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March 15, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-15

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH-15, 1666

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY TTTESnAY. MARCH 1~ 1Q~

a 7J a:I k7iJi7.a. 1r1 C7.l.bt. 11 x.l. L.7VV

pi

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE
TO- ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
exciting, challenging, and self rewarding. For many years you
have been preparing for this major step that leads from College
to Career. NOW THE TIME HAS COME TO CONCENTRATE AND
ACT; TO FIND THE JOB YOU WANT. With competition for career-
launching jobs increasing at a rapid pace, A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED RESUME IS ESSENTIAL IN OPENING THE BEST DOORS!
Your resume, when written by a Professional Writer, will pinpoint
Your Assets, and present them in a clear positive way. It will save
you Valuable time in contacting the career opportunities You want.
At the RESUME BUREAU your resume is written by professional
writers, with specialized knowledge of personnel practices, and
wide experience in the Business and Technical worlds.
TIME TO START YOUR CAREER CAMPAIGN! 11l! Learn how we
can help you to Sell Yourself, and find the. job you've worked so
hard to prepare for!
WRITE TODAY
RESUME BUREAU, 47 Kearney St., San Francisco, Cal.

M'

Gridders
By CARL RAYFORD lea
wa
Crash! Ummph! Bop! No it bu
isn't a scene from the latest epi-sp
sode of the caped crusader. It is
the sound of the opening day of P
spring football practice. sti
Before the season begins head an
football Coach Bump Elliott must the
do a lot of work in practice ses- iga
sions, for the Wolverine gridders be
have gaping holes left by graduat- pl
ing seniors. Lost are Bill Yearby,
Wally Gabler and Tom Mack, only
to mention a few, and the losses ba
total 17 lettermen, nine of them Sy
starters. However, with the help
of promising freshmen the grid- ot]
ders could be ready again.'
The squad will get a boost from de
an experienced offensive backfield,
headed by returning Jim (Diesel) Bi
Detwiler, who sat out most of lastPh
season with an injury, plus good
understudies. Also on hand will be pi
a game-proven nucleus of defen- 9
sive backs. co:
Twenty-six of the players prac- th
ticing now are returning letter- st
men. an

Begin

Spring

Practice

nged possibly by Rick Volk. Volk
as on the baseball team last year,
t he has decided to skip the
ort this spring.
From last season the Wolverines
ll have Carl Ward, Dave Fisher,
d Detwiler askball carriers. At
Le running back position Mich-
an has no particular weakness
cause there are sufficient re-
acements waiting to play.
Equally strong is the defensive
ckfield, with Mike Bass, Rick
gar and possibly Rick Volk if
does not quarterback, for an-
her season.
Hard Time for Lines
Hardest hit by losses were the
fensive and offensive lines.
ere, previous second-stringers
11 Hardy, Paul Johnson and Ray
hillips are expected to be im-
oved and ready this year.
The outcome of Michigan's up-
)ming football season depends on
e ability of the newcomers to
ep in and play Big Ten football,
ad play it well.
Not only are large-scale changes

and Don Dufek, defensive back-
field coach, have both departed
for private business.
Fitzgerald Promotedj
D e n n i s Fitzgerald, presently
assistant wrestling coach and for-
merly freshman football coach,;
has moved up in the ranks to take
over Hollway's position.
Don James, from Footballtown

(Massilon), Ohio, has left his fill the new slot.
Florida State assistant's post to Fitzgerald's promotion to varsity
assume the duties Dufek once has left the post of freshman
carried out. coach vacant. The position is ex-
A new coaching position has pected to be filled in the near fu-
been created, that of assistant to ture. as one of the jobs of the frosh
Tony Mason, offensive line coach. mentor is recruiting. Time is
George Mans, 1961 Michigan cap- short: tenders go out to high
tain and former assistant at East- school prospects on the first day of
ern Michigan, has been hired to April.

*

'AS BEST SPORTS WRITER
Lloyd Graff Receives Award

DON JAMES

ly

Clancy Back

1

APRIL 196
GRADUATION ANNOUNCE MENTS
on sale
Mon., Mar. 14; Tues., Mar. 15; Wed., Mar. 16
in
FISHBOWL
also.... AT MUSIC SCHOOL

Jack Clancy is one of the most being made in the playing per-
promising of the returnees. Last sonnel, but the coaching staff is
year he caught 52 passes for 762 also acquiring new faces now that
yards, a new Michigan record. Bob Hollway, defensive line coach,

IIf the offensive backfield can
remain healthy, it will be one of
the most powerful in the confer-
ence. Only one place is unsettled,
quarterback. Dick Vidmer, an ex-
perienced candidate, will be chal-
Billboard
Table tennis enthusiasts can
compete in the 1966 Ann Arbor
Open Saturday at the Forsythe.
Junior High School, Newport
Road off Miller. Midget and
junior play are scheduled for
the morning, with novice, Class
'A', championship and open
doubles set for the afternoon.
Entry fee for each event will be
75c. Trophies will be awarded
for first and second places.

By HOWARD KOHN
There really is a Lloyd Graff.
The guy who's been expounding
on Peter DiLorenzi, fat ping pong
players, contemplations in the Arb,
and Papaya A&M etc. for the
past two years is for real.
Yesterday the Daily's favorite
columnist and mystic was named
the best college sports writer in
the country by the Larst Publish-
ing Company of Evansville, In-
diana. The award entails a $200
cash award for the first place
finish in a field of over 200 na-
tionwide college writers.
It's the Principle of the Thing
"I'm not only happy about the
money but because somebody ac-
tually realizes I've been writing
sports," commented Graff. And
then, in a typical afterthought,'
"I'm thinking of spending the
money on tulip bulbs ...and
baseball cards."
That's Lloyd all over. For those
who remember his column on Bert
C a m p e n a-r i s, the all-around
Charley Finley protege, his pointl
of versatality in a world of spe-
cialization can serve to introduce
a guy who wants to become a
professional satirist "better than
Art Buchwald," a baseball pitcher
for the Cubs, and "most of all a
humanitarian."
He's going to law school next
year to learn about the Great
Society for that future political)
column but he vows that "if I
have time I'll stop over at Phoenix
and become a Chicago Cub first'
stringer."
"The Cubs Will Be First"
"My arm is the strongest since
Kouf ax. The only reason I haven't!
made it big was an unfortunate
wild streak back in high school1

(which stopped my career when
I hit the coach three times in
three pitches). But I'd still do it
now if it wasn't for the draft
board.
"Of course, even if the White
Sox (yehh!) offered me a $100,000
bonus I wouldn't take it
$110,000? . . . maybe . .."j
To complement his array, of
aspiration are some even more
unbelievable real-life memories.
"There is the time I helped Bill
Bradley score his record 58 points
. . . and the time I led a throng
of frozen fans after the wrong
plane," says he, reminiscing at the
age of 21.
NCAA Record ... Whose?
"I was sitting behind Prince-
ton's coach, Van Baren Kloff, in
the press box at the NCAA's last
year when I, or rather Bradley,
broke the record . . . I was keep-
ing track of his points and when
I realized he had a chance to
Grapefruit
Baseball
YESTERDAY'S RESULTS
Pittsburgh 5, St. Louis i
Cincinnati 4, Houston 2
Chicago (A) 4, New York (N) .1
Atlanta 2, Baltimore 0
Philadelphia 5, Minnesota 3
New York (A) 5, Boston 4.
Detroit 4, Los Angeles 4
San Francisco 5, Chicago (N) 4
Cleveland 5, California 2
TODAY'S GAMES
New York (A) vs. Atlanta
Cincinnati vs. Pittsburgh
Houston vs. Chicago (A)
Los Angeles vs. New York (N)
Philadelphia vs. Boston
St. Louis vs. Minnesota
Washington vs. Baltimore
Chicago (N) vs. San Francisco
California vs. Cleveland
Kansas City vs. Detroit

break Oscar Robertson's 50-point
mark, I figured I'd help out.
"'Hey, coach,' I gushed, 'Bill's
only six points from the record'
. .and without turning around,
he shouted out on the floor, 'Give
it to Bill,' . . . and after a couple
more prodding messages, there we
were with a new record . .."
Lloyd is the same guy who join-
ed the sports staff, out of pref-
erence to trying out for the fresh-
man basketball team back- in 1962
against Cazzie Russell and team-
mates. "I played against Caz,
though, in a game at the IM
Building. . . and blocked one of
his shots." And he's the same guy
whose feature story on Russell,
which first appeared in the Daily
Magazine, was recently reprinted
in the National Observer.
It Was Dark Out
His most vivid recollection of the
past four years, however, is that
ridiculous chase through "three
degree weather after a plane which
DIDN'T carry the Michigan foot-
ball players.
"It was after they clinched the
Rose Bowl berth in 1964 . . there
were 7500 of us waiting for the
team to arrive. All of a sudden,
someone said 'Here they come'
and we all rushed out. It was the
wrong plane, and the pilot-ter-
rified "by this mass of people-
turned his plane around and
taxied back down the runway with
us in hot pursuit . . . and me in
the lead, looking for a story.
Whether Larst Publishing knew
all about Lloyd is doubtful, but
they did select him as best. And
as Daily associate director Bob
Carney was quick to point out,
"They knew he wasn't afraid to
take a chance on a story .'... any
story."
But amid all the excitement- at
the award, Lloyd sat thoughtful
over at the UGLI last night think-
ing about the all-campus ping
pong tournament. "I lost yester-
day," he said sadly. "I just choked
up. It's the first time I haven't
been in the quarter finals in four
years."
Tell me he's for real.

A
V

I.

I

GEORGE MANS

NIGHT EDITOR:
JOHN SUTKUS

II

sR

(formal wear)

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ki i
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l^ .

f

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COMPLETE OUTFIT
Traditional tuxedo, tropical weight,
55% Dacron Polyester / 45% Rayon,
natural shoulder, plain front trouser,:
shawl collar...... ...*.. ....1 52,50
Formal Shirt................. 5.95
Cummerbund and Tie Set..... 4.50
Stud Set . . . ................. 4.50
Suspenders .. . . . . . ........... 1.50
Tux Hose . ............... .... 1.4
indivdual items total 699

mathematics, physics,
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%a

On Campus
Interviews
Represepntative

IL !

Special
Combination Offer
Complete outfit described
have:

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