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March 15, 1966 - Image 3

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-15

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TUESDAY, MARCH 15, 1966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGEW TUER

TUSAMRC!1,166TEMCIGNDIYPA TT?

A M" JUJ A " XVr, 0

ot

'Experts

See

Shelepin

As

Soviet

Heir

Apparent

MOSCOW (P)-A poll of Krem-
lin-watchers in Moscow today
probably would choose Alexander
N. Shelepin as the man most like-
ly to be running the Soviet Union
in the 1970's. They will be watch-
ing carefully this month for clues
to support this judgment.
The 23rd Soviet Communist par-
ty congress opens March 29, and
Shelepin is considered to be the
man in charge of organizing this
important meeting. The congress
will provide an occasion to gauge
Shelepin's role.
At the moment Shelepin is a
member of the party's powerful
secretariat and of the Central
Committee's ruling Presidium. At
47 he is still young for the top
command.

Little things showing through
his public utterances' have creat-
ed apprehension about Shelepin
among some intellectual and youth
groups. One foreign expert on the
Soviet leadership calls him more
dictatorially inclined than his col-
leagues. Yet a Soviet colleague
who worked closely with him de-
scribes Shelepin as shy, even
timid, a hard man to know.
The lights glisten on an extend-
ed forehead of approaching bald-
ness and catches the shadows of
thickening jowls. A small scar
runs diagonally across a wide nose.
The left eyebrow arches higher
than the right, giving distinctive
character to what otherwise might
be an expressionless face.
Alexander Nikolayevich Shele-

pin was born Aug. 18, 1918, almost
a year after the Bolshevik revolu-
tion. His official biography says
he was the son of a railwayman
in Voronezh, 300 miles southeast
of Moscow.
At 18, Shelepin entered the Mos-
cow Institute of History, Philoso-
phy and Literature, a school for
young men marked for future
leadership. The Stalin purges were
on then, and Shelepin stepped in-
to purge-created vacancies in the
school's unit of the Communist
party Youth League, in the Kom-
somol.
Three years later, in 1939, Shel-
epin was sent into the army as a
political instructor and squad
leader in the war against Finland.
He served only briefly.

Some sources say Shelepin was
a partisan leader behind Nazi lines
in World War II, but the official
biography indicates he remained
in civilian party work.
Shelepin became first secretary
-chief--of the young Communist
League in November 1952, at a
time when Stalin-believed to be
preparing a new purge - wanted
reliable men in key spots. If a
purge was in the offing, Stalin's
'death in 1953 interrupted the
process.
Shelepin's standing as a good
Stalinist was underscored in 1952
at the 19th party congress when
he was named to the Central Com-
mittee, the party unit of 175 full
members in whose name the nation
is run.

Running the Komsomol was a
tough job. As Nikita S. Khrush-
chev acceded to authority, he
needed manpower to open up his
"virgin land" farm areas in cen-
tral. Asia. It was up to Shele-
pin's Komsomol to get volunteers
from the rugged pioneer work.
Khrushchev's 1956 exposure of
Stalin as a tyrant created prob-
lems for Shelepin, whose Komso-
mols had been taught that the dic-
tator was a god. He warned young
people against "distorting our So-
viet reality."
At the same time, he opposed
the sweatshop system, argued that
young people should not be assign-
ed industrial jobs against their
wills, and urged better working
and housing conditions to make

industrial jobs more attractive.
In April 1958, Khrushchev as-
signed Shelepin to handle the par-
ty secretariat's organizational
work. Eight months later, Shele-'
pin became chairman of the Com-
mittee for State Security-KGB
-the current name of the Soviet
secret police.
By this time the secret police,
which had been a dread, inde-
pendent arm of Stalin's power, had
been greatly reduced in author-
ity. Shelepin's appointment was in-
terpreted as a Khrushchev asser-
tion of party control over the po-
lice.

named a Central Committee secre-
tary, although he apparently con-
tinued to oversee the KGB. Then,
in 1962, Khrushchev created a
powerful new job for Shelepin:
head of the Party and State Con-
trol Committee. This carried a
deputy premier's rank and the
right to pry into almost every
facet of Soviet life.
After Khrushchev was over-
thrown in October 1964, Shelepin
rose another notch, to full mem-
bership in the 12-man party Pre-
sidium. There were indications
Shelepin had played an important
role in Khrushchev's ouster.

tariat: First Party Secretary Leon-
id L. Brezhnev, Mikhail A. Sus-
lov, an old Stalinist and ideolog-
ist, and Soviet President Niko-
lai V. Podgorny.
Podgorny moved out of party
work last December to become
president. Shelepin gave up his
deputy premiership and chairman-
ship of the control committee.
The explanation: he would con-
centrate entirely on party work.
Some speculated that this
meant a loss of power. But the
deduction disagreed with all avail-
able Communist sources in Mos-
cow who said Shelepin now had
taken over from Podgorny as "sec-
ond secretary," the second most
powerful man in the party after
Brezhnev.

Shelepin gave up the KGB job Only three other leaders belong-
in November, 1961, after being ed to both Presidium and secre-

U.S. Seeks
New Contact
With China
Humphrey Claims
Policy Objectives Not
Clinese Isolation
WASHINGTON ()-The United
States is pressing Communist
China through public and diplo-
matic channels to lower barriers
between the two countries, offi-
cials said yesterday, and the next
effort probably will be made today
in a meeting of ambassadors at
Warsaw,;Poland.
A declaration by Vice-President
Hubert H. Humphrey that the U.S.
is following a policy of contain-
ment of Red Chinese power with-
out seeking to isolate China from
the rest of the world was viewed
in official quarters as an attempt
also to get across to Peking the
U.S. interest in opening contacts.
The main purpose of Hum-
phrey's statement during a televi-
sion-radio interview Sunday was
said to relate to the continuing
debate here over Johnson admin-
istration policies in the Vietna-
mese war and the Asian conflict
generally.
White House Denial
The White House denied that
Humphrey was revealing any sig-
nificant change or switch in U.S.
policy toward China and said rath-
er that what he was doing was
trying to emphasize a "flexible at-
titude of mind" on this issue which
"the administration has always
maintained."
Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-
Mass) said he would support Hum-
phrey's view that China should be
contained but not necessarily iso-
lated. Interviewed during a speak-
ing engagement in Detroit, Ken-
nedy said he would oppose admis-
sion of Red China to the United
Nations but would favor its par-
ticipating in any Viet Nam peace
talks.
Some politically minded observ-
ers thought Humphrey probably
was trying to readjust his own
personal position. Upon returning
from a Far Eastern tour recently
he jumped into the hot argument
here over giving Communists a
place in a coalition Viet Nam gov-
ernment which might be set up in
Saigon someday-a line of action
Sadvocated 'at one, point by Sen.
Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY).
Coalition Attacked
Humphrey attacked the idea of
imposing a coalition regime or let-
ting the Communists negotiate
their way into the government al-
k though he stood on the point to
which Kennedy and the White
House had already agreed - the
point that the United States would
abide by the outcome of free elec-
tions even if it meant some Com-
munist power.

MORE INDIAN VIOLENCE:
Mobs Rock Delhi
In Language Riots
NEW DELHI (P)-Rock-throw- one armed with a spear and
ing mobs clashed with police and others with swords, rushed
burned cars in New Delhi's streets yelling. The mob ran before
yesterday as a violent outburst ofH five bearded men
language rioting swept parts of! Hindus March

Suharto Orders Communists
To Resign All Military Posts

SINGAPORE (R)-Lt. Gen. Su-
harto ordered all Indonesian Com-
munist officials of whatever rank
the to surrender to local military
out commands by the end of March,
the Radio Jakarta reported yesterday.

1
1
J
t

i

the capital.
At nightfall, reinforced police1
squads fired tear gas and imposed
a curfew on the old sections of,
Delhi and stood between Hindi-
speaking Hindus and Punjabi-k
speaking Sikhs.
Although there has been rioting;
in neighboring Punjab State for
three, days, this was the first,
eruption of trouble in Delhi. At
times, mobs of 5000 or more were
on the rampage. -

Pro-Hindi groups marched about
the city forcing shopkeepers to
close and support a general strike
call.
The U.S. Embassy advised all
Americans in the capital not to
travel on the streets unless neces-
sary.
India's language troubles stem
from the fact that the nation has
16 major tongues and 100 dialects.
Each language group vigorously
defends its language as an im-
nnt~t tafn f hai ilir o

The new Indonesian strong man j
warned that action will be taken
against those ignoring the order.
He also directed all political par-
ties to accept no Communists as1
members.
A big rally will be held today,
to show the people's "utmost gra-
titude" to Suharto for banning
the Communist party-his first of-
ficial act on assuming power Sat-
urday-the radio said.
Support Declared
The broadcast declared state-
ments "of support, jubiliation and
gratification" were still flowing in

to Suharto for taking over the
government.
Informed sources in Singapore
said Suharto and his supporter,
Gen. Abdul Haris Nasution, were
consolidating their position and
were receiving pledges of support
from provincial chiefs and politi-
cal organizations throughout the
nation of 3000 islands.
President Sukarno fired Nasu-
tion as defense minister last
month, touching off violent stu-
dent demonstrations that finally
led to the switch of power.
Radio Jakarta was careful to

say Suharto took over on order
from Sukarno and all orders were
issued in the name of the presi-
dent, who apparently still is in
his palace in Jakarta.
New Cabinet Expected
Informed sources in Singapore
said Suharto is expected to' an-
nounce a new cabinet shortly, in
which Nasution will have a pow-
erful position, possibly as vice-
president. The sources expected
Sukarno to remain as a figure-
head president - "unless he tries
to get cute," as one informant
phrased it.

-Associated Press

. Punjab Partition ~ ~~ ,0 ,1I L1~~4±
Punja Parttionportant part of tneir. cuiture anda
Trouble began with the govern- community identification.
ment's decision last week to par-
tition Punjab to give the Sikhs ! MAY GO TOMORROW:
their own language state. The
right-wing Hindu group, Jan
Sarh whiocedands hatHiondu a
guage, immediately launched agi- Ca s
ration. ' C u e e i
Violence spread throughout Pun- G
jab, with police firing on mobs in
several cities. At least two per- CAPE KENNEDY A)-Troubles
sons were reported killed. struck the Gemini 8 rendezvous
In New Delhi, aboutr40 persons and spacewalk mission yesterday.
were injured, and more than 200 forcing at least a one-day launch
arrested. The mob burned five delay, until tomorrow, of man's
cars, one Jeep and four scooter first try at hitching two vehicles
taxis in one street of Chandni together in space.

l and Cabin
ii Launch Halt

JE
t'1
it
11

II L

STUDENT
SESQUICENTENNIAL COMMITTEE
Announces
The Opening of Petitioning for
INTERNATIONA L STUDENT
CONFERENCE COMMITTEE
Information and Petitions available
through March 25
in the Sesquicentennial Office on the
first floor of the Michigan Union

SEEKS $13 BILLION FOR ASIA
David E. Bell, foreign aid administrator, appeared yesterday
before the Senate Appropriations Committee to carry on the
administration's drive for emergency funds to meet rising military
and economic costs in Southeast Asia.

launch schedule.
Neil A. Armstrong and David
R. Scott, handed one of the tough-
est assignments yet in the na-
tion's space program, took advan-
tage of the extra day to bone up
on tricky spacewalk procedures. I=

World New,
By The Associated Press
NEW YORK-The stock mar-
ket skidded sharply again yester-
day in moderate trading.
The Dow Jones average of 301
industrials slumped 10.86 to 917.09.
Brokers blamed the decline!
mainly on further reaction to the
tight money and credit situation.
Volume increased to 7.41 million
shares from 7.01 Friday.
OTTAWA-Prime Minister Les-
ter B. Pearson ordered a broad in-
vestigation yesterday into alleged
links between the previous Con?.
servative government and a blonde
German refugee now in West Ger-
many.
Pearson announced the inquiry
at a dramatic session of the House
of Commons called to consider the
case of Gerda Munsinger, 36,
whose name has been coupled with
those of members of former Prime
Minister John Diefenbaker's cab-
inet.
The charges against the Con-
servatives were made last week by
Justice Minister Lucien Cardin,
who did not identify the former
officials he said were involved, but
suggested Canada's security may
have been endangered. He charged
Mrs. Munsinger was engaged in

SChowk.
Jan Sangh sent a huge mob at
the Sikhs' Sisganj temple in Chan-
di Chowk. The Sikhs herded
their women and children inside
as the mob began hurling stones.
espionage before coming to Cana- The Sikhs, some brandishing
da in the 1950's. She has denied swords and spears, then charged
being a spy. out, scattering the mob with their
own rock barrage. Police stepped
SAIGON - Screaming over in and many of them were hit.
mountaintops yesterday, United Turn on Shops
States Marine .and Air Force jets, Hundreds of demonstrators then
pounded a North Vietnamese regi- uned of dkonsos hs
ment holding the Ashau Special mounted policemen and tear gas
Forces camp, apparently silencing squads rushed throughout Chand-
its antiaircraft defenses despite squads ry toughot hrder
the heaviest groundfire yet en- Chowk trying to restore order.
countered in South Viet Nam. A newsman watched one mob of

Officials decided to postpone
the spectacular space doublehead-
er after technicians discovered vol-
atile fuel loose inside a 66-foot
Atlas rocket,and a leaki n the
spacecraft's cabin air recircula-
tion system.
Within a few hours, the problem
in the Atlas, to be used to launch
Gemini 8's Agena rendezvous tar-
get, was isolated. Officials were
confident the rocket could meet
the new launch date.
However, the spacecraft problem
seemed to be more serious. The
leak developed in the space suit
circuit which separates moisture
from recirculated cabin air during
space flight.
A spokesman said a section of
the system might have to be re-
placed, and it might be this morn-
ing before it could be determined
how seriously if affected the

Riding a Rusty Racer?

1

instead

Officials in Saigon said no U.S.'
planes were lost and that the
bombing and strafing attacks on
the Laotian border camp destroy-
ed one building and knocked out
five mortar positions.

about 100 storm a shuttered Sikh
shop. Some members of the mob
climbed to the roof and hurled
rocks down at Sikhs in an inner
courtyard. Then, the front gate
was flung open and five Sikhs,

I

I

SEX and LIQUOR are International!
" Join UAC's International Affairs Committee

Bike About On A
BEAVER
BEAUTIFIED BICYCLE
Rejuvenate that Racer at
605 CHURCH ST.

I

OPEN MEETING
THURSDAY, MARCH 17
ROOM 3X, MICHIGAN UNION

i .. : -.: ;al

This is

FOOD!

SHERUT LA'AM WEEK

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Watch for details

MARCH 18,

1966

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it

w.

The University of Michigan
Gilbert and Sullivan Society

ZAP, BIFF, POWIE!!
BATMAN isVOTING in the
SGC ELECTION
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 23

I

S
nter . ow se za
proudly announces its first
- EXECUTIVE BOARD
M crCeAtaNryKEesdettreasurera
E MARCHA VAN DYKE SHERRY MEYER JOHN SAVAGE
housing exec. vice-president recreation
RUSSELL JENNINGS DAVID SATCHELL JOHN DALBY
service administrative v.p. orientaNon GA
S MARY LOU CURRY BARBARA TAYLOR LAWRENCE OZGAa
ii,,Ait elafi4#nlIC vhrci brojects actiitfies'Nscho1lasticLii

S

Presents

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IUDDE9OEO

I

Ma rh 23. 24.. 25.. 26-8:00

WA/YJ flflI'T YO I I.

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