,
before signing with the Birds
after his first and last Michigan
season.
Three lettermen are back, with
Al Bara slated to hold down the
right field spot again. Bara hit
.339 last summer, good for second
on the team.
Also back are Les Tanona (.290),
and Dick Schryer (.331). Among
the three, they had an average of
.327, almost 100 points over the
team average of .234.
This early in the season, it's
hard to get a coach to make a pre-
diction, unless he happens to be
Leo Durocher, but Benedict did
comment, "It's tough to say any-
thing about the conference this
early, so I'll have to go on past
experience, and name Minnesota,

en by anybody, and anyone can
beat anyone on any given day,
particularly through the pitching.
Suppose a team with a poor record
has one good pitcher and you come:
up against him in a one game
series. He can hold you, and a
team that may be worse overall
has beaten you. But, if you played
them over the course of 10 or 20
games, you'd win most of them,
just like the Athletics might beat
the Yankees once or twice, but
New York consistently takes the
season series.
"In the Big Ten it isn't like
that. You play each team once or
twice, and that's it. You need the
breaks, as well as the team."
The spring trip starts March 25
and runs through April 2, with 14
games scheduled. By the time the
team is back here, the weather
should be better, and the team will
have five days before the season
opener against Detroit at Ferry
Field on April 8. Benedict feels he
has a strong, experienced team.
If he's right, and Michigan is
on top by the close of the season
on May 21 here against Mich-
igan State, maybe the Spartans
won't take the All-Sports crown.

By The Associated Press
LEXINGTON, Ky.-Larry Con-
ley, senior forward on the top-
ranked Kentucky basketball team,
was under a doctor's care -Tues-'
day night after leaving practice'
early in the session complaining'
of chest pains.
Coach Adolph Rupp said, "be-
sides Conley, ten other players
are suffering from colds and some
complain of chest pains . . . It is
true that we have a sick bunch
of boys . .. It looks like the flu
may have hit us."
Conley took himself out of the
lineup after about four minutes
of a scrimmage and was taken
to a hospital.
Hishstatus for the Wildcats
encounter with Duke Friday in
the NCAA semifinals at College
Park, Md., was uncertain.
Duke's Bob Verga was hospital-
ized at Durham, N.C., Monday
with a throat infection and his
status also was uncertain.
Saperstein Dies
CHICAGO - Abraham Saper-

stein, owner of the Harlem Globe-
trotters, died in Weiss Memorial
hospital last night. He was 63.
Saperstein, the dynamic little
sports impresario who found the
welcome mat out for him and his
Globetrotters throughout the
world, died of a heart ailment.
The hospital listed the cause of
death as an acute coronary. Saper-
stein was admitted to the hospi-
tal Friday.
The roly-poly, five-footer par-
layed his trick-shooting, clowning
basketball team into sports' great-

est entertainment unit and dis-
played it in all corners of the
globe.
The door was open to Saperstein
in the Vatican as well as behind
the Iron Curtain. He shepherded
his Negro court magicians through
87 countries, logging 5 million
miles by plane, and won the U.S.
State Department's praise and
gratitude as an ambassador of
goodwill.
SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
BILL LEVIS

BOB GILHOOLEY

MOBY BENEDICT

to win, of course, but we're going
down right out of the fieldhouse.
"The first game is right off the
plane, and Arizona and Arizona
State (last year's NCAA champs)
are fine teams who've been outside
all year."
Benedict also stated that he and
his assistant, Dick Honig, know
what the juniors and seniors can
do, and they're looking for pro-

Ohio State, and Michigan State
(yes, unfortunately the Spartans
have a baseball team, too) as the
toughest teams.
Hard to Evaluate
"But offhand, it's tough to
evaluate baseball. You can be beat-
BIG TEN BASEBALL
1965

Now, with the coming of better gress fromnthesooores to .Li
intespots.,
weather, the outfielders may move in the Losses Light
outside, but the pitchers and in- And Benedict has a host of re-
fielders will stay in Yost, turning turnees to play, losing only three
the area under the basketball front line pitchers and one out-
court into an infield. fielder to graduation, a third base-
But, in spite of what Roy Hof- man to spring football, and an
heinz and the Houston Astros may outfielder to the pros from his
say to the contrary, Bepedict feels first and second teams.
"the only place to play baseball is Bsndisecod tes.
outside. Benedict commented on his
"To get out now though, except pitching, which he feels can be
for some running and fungoes, from 85 to 90 per cent of the game.
would do more harm than good, "It's strong due to experience. We
with sore arms,and the groundlost three good men, and they'll
too soft for infield practice. We're be tough to replace, particularly
at a tremendous disadvantage Clyde Barnhart. He was a real
playing indoors like this, and workhorse."
that's part of the reason for the In addition to Barnhart, Bill
spring trip.'t Wahl and Marlin Pemberton
Off to Cactus Country played out their varsity careers
Each spring Benedict takes the last summer. But with four letter-
squad on a swing through Arizona men back, two lefties, Jim Lyijy-
to "find out what kind of team nen and Joe Kerr, and two right-
we've got, round out the kinks and handers, Bill Zepp and Bob Reed,
play ,urselves into shape. The Benedict feels safe in calling his
weather is good down there, and, staff "sound," especially with the
while I can't *minimize the impor- addition of sophs Geoff Zahn,
tance. of winning, the important Larry Guidi, Nick Radakovic, Pete
thing is to play outdoors. We want McAlpine, and Rod Scott.
'M' Icers Elect Marttila
Captain for Next Season

Ohio State
MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Iowa
Illinois
Indiana
Minnesota
Purdue
Wisconsin
Northwestern

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11
10
9
7
8
6
5
5
6
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2
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7
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Pet.
.846
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.583
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.462
.417
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.400
.067

i

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS
rersen/t
THE OPERA DEPARTMENT, SCHOOL OF MUSIC
OPENING TONIGHT
iii
ROSAtLNLIA
The Max Reinhardt version of
JOHANN STRAUSS' Die Fledernaus
'witb
RALPH HERBERT
as Gabriel Von Eisenstein
JOSEF BLATT, Cond cor
WEDNESDAY thru SATURDAY

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Where Age is NOT
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If you have been told that your age makes a difference
in determining your ability, you've been "toldwrongl"
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GRADUATING ENGINEERS:
Marquardt is conducting engineering Interviews on campus:
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Arrange your interview immediately with your Campus
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* At least half the students working 13 weeks earned
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8:00 P.M.

Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre

Junior Mike Marttila was elect-
ed captain of the Michigan hockey
team for the 1966-67 season yes-
terday, succeeding senior Mel
Wakabayashi.
Marttila was a wing this past
season on the high flying and high
scoring 'Detroit' line. This line
consisted solely of Motor City
natives in Marttila, his younger
brother Lee, and sophomore center
Bruce Koviak.

The new captain showed mark-
ed improvement this year after
being reunited with lirlemates who
he played with while on the Junior
Red Wings in Detroit. This year,
the older Marttila netted 21
points, good for sixth on the Wol-
verine squad.
Wakabayashi was the leading
scorer for the Wolverines a second
year in a row. As a junior, 'Waka'
was a hockey All-American and
leading scorer in the WCHA.

BOX OFFICE OPEN 12:30-8:00 DAILY

0._

TO DAY' S
WEDNESDAY NOON BOOK DISCUSSION
THE MIND OF KIRKEGAARD
by JAMES COLLINS
Discussion leader :James Torrens, S.J.,
Ph.D. candidate, Dept. of English;
Major Hopwood Award for Poetry, 1965
12:00 Noon-2417 Mason Hall
Sponsored by The Office of Religious Affairs
Next Wed. noon: Sarah Mahler discusses two books by Conor
Cruise O'Brien: Writers & Politics and Back to Katanga.
LLI
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