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March 15, 1966 - Image 8

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-15

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PAGE EIGHT

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH 15,1966

PAGE EIGHT THE MICHIGAN DAILY TUESDAY. MARCH 15. 198G

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F

The Lookin Viet Nam:
Confusion, Inflation, Hope

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SAIGON ()- tWhat do the Viet-
n mese people think about such
things as the war, their govern-
ment, the Americans, the future?
Any attempt to answer that
reflects the divergent views and
circumstances that make up Viet
Nam.
Who are the people? Are they
the 80 per cent who live off the
land in this country of 15 mil-
lion? Are they represented by the
military structure that has come
into dominance? Are they the in-
tellectuals, the professional peo-
ple?
Various Groups
All these, with student and re-
ligious groups that have been ac-
tive in the past, make up the
people. There are almost as many
answers to the question of what
they think as there are groups,
or perhaps individuals.
Take Saigon for example. This
once-pleasant city has taken on
the aspects of a tawdry boom
town, but some people seem to like
what has happened. They hear the
artillery every night and they see
flares light up the sky. Some-
times some of them are killed or
maimed in a terrorist explosion.
But the city is jammed with
free-spending Americans and there
is money to be made.
More Shops
Restaurants, bars and cabarets,
souvenir shops and hotels are
springing up all over the place.
The demand for skilled or semi-
skilled labor cannot be met. There
are jobs for almost anyone who
wants to work.
Prices of almost everything have
skyrocketed, however, and the in-
come of a man on a salary has not
kept pace. Some basic foods often
are scarce. The city is jammed
with people who have fled the war
in the countryside. Despite gov-
ernment bans, beggars flock to the
streets. When the midnight curfew
comes, there are sleeping forms,
many of them children, along the
sidewalks and in doorways on they

once fashionable boulevards. There
are poor, sometimes hungry, peo-
ple.
Despite the misery, there is a
"make it now" atmosphere, cou-
pled with the acceptance of a
people long accustomed to war.
True Elsewlhere
Much the same is true in other
cities and larger towns in Viet
Nam. There is a boom, brought
by the influx of more than 200,-
000 U.S. military men, the ac-
companying construction projects
and the rich aid programs.
While the get-rich-quick ele-
ment enjoy it, there is another
side.
"We are corrupting these peo-
ple," said a white-haired American
driving along a bar-lined street.
"After the French and after some
of the things they have been
through with some of their own
governments, I wouldn't have
thought it was possible. But it is."
Feelings Shared
Some Vietnamese share his feel-
ings. They say they realize the nec-
essity for what has happened to
their country. Many are sincerely
grateful for the U.S. military ef-
fort, and say they believe it has
given them their last chance:to
keep from being taken over by,
the Communists. Still, they wish
things could have been different.
As for what they think of the
government, the usual comment
is: "Well, it has lasted longer
than anyone thought it would."
Stable Regime
This is true. When the military
regime headed by Premier Nguyen'
Cao Ky took power last June,
few people gave it much of a
chance. Now, on the surface and
as governments go in Viet Nam,
it appears fairly stable.
"What do you think of Premier
Ky and his government?" was
the question put to one 23-year-
old girl at an English language
school.
"Mr. Ky is a big man now and
so people like him," she replied.

"If something happens and Mr.
Ky isn't a big man any more, then
people won't like him."
Vague View
Her somewhat vague view seem-
ed representative of the thinking
of many of the people and indica-
tive of their acceptance of politi-
cal circumstance.
In the United States, the ques-
tion of free elections for Viet Nam
often is debated. Many ask if
the Vietnamese people would vote
for an anti-Communist govern-
ment.
Here the question seems beside
the point of reality.
No Communist Role
High American authorities con-
cede that when the Vietnamese
government talks of holding elec-
tions, as it says it will do in 1967,
it is thinking only of the election
of non-Communists. It is not con-
sidering any plan for letting the
Viet Cong's National Liberation
Front or any other Communist
group put up candidates.
While saying they know of no
way to insure free -elections now,
Americans here do hold theoreti-
cal discussions on the subject.
Qualified persons emphasize that
for years the Communists have
been working to build what now is
a disciplined, experienced, knowl-
edgeable political machine. They
recognize there is nothing like it
on the Vietnamese government
side, and they leave little doubt
that if there were a free election
now, the majority of the ballots
would come out Communist.
Viets Agree
Although the official pronounce-
ments differ, many Vietnamese
will agree privately with that as-
sessment.
This does not mean that the ma-
jority of the people want to be
ruled by the Communists. Many
are strongly opposed to it. Thou-
sands fled from Communist rule
in the North. It is felt that the
young military men now holding
power are dedicated in their fight
against Communism.
Takeover Predicted
There also are those, however,
who see no real hope.
The wife of a successful Saigon
doctor speaks four languages now.
She plans to take English lessons.
Asked if she planned to visit the
United States, she replied:
"No, we hope to be able to
move there after the Communists
take over."
The tired cliche still holds as
far what the people think and
want: Most of them just want to
be left alone.

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day
Calendar items appear once only
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication.
TUESDAY, MARCH 15
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"How To Train Job Instructors":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Community College Counselor-Stu-
dent Conference-Registration, Rack-
ham Bldg., 8:30 a.m.
Management Development Seminar-
"Management Orientation": Kresge
Medical Research Bldg., 1:30 p.m.
Center for Russian Studies Lecture
-Jurij Borys, Dept. of Political Sci-
ence, University of Stockholm, Sweden,
"Changes in the Composition of the
Soviet Political Elite": 200 Lane Hall,
4 p.m.
Symposium on Japanese Kabuki: Le-
ture-Donald Shively, Harvard Univer-
sity, "The Social Matrix of Kabuki":
Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Robert Streckfuss, euphonium: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30np.m.
Symposium on Japanese Kabuki:
Films and Commentary-James Bran-
don, Michigan State University: Aud.
A, Angell Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
National Teacher Examinations: Can-
didatestaking the National Teacher
Examinations on Sat, March 19 are re-
quested to report to Aud. B, Angell Hal
at 8:30 a.m. Saturday.
GI Bill: The new GI bill becomes ef-
fective June 1, 1966 for veterans who
have served (1) 181 days or more of
active duty which occurred on or after
Feb. 1, i955randadischarge under con-
ditions other than dishonorable, (2) or
discharge for a service disability.
Application forms should be available
on or before April 1. Veterans will be
responsible for obtaining applications,
no mailing list will be maintained.
Natural Science and Natural Resourc-
es Library Hours (3140 Natural Science):
Beginning on Mon., March 14, the fol-
lowing schedule will go into effect for
the remainder of the semester:
Monday-Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m.; 7-11
p.m.; Saturday: 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (Closed
Sunday.)
Dept. of English Language and Lit-
erature Lecture: R. C. Alston, Univer-
sity of Leeds, England, will speakon
"Relationship between Bibliography and
Historical Phonology" in Aud. D, Angell
Hall, Thurs., March 17.
Fall Orientation Leader Candidates:
All candidates are required to attend
the Spring. Leader Training worshop
on Wed., March 16. The program be-
gins at 6:45 p.m. with seminar groups
ORGAN IZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to officially
recognized and registered student orga-
nizations only. Forms are available in
Room loll SAB.
r *.
Guild House, 9 o'clock date hour,
March 15, 9-10:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.
VOICE Lecture, March 16, 7:30 p.m.
Eric Chester on the war in Viet Nam
and its effects on the American econ-
omy, 3rd fl. conf. room, Michigan Un-
ion.
v w *
School of Education Student-Faculty
Tea, sponsored by Student National Ed-
ucation Assoc., Thurs., March 17, 7:30-
9:30 pam., Michigan Rm., League, reg-
ister in 1401 UES by March 15.
* * *
American Chemical Society, student
affiliate chapter. Organizational meet-
ing, 8 p.m, Tues., March 15, Rm. 1200
Chemistry Bldg. Prof. Robert C. Tay-
lor will speak on "Graduate Work in
Chemistry," and answer questions aft-
erwards. All chem. majors or prospective
majors invited.

and will be featured by Prof. Lee
Danielson's 8 p.m. address on "Leader-
ship and Leader Images."
Notification must be made to the
Orientation Office, 764-6290, if a can-
didate is unable to attend due to ill-
ness or course conflict to remain being
considered for a Fall Orientation Lead-
er position.
Elementary Directed Teaching-Fall
Term, 1966: Elementary directed teach-
ing assignments for Fall Term, 1966,
will be made in interviews Aug. 29
through Sept. 2. Each student who has
applied for and ' expects to elect Edu-
cation D305 should make an appoint-
ment for the fall interview in Room
1408 UES between March 15 and April
8. Office hours are 1-5 p.m., Monday
through Friday. Fall placement will be
based upon the names which appear
on the appointment list as of April 8.
Students electing directed teaching
in special education for Fall Term
will receive instructions from Mr. Bates.
Student Government Council Approval
of the following student-sponsored
events becomes effective 24 hours after
the publication of this notice. All
publicity for these events must be
withheld until the approval has bedome
effective.
Approval request forms for student
sponsored events are available in Room
1011 of the SAB.
UAC, Soph Show mass meeting, Van-
denberg Rm., League, March 16,
7:30 p.m.
Foreign Visitors
The following are the foreign visi-
tors programmed through the Interna-
tional Center who will be on campus
this week on the dates indicated. Pro-
gram arrangements are being made by
Mrs. Clifford R. Miller, International
Center, 764-2148.
E. E. Barberii, recruitment and schol-
arship representative of Companie Shell
de Venezuela, Caracas, Venezuela, March
20-22.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
VISTA (Volunteers in Service to
America)-Representatives will b.e in
the Michigan Union March 14-19 to give
information about their program. Men
& women 18 yrs. or older for 1 yr. as-
signments including 4-6 weeks trng.
program. Positions in 50 states, Puerto
Rico, Virgin Islands & Trust Territor-
ies. No appointment needed. Stop by
between 9-5, March 15-18.

& Poli. Set. Positions in theoretical re-
search.
Moser Secretarial School, Chicago -
Women. All degree levels for program
leading to secretarial career. 4-6 mos.
trng. esp. for college women.
Proctor & Gamble, Cincinnati, Ohio
-Women, BA's in any major for posi-
tions in mkt. research. Full time travel
throughout U.S.
McGraw-Hill Book Co., N.Y.C.-Men
BA & MA's in any field of study for
College Traveler to 'promote, scout for
new books, & act as liaison between
publisher & academic world.
POSITION OPENINGS:
Theatre Confections, Inc., Rochester,
N.Y.-Attn.: Seniors & recent grads.
Trainees for concession & vending busi-
ness located in N.E. for firm operating
large chain of drive-in & theatre con-
cessions.
Red Cross, S.E. Mich. Chapter-First
Aid & Water Safety Field Repres.

Man with Physical Ed. or other educ.
bkgd. for 12 month position. Must be
'water safety instructor.
Anchor Hocking Glass Corp., Lancas-
ter, Ohio-Elect. Engr. Degree in EE
plus couple yrs. exper. in plant main-
tenance work. Opportunity for ad-
vancement into plant engrg. & other
mgmt. types of positions. Located in
Salem, N.J.
SUMMER PLACEMENT SERVICE:
212 SAB-
INTERVIEWS:
MARCH 16-
Fair Winds Girl Scout Council, Flint,
Mich.-Head counselor & ass't., water-
front supv., program specialist & busi-
ness manager.
Camp Birch Trails, Wis.-=Girls. Crafts
director, tennis, canoeing & music
counselors. From 1-5 p.m.
Camp Winnebago, Canada - Coed.
Counselors, must be 19 or over. From
4-5 p.m.
MARCH 17-
Camp Oakland, Mich.-Coed. Counse-
lors, men & women. Waterfront direc-
tor, program director & handicraft
specialists.
Camp Pendalouan, Mich.-YMCA. Wa-
terfront director, program director,
cabin counselors & nurse. From 1-5 p.m.
MARCH ,d
Camp_ Yehudah, Mich.-Coed. Cabin

counselors, riding instructor, riflery in-
structor, driver, nurse & cook.
D~avey Tree Co., Kent, Ohio-Earn
money & learn a trade-tree care trng.
Details at Summer Placement, 212
SAB, Lower Level,
ENGINEERING PLACEMENT INTFR-
VIhWS-sentors & grad students. please
sign schedule posted at 128-H West
Engrg.
FRI., MARCH 18-
Generalt Dynamics Corp., Electric Boat
Div., Groton, Conn. & Quincy, Mass.-
Any Degree: CE, EE, EM, ME, Naval &
Marine. MS: ChE, Comm. Sci., Meteor.
& Ocean. Prof.: Applied Mech. BS-MS:
Metallurgy. MS-PhD: Nuclear, Math,
Physics. BBA: Acctg. R. & D., Des.,
Prod., Sales, Test., Info. & processing,
Acoustics. Servo-mechanisms, Num. An-
alysis.
The Rand Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.
-MS-PhD: Aero., Comm. Sci., EE, Me-
teor. & Ocean. PhD: EM. Res. Make ap-
pointment at Bureau of Appointments,
3200 SAB.
Uarco, Inc., Barrington, Ill.-BS-MS:
ME. R. & D.
United Air Lines-BS-MS: Aero., EE,
IE, ME. April, June grads. Citizens &
non-citizens becoming U.S. citizen.
Mgmt. Trng., Market Res., Personnel, &
Purchasing.

A

BENJAMIN SCIENCE PAPERBACKS
For serious students of chemistry, physics and biology here is a new Benjamin series of
elementary, topical paperbacks which deal with the fundamental ideas in science.
Impressive two color illustrations have been used to clarify basic concepts

9

THE STRUCTURE OF MOLECULES
G. Barrow (Case)
HOW CHEMICAL REACTIONS OCCUR
E. King (Colorado)
MOLECULAR BIOLOGY OF THE GENE
J. Watson (Harvard)
NUCLEI AND RADIOACTIVITY
G. Choppin (Florida St.) '
COORDINATION CHEMISTRY
F. Basolo, R. Johnson
THE SPECIAL THEORY OF RELATIVITY
D. Bohm (London)
ORGANIC REACTION MECHANISMS
R. Breslow (Columbia)

THE SHAPE OF CARBON COMPOUNDS
W. Ferz (Florida tS.)
TRACKING DOWN PARTICLES
R. Hill (Illinois)
INTRODUCTION TO SPECIAL
RELATIVITY
J. Smith (Illinois)
BEHAVIOR OF ELECTRONS IN ATOMS
R. Hochstrosser (Penn.)
BIOSYNTHESIS OF MACROMOLECULES
V. Ingram (MIT)
CHEMICAL THERMODYNAMICS
1. Klotz (Northwestern)

INTRODUCTION TO STEREOCHEMISTRY THE TRANSITIONALELEMENTS
K. Mislow (Princeton) E. Larsen (Wisconsin)

Will Committees in
OSA Offer Enough?

PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau of
Appintments-Seniors & grad students,
please call 764-7460 for appointments
with the following:
THURS., MARCH 17-
National Castings Co., Cleveland, Ohio
-Men with degrees in Gen. Lib. Arts
& Econ. for mgmt. trng., prod., & ter-
ritorial sales, Various locations (p.m.
only).
R. R. Donnelley & Sons Co., Chicago
-Men. BA & adv. degrees in Gen. Lib.
Arts, Econ., Gen. Chem., Physics, &
Lib. Sci. for Elec. computing, Mgmt.
Trng., Prod., Purchasing, & inside sales,
Note: Interviewing at Bus. Admin. on!
Wed., March 16, only.
Trans World Airlines, N.Y.C. - Men,
BA & MA's in Gen. Lib. Arts, Econ.,
Statistics, Indust. Rel., & Acctg. for
personnel, inside & territorial sales,
transport., airport ops., finance, etc.
U.S. Office of Education, Wash., D.C.
-BA's in Gen. Lib. Arts; BA & MA's
in Engl., Journ., Geog.; BA, MA &
PhD's in Econ., Hist., Lib. Sci., Math,
Poli. Sci., Psych., Soc. -MA & PhD's in
Educ. for positions in mgmt. trng., sta-
tistics, Govt. Educ, Res, & Program
Admin.
FRI., MARCH 18-
The Rand Corp., Santa Monica, Calif.
-Grad students only. MA & PhD's in
Math, Physics & Astro. PhD's in Econ.

PLATEAU'S PROGRAM
.F. Almgren (Princeton)
CALCULUS OF CHEMISTRY
J. Butler, D. Bobrow
MATHEMATICS FOR INTRODUCTORY
SCIENCE COURSES
D. Greenberg (Columbia)

BIOENERGETICS
A. Lehninger (Johns Hopkins)
ELEMENTARY CHEMICAL
THERMODYNAMICS
B. Mahan (Berkeley)
CALCULUS ON MANIFOLDS
M. Spivak (Brandeis)

M
4

ELECTRONS AND CHEMICAL BONDING INTERSTELLAR COMMUNICATION
H. Gray (Columbia) A. Cameron (Columbia)

THE MOLECULES OF NATURE
J. Hendrickson (Brandeis)

QUANTUM MECHANICS IN CHEMISTRY
M. Hanna (Colorado)

(Continued from Page 1)
mare. It must be recognized that
responsibility for ultimate decision
making rests with the administra--
tion. However, the student can
make a significant contribution if
he has the resources to, draw
upon.1
Barry Bluestone, '66, a mem-
ber of the "University of Michigan
Student Economic Union and for-
mer SGC member, said, "The stu-
dents need a more direct voice
than the one which advisory com-
mittees provides."
Working through "proper chan-
nels" hasn't led to much progress
as far as student. causes are con-
cerned. The students must take
direct stands on issues which con-
cern them and then if necessary
enlist the aid of other organiza-
tions outside the University," Blue-
stone said.
Peter DiLorenzi, of the execu-
tive committee of Voice political
party, said that students should
have more power than they will in
a system of advisory, committees.
"Part of the learning process of
the student is controlling the poli-
cy making of the society in which
he functions. A good example of
this is the Free University, where
the faculty and the students work
together to establish the policies
which they will follow."
Housing Policy
The pilot student advisory com-
mittee, not directly under any of
the nine OSA divisions, is work-
ing on problems of the University's
total housing policy. Cutler estab-
lished this committee last fall
after protests by Voice political
party on the high cost of off-
campus housing.
John Bishop, one of the mem-
bers of the housing committee,
pointed out that first it was diffi-
cult because communication be-
tween the administration and the
committee was not adequate.
At the present time, however, the
committee is functioning effective-
ly because the administration and
the students are working together
on the projects, he said. "Advis-

ory committees can be effective
if the students really work to gain
knowledge, and know what they
are talking about. They also have
to have a good case to present,"
Bishop commented.

STUDUNT BOOK 9L-RVICC-

1215 South University

761-0700
Physics and Chemistry

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Grads Given Voice
By Economics Dept.

Just out:

Harrison-Theory of Metals

I

(Continued from Page 1)
represent student body ideas to the
faculty.
Mass Participation
Effort has been made to get as
mittees, this committee acts to
much student opinion as possible
before submitting final proposals
for faculty action. The committee
on prelims, for example, first
heard student ideas at the second
general meeting, discussed the
proposals with students and fac-
ulty, and recently presented their
ideas to the students in a referen-
dum. The results of this referen-
dum will decide what ideas are to
be presented to the faculty. The
proposal on prelims aims at mak-
II

ing prelims less general than they
are now so a student's specific
area will be covered rather than
the entire field of economics.
This movement to present stu-
dent ideas to the faculty has been
characterized by good participa-
tion with about 30 per cent of the
economics graduate students com-
ing to general meetings and about
70 per cent voting in the recent
referendum.
One member of the central com-
mittee commented that the size of
the economics department makes
it more conducive to closer fac-
ulty-student 'communication than
might be possible in larger depart-
ments.

1

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4

COMPARISON
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a shirt laundered at Greene's is
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Claiming to produce a sparking white shirt is

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That's

2nd ANNUAL
JUDO,
Demonstration
March 19, 1966
7:30-9:30 p.m.

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laundered at Greene's with a brand new one.
See for yourself that even after repeated wear
a shirt laundered at Greene's stays as white as
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Kerchief, headband, tote bag, and sneakers
complete the totally "in" look. Sizes 7-15.
A. Navy with tiny white polka dot:
Jacket. 18.00 A-line skirt.10.00
Vanilla cotton shirt. 6.00
8. Sleeveless shell. Navy,
vanilla. 7.00 Madras-like
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0

NO 2-3231

.I

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