100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

January 06, 1966 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-01-06

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

M SDR~Av JANU AT~~

iyf on

PAGE TWO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

iaa a4 al11 Otlr !'ll 1 , JI

ib

Bookery Offers Discounts'
On Texts for 97 Courses

29 APPEAL:
Await Sit-In Trials

' Thunderball,' 'Tenth Vietim't

Satisfy Hunger for Violence

i
j
i

By GAIL JORGENSEN Miss Jackson went on to say
"The student saves about 10 that the Bookery bought used
he'entudhent shes andostl1s texts;for up to 55 per cent of the
per cent when he buys and sells original value, while most local
his books at the Bookery," ac- merchants never pay more than
cording to Jennifer Jackson, '67Ed, 50 per cent. Moreover, the Bookery
a member of the Student Govern- charges only 66-51 per cent of the
mentdCouncil's Student Exchange original value when it sells the
Board. books, while the local merchants
The Bookery, a student-operated charge 75-65 per cent.
book exchange, opened Monday The Bookery is unrelated to the
morning, and will be in operation Committee on a University Book-
from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day store which petitioned last fall
this week until Saturday in rooms for a year-round University-run
3R and 3S of the Union. bookstore. Miss Jackson felt, how-

"The Bookery carries used text-
books for about 97 University
courses, as well as selling supplies
at a discount and some books on
a consignment basis," Miss Jack-
son explained. In two and a half
days before vacation, $7200 worth
of textbooks were purchased from
students by the Bookery.
"The response was terrific," shej
said. "We only wish we'd had moreI
money so we could have bought
books for more courses."

ever, that support shown for the
Bookery could help chances for
a University-run bookstore.
"This is the most material way
the Regents can see the desire of
the students for a discount book-
store supported by the University,"
she said.
The committee has been organ-
izing the Bookery since July. Mi-
chael Dean, '67, is chairman, aided
by Miss Jackson and Rick Schan-
hals, '67E.
James Gorby, grad, is finance

Find Fame, Fortune
On The Daily Staff

manager of the Bookery, and
Carol Pintek, '68, is personnel
manager. The Bookery is super-
vised by Mrs. J. E. Fernley of
Ann Arbor.
"In the past, different forms
of a Student Book Exchange have
existed sporadically," Dean said.
"Our present plan represents a
reconstruction and revitalization
of former policies in such a way
as to provide a more complete
service for the student."
In the past SBX services were
operated by the Union, SGC and
NSA; and they were often un-
successful. Last spring a motion
was introduced for a Board of
Directors to try to remedy pre-
vious errors; and the idea of the
Bookery evolved from that.
Dean explained that previous
SBX's tried to cover too broad
a range of courses; hence the
Bookery limited their handling to
97 courses.
He also said that the SBX had
sold only on consignment, re-
quiring students to take back their
unsold books. Now the student
is assured of selling his texts if
they correspond to the course
listing.
The Bookery received $2000 of
their necessary capital from the
account of the last SBX, $4500
from SGC and $1500 in the form
of a loan from the Office of Stu-
dent Affairs, Dean said. He ex-
pects to just break even.
The Office of Student Affairs
has kept in touch with the com-
mittee as it developed its plans
for the Bookery. John C. Feld-
kamp, assistant to the vice-presi-
dent for student affairs, said the
Bookery was "a definite student
service."
Feldkamp also said that the
Bookery has kept in line with the
1929 Regents ruling prohibiting
the University from competing
with local merchants, as had the
previous SBX.
Contrary to a current rumor,
he added, this Regents ruling is
legal and has the same effect as
a by law. It was reaffirmed in
1959.
Feldkamp washnot sure whether
the success of the Bookery would
increase the possibility of getting
a University-run bookstore. He
felt the Bookery is a good begin-
ning alternative and expressed
the hope that it could be expanded
to meet more student needs.
"The Bookery just skimmed the
cream," he explained, "by buying
only the more widely-used text-
books which involve less risk."

(Continued from Page 1)
American Civil Liberties Union,
the attorney for the other 29, said
he would file a brief this week
presenting their case.
The reclassifications began Oct.
27, when Col. Arthur A. Holmes,
director of the State Selective
Service System, announced an
"evaluation" of an Oct. 15 sit-in.
He said the protest violated the
Universal Military Training and
Service Act-he charged it hinder-
ed the Selective Service System's
regular office procedure - and
hence the students, having broken
the system's rules, were liable to
reclassification. The decision to
change students' draft status de-
pended on their local boards;
Holmes, under the suggestion of
Gen. Louis B. Hershey, director of
the National Selective Service
System, wrote to the students'
draft boards suggesting a review
of the students' status. On Nov.
19 the first student was reclassi-
fied.
Controversy immediately began
to whirl around the move of Her-
shey and Holmes. On Dec. 23, Sen.
Philip A. Hart (D-Mich) requested
Attorney General Nicholas Katz-
enbach to prepare an opinion
about whether "until a charge is
made. . and judgment reached,
. . . these men are presumed to
be innocent of trespass impending
the Selective Service law."
A high administration source in
Washington further reported yes-
terday that the administration is
"extremely concerned" about Gen.
Hershey's actions, since he is put-
ting the administration in a "very
bad light" and could furnish
court test cases which could in-
validate parts of the draft law.
The reports said there are fears
that Congress might hastily enact
bad proviisons to replace invalid
regulations.
After an appeal before the State
Board, the next step for the pro-
testors would be an appeal before
the President, or a commission to
which the President is likely to
delegate the final power.
Besides the regular appeal pro-
cedure, however, the ACLU is con-

sidering other alternatives. One,
explained Klein, is to ask for an By HUGH HOLLAND is an anarchist's dream of "action Violence is denied as it is used,
injunction against Holm es, Her-up n ato wih u an di e - B d r ws h o gh he o t
shey and the local boards to end There are two ways to meet the upon action without any direc- BOnd rows through the ost
further reclassification. Another problems of the animal hungers tion." laughtble and gruesome under-
alternative is to take the selective in man: one is to deny them, sub- Quality Retained water duel in aquatic history,
system to federal-court because it due them, re-channel them sub- TheTenth Victim," on the speariig men through their face-
sysem o fderl'curtbecuseitduethe, r-chnne thm sb-other hand (if you manage to masks, ripping off air hoses anti
denied the rights of counsel and consciously; the other is to meet over he syu tace explodngtrapped men into bits.
of a court record to the students. them ,admit them, reorganize their overlook the syrupy, tacked-on all n tnape mency.
effects conclusion), meets the same de- all in te name of Decency.
Klein declined to list other al- Two movies presently showing: mands for excitement without re- 'He is the American Ideal, the
ternatives, but he said the ACLU in Ann Arbor deal specifically linquishing the demands of taste Hero wio can hit harder and kill
was considering others which he ihAnnAbofrtheealngecfihallyfand quality. more, a: well as inludging in all
termed "adventurous." with one of these hungers, that ofan
Otherse whodve s takeViolence, and the solutions they From a rather sardonic tale by the othc social taboos to excess
Others who have taken stands represent are both revealing and Robert Sheckley, the Italian di- (,Guttoxy, :-Fornication, Vanity,
against the reclassification in- upsetting, rector Petri has fashioned a chill- etc.h Yt, he is vindicated be-
Hatcher and vice-Presidents rh- "Thunderball," the latest in the ing view of a Future with viol- cause he -represents the Right
ard Cutler and Allen Smith; The James Bond epics to materialize is ence channeled, and murder made -
New York Times; The Washing- the busiest, gaudiest, most gim- legal. Unlike "Thunderball," the "The-- Tenth Victim," however,
ton Post; The National Observer; micky effort yet, From the pseudo- theme is always adhered to and never capitalizes on violence as a
The Wall Street Journal; and The Busby Berkley nudes during titles in direct opposition to the Bond draw as "Thunderball" does.
Detroit Free Press. to a miserable parody of the clas- epic, gimmicks are subservient to Thrematicaly there is no excuse of
This disagreement was met, of sic "Black Orpheus" Chase scene, the plot. the l "a jistifying the means."
course, with support for Hershey "Thunderball" is a hodge-podge "The Tenth Victim," although a Marcello Mstrionni hunts and
in many circles, collection of every movie you've bit drawn out, is an excellent ex- kills beoausehe is a human being
"Draft deferments," the Detroit ever seen. ample of how a film can both ex- , and he likes o hunt and kill.
News said, "are commitments to Not Satisfying ploit an audience's need for viol- What a plesure if James Bond
pursue on the home front jobs The result is diverting and en-. ence and comment on it. "The would have turned around after
essential to the national well be- tertaining to a degree, but not at Tenth Victim" never insults its mutilating the Spectre head dis-
ing. If those commitments are all satisfying. Exhibition is sub- audience by appealing to its basic guised' as a -wonan and had said
broken, if those deferred impede stituted for excitement, frenzy for animal desires for their satisfac- honestly, "I allays did want to
the orderly war effort, where in feeling, movement for meaning. tion alone, belt a widow."
the name of patience are the The film is sloppy in both writ- Honesty
reasons for draft deferment?" ing and execution. Honesty is a key word to both t L C
Instead of carefully developed the films. "Thunderball" is an
pace and tautly constructed dra- honest expression of the hypocrisy r f { ,
matic movement, "Thunderball" existent in American filmmaking.
Baxter Dies-
Professor of Forestry Dow V.
Baxter died Dec. 31st while onaj
trip to Tucson, Arizona.
Prof. Baxter, who was 67, was
a wwl kns f

I

I

By JAMES SCHUTZE
You have aplace waiting for
you on the'Daily staff. It doesn't
matter who you are. The Daily
doesn't' care if you'rea liar, a
thief,, a sot, an imbecile, a psy-
chotic, a hustler, a cheater, a
gambler, a rustler, a . .., or a .
The Daily likes you just the way
you are.
And you'll like the Daily. Every-
one likes the Daily. Everyone,
except and ,who
are going to sue for libel if their
names ever appear in the Daily
again.
In fact, there's a lot you can
do on the Daily. You can write,
sell, edit, organize, photograph,
interview, summarize, theorize,
:spy, tell jokes and wear a lamp-
shade for a hat, throw pencils, or
grow a plant.
Judy Fields, a kind compas-j
sionate person, is personnel direc-
tor for the Daily. Judy Fields will
take you firmly in hand when you
first join the staff. She will tell
you that the Daily has annual
revenues of $200,000, student pay-
rolls of $17,000, a circulation of
25,000, alumni like Arthur Miller
and Thomas Dewey, a reputation
as the New York Times of the
college press, top ratings from the
Overseas Press Clubs and the Na-
tional Student Press Association,
a recent award for being the best
college newspaper from the Con-
ference of District Councils, and
Cchutze. And that's all true.
Judy Fields, a good person, will
show you how to write headlines.
You'll like Judy Fields. In fact,
Judy Fields, a considerate friend,
is going to hold mass recruiting
meetings for you next Monday
and Tuesday at 4:15. You'll like
her meetings. They're fun.
Once you have established your-
self as a full-fledged Daily staf-,

a wii iiwn memoer of the,
faculty of the Natural Resources
department since 1926. He was
buried yesterday in Hillsboro,
Illinois. A memorial service in Ann
Arbor has been scheduled for 3
p.m. tomorrow in the First Metho-
dist Church Chapel. Friends are
asked to not send flowers.

TO THE

ICGHIGAN DAILY

I

®

NOW

Read and
Use Daily
Classified
Ads

Judy Fields ,a kind compassion-
ate, is personnel director for The
Daily. Judy Fields will take you
firmly in hand when you join
the staff.
fer, fame and renown ,will be
yours. Mother will read everything
you write. Your draft board will
read everything you write. Presi-
dent Hatcher will have someone
read him everything you write.
After a while, you will be dis-
owned, sued, expelled, and drafted.
But you'll laugh.
Perhaps that is the Daily's true
charm. Working for the Daily
teaches you how to sit quietly at
a desk and just sort of giggle to
yourself about classes, exams,
degrees and life. Daily staffers
are happy people. They don't
worry a lot, join the Daily staff,
and chuckle your life away.

-

DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

E E
I A
E U
1 E
E E
E E
Tonight and Tomorrow at 7 and 9
I
1 E
MAE WEST and CARY GRANT in
IRI'M NO ANGEL
Mae with a shady past rand
I 1
*a briht future.1
1 E
E E
A :
SHORT: NEVER WEAKEN:
aE
HAROLD LLOYD
E 1
inca skyscraper classic.
I E
1 1
I E
r E
IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUIORU
# ADMISSION: FIFTY CENTS
'" E
rmmmmmrr rrmmmmr u rr rrrmmmmu mmm ummi.

NEXT ATTRACTION
"THOSE MAGNIFICENT MEN IN
THEIR FLYING MACHINES"
University of Michigan
Gilbert.& Sullivan Society
announces
-M-ASS MEETING
for the production of
RUDDIGORE

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
sity of Michigan, for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
i~l ncrnimchil~v vn~iAC hnild hb

Forest Ave.
General Notices

UNION BALLROOM

la14responsbil~it1y.NotiessnouldeU jThe Michigan Memorial-Phoenix Proj-
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to ect invites requests for faculty research
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be grants to support research within the
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday scope of the term "peaceful uses of
for Saturday and Sunday. General 1nuclear energy." The Project is par-
Notices may be published a maxi- ticularly interested in studies concerned
mumNof twotiye pisreqestDayx- with: Biological Effects of Radiation,
mum of two times on request; Day Radiation Dosimetry, New Uses of Iso-
Calendargani at notices are nl topes, New Tracer Techniques, Direct
Sctdtorgauiation.tcs r o Conversion of Nuclear Energy to Elec-
accepted for publication. trical Energy, The Fusion Process, Plas-
THURDAYJANURY 6mas as Related to Controlled Fusion,
THURSDAY, JANUARY 6 Radiation Chemistry, Nuclear Weapons
Proliferation and Disarmament, Psy-
Day Calendar chological Attitudes Toward Nuclear
I Energy Hazards, Evaluation of Hazards
Mental Health Research Institute to Urban Populations from Nuclear
Seminars-Dr. Bernard Agranoff will Activities, and Economic Studies of
speak on "Memory in the Goldfish," Nuclear Activities Including Power Pro-
Thurs., 2:15 p.m., 1057 MHRI, 205 N. (Continued on Page 6)
3RD BIG WEEK!
NU?! rn'./1 J 9AOUT!

Sunday, Jan. 9, 7:30 p.m.

ALL WELCOME

i -

THE ENGINEERING COUNCIL and
VULCANS HONORARY PROUDLY PRESENT

'

I

I M m

The Brilliant Sound of
ztAN Gr.E'TZ

HERE COMESTHE BIGGEST BOND OF ALL'
MtEOT D00001 am DD=rU ~i mueasaaenaae

I

in Concert at Hill Auditorium

JOSEPH E. LEVINE presents
MARCELLO MASTROIANNI CARLO
PRSULA ANDRESS rONTI

Jan. 15,

1

966

8:30 P.M.

I

-r_1 .I -

&f)~ 7C M f) C d"*~7 7

E

I

I

I

I11I(/VtrktS 'hiI' iN? 1J .%171

Back to Top

© 2017 Regents of the University of Michigan