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March 12, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-12

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PAE SI

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, JIARCH 12, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY SATURDAY, MARCH 12, 1966

CIVIL ENGINEERS
wan to f live in Ann Arbor?
CIVIL ENGINEERS WANTED BY THE
CITY OF ANN ARBOR
Sa lary $6,734 with B.S. and $7,410 with M.S.
with rapid increases scheduled.-

Kentucky Trim

By CHUCK VETZNER1
Acting Sports Editor
Special To The Daily -
IOWA CITY - Adolph Rupp
looks too old and tired to even ;
get off the bench during time outs.
But the venerable old baron of
basketball usually manages to get
up the energy to provide a timely
word of advice.
He did it last night as his
Kentucky Wildcats fashioned a
comeback 86-79 win over Dayton's
Flyers. Trailing 64-59 with 10:45
to go in the second half, Rupp
called a time out. During the
next one and a half minutes the
Wildcats reeled off nine straight
points and never trailed after-
wards.
"The trouble with our trap de-
fense," said Rupp, "was that we
were setting our traps a second
too late. We ,rectified that and

then we were OK." -
"Those nine points definitely
had to be the turning point,"
commented Flyer coach Don
Donoher. "Tonight Kentucky was
the nation's number one team and
still is in my book."
Dayton closed to within one
point three times afterwards, the
last being with 2:30 remaining.
But the Wildcats' clawing defense
and pressure preformance kept
the Flyers from closing the gap
any further.
In the final minute Kentucky
used a perfectly-executed stall to
actually increase their lead.
High scorer for the Wildcats was
little Louie Dampier with 34. Part
Riley added 29. Thad Jaracz
chipped in 17.

s Dayton,86-79
Speaking of Dampier, Rupp Dampier actually ignited the
praised, "Offensively this was his Wildcat rally by scoring seven
finest game." straight points to erase the Flyers'
Henry Finkel of the Flyers led five-point lead. The All-America
all scorers with 36 points. scored 21 of his markers in Ken-
"He really uses all seven feet tucky's decisive second-half drive.
of that thing," added Rupp. Where Dampier left off, Riley
The Wildcats were two points took up the slack. With three
down at halftime, but even while minutes left and the game still
losing they looked the part of a in doubt, Finkel pulled off a three-
championship team. point play to trim Kentucky's lead
Dampier and Riley cut in under to only one at 76-75. Riley thenj
the basket beautifully to evade popped in six points in the next
Finkel's swipes at the ball. The few moments to build up an 84-1
Wildcats' passing was reminis- 77 lead for the Wildcats.
cient of the UCLA razzle-dazzle All told, the close contest wast
style. tied seven times and the leadj
Kentucky's main problem was changed hands 12 times.
turnovers. But once they settled Dayton bowed out with a 22-5
down in the second half they were record while Keiitucky upped its
able to control the game. record to 25-1.

The city of Ann Arbor offers security plus the
finest municipal fringes benefit program in the
state. All interested engineers are requested
to contact the Personnel Dept., city of Ann
Arbor, City Hall.
AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER

IN NCAA MEET:

Margin for Error
Gil Saiuierg
Summer in New York:
Of Kings and Courts
When it's summer in New York, the city is a sweltering concrete
and pegged-steel plain, and the people impressed there for the season
make motions only by their blind habits . . . the force of an ingrained
attitude of industrial precision which comes with the modern world.
It becomes a dull dislike and fear of defeat.
In July and August, the muck-waters of the East River or the
uncapped splash of the fire hydrant are the only time of awakening
for some. And the city is the hotbed of the Eastern seaboard for
basketball.
The place gets daily transfusions, thick with new names from
Boston, Philadelphia, Washington, Pittsburgh, Providence, and
the rest. Small town prep stars, college stars and soon-to-be stars,
some ofrthe pros-they pack the city looking for "the Boys" and
the courts.
They want competition. They want a ball game, a pick-up shot
with some guts to it. They live for the sweaty heat of playing with
"the Boys." Because it's here that they separate the MEN from the
hot-shots, the one-shot, the flat-foot, the dumper, and the others.
They call it "schoolyard" ball. Maybe because it's the only
schooling they have in common, the only school many are ready to
attend regularly.
It's a parched and dirty class which dotes on specifics, with
training in intricate maneuvers and technique. It's the closest
to the Job Corps, the closest to on-the-job training-that most
of them will ever get. To many of them high school is or was an
out-of-it place for little Lu-Lu's, the only draw having been the
organized ball it offered-maybe a chance for college, a big
scholarship, and a Cush life.
But the real juicer of the courts is the experience of a type of
perfection in the physical achievement of the game. You may get
your kicks from the glitter and the flash of some James Bond epic,
where the timing, the action, and even the music fuse into some
gleaming perfection ... vicarious thrills.
But for "the Boys" it's all right there, all for the work they have
to bleed into it-and all on a very first-hand basis-in the slick
moves, the bullet feed, and the finishing swich through cordless
rims of playground and "Y" courts around Lennox Avenue in Har-
lem, the Grand Concourse, Third Avenue, River Avenue, and even the
Avenue of the Americas where it dips deep in Manhattan to the
Washington Square area.

*4

!M

--

mr 7 s

TWO 'IVI' 4
By BOB McFARLAND
Registration for candidacy for the Special To The Daily
DETROIT - Wolverine George
Canamare, captain of the Mich-
igan cindermen, looked as if he
USNSA National Student Congress :adbnowthkerss
rod in his hand after his perfor-
mance in the NCAA Track Cham-
remain open until 5:00 Tuesday,hlesteray aftern-
The compactly-built senior re-
" turned to the form which had
M a ch 15.Ca dwdaths ma register nhis acclaim last season, only
rc andidmay one week after he had failed to
clear the bar at 14'4" at the Big
Ten indoor meet. Canamare, be-
ginning at 14'6", went over on
9P.his first attempt, and then cleared
" " *"*15' and 15'3" without a miss to
join six other collegians in quali-
1546 SAB } fying for the finals this afternoon
in the pole vault.
At the close of the first day of
competition, Kansas and Boston
College were tied for the team
lead, both squads having earned
I; ~~---~.~--- --.-.~~~ -- --. .,.------

Cindermen Advance

10

six points. Close behind the two
front-runners were Southern Illi-
nois University with 51/2 points,
and California State College and
Georgetown University, deadlock-
ed at five each.
Ward Qualifies
The only other Wolverine to
qualify for today's action was
Carl Ward, who managed to grab
a position in the 60-yard dash
semifinals. The Michigan speed-
ster will have a rough go though,
if he is to earn team points for
the Wolverines in the event.
Included in the 60-yard dash
field are Charlie Green of Ne-
braska and Sam Perry of Ford-
ham, co-holders of the world rec-
ord with times of :05.9, and Craig
Wallace of Kent State who has
logged a breathtaking :05.9 on a
dirt track.
Although he cut-loose a toss of
5713", Michigan's Jack Harvey
failed to qualify for the finals in
the shot put. George Woods of
Southern Illinois University un-
leased a heave of 61'34" to win,
the event.
Long Jump Mark Set
Only one record was set in the
opening action. Rainer Stenius, a
sandy-haired tan athlete from

California, illustrated what effect
outdoor workouts have on a per-
formance, as he leaped 25'7" in
the long jump to crack the old
mark of 25'1" set last year.
Many of the spectators at Cobo
came not to see competition for
the regular team championship,
but rather to see an exhibition
mile run, pitting the lanky dis-
tance whiz from Kansas, Jim
Ryun, against other top runners
from around the country.
Ryun did not break the four
minute barrier, but no one seemed
to care. He kept the crowd happy
by grabbing the lead at the out-
set, and holding it over the entire
11-lap distance.
4:03.3 MileI
The remainder of the field
pounded the hardwood boards
close behind Ryun until the start
of the ninth lap, when the red
and blue clad holder of the Ameri-
can record for the mile began to
sprint. And boy, did he sprint!
The kick that defeated Peter Snell
was in operation over the last
three laps at a rate which many
men wouldn't be able to maintain
over a quarter time. Ryun's time:
4:03.3.

WORSHIP

APRIL 1966
SGiRAIDUATION ANNOUNCI

ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL,
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litkd, Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY - Masses at 7:00,
. 8:00, 9:00, 11:30 a.m. and 12:00 and
5:00 p.m. Confessions following masses.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. - Evening Mass.
Confessions following.
SATURDAY-Confessions-3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated wth the Baptist General
Conference
Rev. Charles Johnson
SUNDAY SERVICES
9:45 a.m.-Sunday Bible School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship..
7:00 p.m.-Evening Gospel Hour,
An active University group meets each Sunday
for the 9:45 service.
Coffee is served at 9:30 a.m.

ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPSICOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Holy Communion with Sermon.
Breakfast following at Canterbury House.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer with Sermon.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer (Church). Special
Evening Music Program, St. Andrew's
Choir, "Missa Brevis."
TUESDAY
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore L. Scheidt, Asst. Pastor
SUNDAY
9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services with Holy
Communion. Sermon by Pastor Scheips,
"God's Answer for Loneliness."
6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran Student
organization. Meet at Lutheran Student
Center, Hill and Forest, as guest of N.L.C.
WEDNESDAY
10:00 p.m.-Midweek Lenten Service.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST
SCIENTIST
1833 Washtenaw Ave.
For transportation call 665-2149
9':30 a.m.--unday School for pupils from 9
to 20 years of age..
11:00 a.m.-Sunday morning church service.
Infant core during service.
11: 00.m.-Sunday School for pupils from 2
to 6 years of age.
A free reading room is maintained at 306 E.
Liberty. Open daily except Sundays and
holidays from 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.;
Monday evenings from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH &
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "What Jesus Thought About Man."
10:15 a.m.-Christian Social Concerns Class.
6:00 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room. Open to all
students.
7:00 p.m.-Program, Wesley Lounge. Panel
reporting on- MMSM Conference, "Silent
Inhabitants of an Intellectual Ghetto."
TUESDAY
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Tape and letters from medical
missionary couple from First Methodist
Church, now in Liberia. Dinner follows.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Supper
and program, Dr. David English: "Psychia-
try and Religion, Part II."
LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Henry 0. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 p.m.-Joint Meeting with Gamma Delta
at Center. Speaker: Prof. Rirhard Graef,
Wittenberg University, "Two Worlds of
the Theologians."
MONDAY & THURSDAY
7:00 p.m.-Class on Sex, Dating, Marriage
and the Family.
WEDNESDAY
7:15 a.m.-Matins.
7:15 p.m.-Vespers: Dr. Norman Menter,
Guest Preacher.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher
Pastors: Malefyt and Von Haven
9:15 a.m.-Collegiate Class.
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service. Sermon: "Work
and Human Worth: A New Look at an Old
Ideal," Prof. Timothy Smith.
7:00 p.m. - Evening Worship. Sermon:
"Church Merger: Ecumenicity," Dr. Brun-
stieng.
8:30 p.m-Collegiate Forum.

on sale
Mon., Mar. 14; Tues., Mar.
in

Fl

S

HBOW
AT MUSIC SCHI

also.'..

I1

lI

15; W(

I guess this is the only thing that really counts for them. It's
something they can feel success in, they can feel that they're
better than the rest-than the office worker, or the apartment
"super," of the neighborhood blue-nose, or even the high-balling
fat-cat in the cool glass office buildings up in some picture sky-
line a million miles away on Fifth or Park or Madison or Broad-
way. It is a nameless, brutally satisfying feeling of power. And yet
it is almost shorter-lived than a celluloid-and-dreams adventure.
There are few places like New
- _York in summer. Perhaps the
South Side of Chicago and parts
of Washington, D.C., come closest
to the phenomenon. It is, in many
respects, a type of "spring train-
ing" for college players and some
pros-the young ones-who "play"
down around Coney Island in
Brooklyn.
Now, New York streets are
nothing like the basketball haven
in the airy Catskill Mountains-
d M 16 Kutscher's Country Club-where
the stars are on a "summer scho-
larship," where a 6'7" bell-hop
or a 7'1" dishwasher are not un-
common, and where Red Auer-
bach's clinics in the long after-
noons are not for casual partici-
pants. But it is in the city that
you'll find the likes of Mel
Graham, Albie Grant, John Aus-
tin, Bill Melchionne, Jimmy Walk-
er, and "The Man"-Pablo Robert-
00L snbefore he got drafted and
shipped out.
As for most of "the Boys"
. . . you have never heard of
them, and you never wil. Of
some of them it can truly be
said that they loved the sport
not wisely but too well.
A lot of them had slipped into
the college ranks in spite of
grades because of the incredible
abilities they displayed in prep
ball ... many in the rich southern
schools that draft you right out
of the school Yard, pay you to
play, and then don't give a hang
if you come within a hundred
miles of the place the rest of the
week. But it usually didn't take
"the Boys" too long to flunk out
ur time. Opera- of even those universities which
d's most perfect could take them in the first place.
"The Boys" - some of them
hoods with limited horizons and
nts have done it. life expectancies, some of them
0 colleges in 50 less rebellious or born luckier-
have at least one chance for
t Match success in their lifetimes. And
peration they will play that rough, quick
"game" until they're drafted, or
ihat you're like jailed, or can find their sue-
0's memory file. cesses elsewhere. . . . But else-
the opposite sex where is a mighty big place. So
f five or more if it's not to be one of these,
he then they'll play it until they
just can't.
ephone numbers You night tsk-tsk or chuckle or
ooking for. Your cough whatever. You might look
rds: the matches at it this way:
It's the bal and the pave-
ment, the dirt, the pulsating
""m -*"-" """'m heat and the sweat-and hours
s of it-hours of it. That's what
to help stamp makes national tournaments at
Quick! auditoriums in Portland, Los
Angeles, Iowa City, Philadel-
phia, and New York what they
* are.
Zip Code U

1%

SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY
7:30 p.m.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for aIl
NO 2-2756.

MV

services-Call

ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Piper David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Closs-9:35 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of-month.
Nursery faculties during worship services and
church school.
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 & 512 E. Huron 663-9376
9:45 a.m.-Campus Classes, Baptist Campus
Center.
11:00 am.-Morning Worship, First Baptist
Church.

Five ideal dedlar
Join in the most adventurous experiment of o
tion Match. Let the IBM 7090 Computer (the worl
matchmaker) stamp out blind dates for you.
Two Harvard juniors started it. 100,000 studer
Now you and 3,400,000 college students in 150(
cities can sign up and join in!
Just send us the coupon. We'll send you the C
Quantitative Personality Projection Test pronto!
Then return the questionnaire with $3.00. W
and what you like will be translated into our 709
It will scan the qualifications of every member of
from this geographic area. Then it will select t
matches best for you.
You'll receive your names, addresses and tel(
within three weeks. You'll be what your date is 1
date will be what you are looking for. In other wo
will be mutual.
Dear IBM 7090,
I am 17 or over (and 27 or under) and I want'
out blind dates. So mail me my questionnaire
am School
u Address City State

xii

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Sts.
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor

NO 3-0589

9:45 a.m.-Sunda.y School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.rr.-Training Hour.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Nursery facilities at all services.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.
CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.-"John-
Our Contemporary," Rev. Terry N. Smith.
Church School-9:30 a.m.-Crib-6th grade.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Washtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00-12:45.
Bible Study for College Students at 10:30 a.m.

BETHLEHEM UNITED CHURCH
OF CHRIST
423 S. Fourth Ave.
Rev. E. R. Kloudt, Rev. A. C. ,Bizer, and

k

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