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March 10, 1966 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-10

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, MARCH 10,1900

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAY. MARCH 10. 1966

_.._. _ . , _e_, ,,. __, _....,.

I

FILMS
Experimental Films: Good, Bad
But Always, Always, Different

ART
Peterdi Shows Mastery of Print Making

r

HILLEL
SABBATH SERVICE

The type of film now being
shown in the present Ann Arbor
Film Festival is the future of the
movie medium. Some of the pic-
tures are awful, others pseudo-in-
tellectual, others damn good. But
they are a far cry from the lavish
gilt-on-gilt productions of Holly-
wood.
First Show
It is possible to get ahold of a
certain photographic technique
and work it so hard that it be-
comes a tiresome cliche in just a
few minutes. If you don't believe
it, try to see "Upright, L.A. Is
Burning" or "Yellow Horse," which
opened the Fourth Ann Arbor Film
Festival last night.
"Up-Tight" coughed up' its life
in a series of dizzying hand-held
camera shots and tricky color
montages. "Yellow Horse" belabor-
ed the odd notion of screening a
motorcycle race in slow motion.
These two fancies were preceded
by a perfectly earnest film on
Radio Free Europe which, while
at the other end of the scale from
its running mates, made equally
little impression.
Part the Second of the evening's
entertainment was titled "Flux-
films, Ann Arbor, Part I." These
seemed to line up with the auteur
films we read about in idle mo-
ments, like 'Sleep" and "Hair-
cut." The first short consisted en-
tirely of a screen-wide smile, while
the second was an extrme slow
motion film of a man exhaling
cigarette smoke. If these descrip-
tions sound' a bit ridiculous--so

is this whole movement in film-
making. Broadmindedness only
goes so far.
At this point, we could have
been shown an old Ma and Pa
Kettle movie and we'd all have
declared it exquisite camp, but in-
steal the program closed with
"(No) Peace in the Valley" by
the Prime Movers. The film show-
ed a lot of overexposed shots of
Ann Arbor (in color) together
with occasional abstract moving
patterns, like an oscilloscope on
LSD.
The sound track was provided
by the Prime Movers themselves
plus a prerecorded tape. The mu-
sic, even from the second row,'
was imaginative and continually
interesting.
I suspect that I enjoyed the im-
ages on the screen because they
were of a familiar place seen
from unfamiliar angles, but this is
not grudging praise: "(No) Place
in the Valley" was very enjoyable,
in sad contrast to the rest of the
lot.
-PETER BICKELMANN
* * .*
Second Show
"Penny Arcade" was the long-
est and most traditional film of
the nine o'clock series yesterday.
The technique of this film is not
so unusual as the others: there
are no elaborate plays with cam-
era movement or lighting. There
was even a definite plot line -
something that experimental film-
makers have been avoiding recent-
ly as "decadent" and "reaction-

ary." But the result is a moving
piece of cinema in contrast to the
coldness and vapidity of some of
the technical tours de force that
have been turned out under the
guise of "experiments."
The movie begins with a scene
of comic book mock-heroic: A
dark alley, an inocuous old gen-
tleman attacked by a punk from
the streets, is saved by a rather
pudgy superman-figure. As the
film progresses, we realize that it
is a comic strip, for the characters
speeches appear in the familiar
balloons of Dick Tracy and Com-
pany.
One of the other extremely good
films in this showing was a film
that almost was not shown be-
cause of technical difficulties:
"Relax Your Mind." It scarcely
lasts three minutes and consists
of a series of pictures and phrases
flashed on the screen to the ac-
companimerit of some nasal blues.'
If it had been longer, it might
have been boring, but instead it
is hilarious.
The last film "Eargogh" was
extremely interesting, if you're
interested in that sort of thing.
It was a very complicated por-
trayal of an incident in Van
Gogh's life (his cutting off his
ear) emeshed in brilliant color,
forests, sunflowers, Van Gogh
self portraits and some of the
standard paraphenalia of experi-
mental cinema. It is symptomatic
that many people walked out be-
fore the end.
-MARY BARKEY

By FRANCES HYNES
Gabor Peterdi attempts to make
monumental prints, and succeeds
beautifully. His works are on dis-
play at the Forsythe Gallery until
March 17.
Born in Budapest, Hungary, in
1915. Peterdi has received awards
for his prints all over the world.
Starting with the Prix de Rome in
1930, he went on to win the
Boston Arts Festival Graphics
Prize in 1957, a Ford Foundation
Grant in 1960, a Guggenheim
Fellowship in 1964 and '65, and
a prize in the Tokyo Graphic In-
ternational Museum of Western
Art.
With such a display of awards,
one would look forward to some
truly excellent works. And no one
will be disappointed.
Peterdi achieves subtle and
beautiful color, fascinating tex-
ture, and monumental polygonal
shapes. He is one of the few print
makers whom this writer knows
who can be called monumental,
without fear of disagreement.
The technique which Peterdi
uses for his monoprints and etch-
Study in
Guadalajara, Mexico
The Guadalajara Summer School,
a fully accredited University of
Arizona program, conducted in
cooperation with professors from
Stanford University, University of
California, and Guadalajara, will
offer June 27 to August 8, art,
folklore, geography, history, lan-
guage and literature courses. Tui-
tion, board and room is $265.
Write Prof. Juan B. Rael, P.O. Box
7227, Stanford, Calif.

ings is this: the plate is etched,
and then frequently flat objects,
such as a piece of cheesecloth or
a bamboo mat are placed on the
plate. The plate is then inked and
applied to the paper and both the
object and the plate show up in
the product. This is how Peterdi
Obtains some of his intriguing
textures. In other etchings, the
texture is the result of the way
the plate itself is etched.
Peterdi's shapes are large and
frequently polygonal, that is, using
only straight lines. Often they are
outlined in a different color. This

makes the shapes stand out from
their background. Sometimes these
backgrounds look like Arctic land-
scapes and sometimes they are
,more like the "nothingness" of
surrealist settings. Most of the
works have landscape titles, many
related to the Arctic.
Peterdi uses background colors
of cool blues, greens and greys
which one would expect to find in
an arctic wasteland. But his flat.
polygonal, textured shapes, which
usually are not part of the land-
See PETERDI, Page 8'

TOMORROW
Friday, March 1 1 at
7:15 P.M. promptly
Guest Speaker
RABBI JACOB E. SEGAL
Cong. Adas Shalom, Detroit
"The Jew in America: Retrospect and Challenge"
John Planer, Cantor
The Hillel Choir, Mike Robbins, Director
Joan Temkin, Organist
B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street All Are Welcome

i _

I

1

Presented by The Cinema Guild and
Dramatic Arts Center in cooperation
with Cinema II and Challenge Lecture
Series in the ARCHITECTURE AND DESIGN
AUDITORIUM.
TONIGHT and Friday
Each program is different!
Saturday:
IN PERSON
UP-TIGHT with ANDY WARHOL
and the VELVET UNDERGROUND
Films by Andy Warhol
VINYL with Gerard Malanga
LUPE with Edie Sedgwick
ROCK 'N ROLL by the Velvet Underground
Performances scheduled at 7:00 and 9:00
Sunday:
Announcement and replays of
Award-Winning Films and Film
Highlights
Screenings at 7:00, 9:00 and i1:00
Single Admission 75c

hr
F
V

Across
Campus
THURSDAY, MARCH 10
2:15 p.m. - John A. Stark-
weather will hold a seminar on
"Computer-Assisted Interviewing
and Testing" at 1057 MHRI.
7 ands9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Travel Club will
sponsor the film "Return to Erin"
in Aud. A.'
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a String Orchestra
Concert with John Farrer con-
ducting in the Recital Hall, School
of Music.
8:30 p.m.-The student string
orchestra, conducted by John Far-
rer, a student in the School of
Music, will present a concert in
the music school Recital Hall. Fea-
tured will be a premiere work,
"Three Pieces for Strings," by Jer-
ry Dilik, a member of the Michi-
gan Band.
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
4:15 p.m.-The Psychology De-
partment will present Dr. Leonard
Berkowitz of the Univertisy of
Wisconsin in a colloquium on
"Some Experiments on Automa-
tism and Intent in Human Ag-
gression" ,in Aud. B.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.

4

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Shown at 7:00-3:00
5:00-7:00 and 9:05

Hear

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BUZ
BARC LAY
singing all-his Hits:
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Don't come alone
unless you're not
with anybody
FRIDAY
G 103 S.Q.-75c

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,. MIHIGAN

"It's great to see a spy movie
as realistic and believable!"
-New York Times

Academy Award Nomination-Best Actor
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CLAIRE BLOOM
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As

WINNER

1111illimomm

-- - ------------
-----------
---------------------------

ACADEMY
AWARD
NOMINATIONS!

Best Picture!
Best Actress!
Best Director!
Best Screenplay!
Best Costume
Design

I

C eatie t4Pt le4tiOaI
presents
THE NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS

/4
.4

10

.m

GOOD
SEATS
STILL
AVAILABLE

BLOCK TICKET ORDERS
May be picked up
at Hill Box Office

LAURENCEIARVEYDIRKBOGARDE
1111 (u'IIDToTIU

FRIDAY, MARCH 11

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