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March 08, 1966 - Image 2

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-03-08

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, MARCH S. 1966

PAE W T E'I _A AIYTUSAY AR._ ~

.s L:+uNi~ .a, fiaiaaV Val V, ai7VV

MUSIC
Serkin: Sparked with Busoni;
Dynamic Throuoh Beethoven

Across Campus

By JEFFREY.K. CHASE
Program
Schubert-Sonata in A major
(Op. posth.)
Busoni-Toccata: Preludio;
Fantasia, Ciacona
Busoni-Berceuse
Beethoven-Sonata in C
minor,'IOp. III
"I don't like my music intellec-
tual," exclaimed one lady after
the Rudolf Serkin concert in Hill
Aud. last evening. "I just like to
be lulled by sweet, emotional
sounds."
This lady, unfortunately, must
have been disappointed with Mr.
Serkin's playing, because he cer-
tainly does not dwell on tonal
caress. Rather, he aims to drive
the notes to reveal their place in
the meaning of the music, which,
after all, is an intellectual matter
of recreating its form through its
content of harmony, rhythm, tex-

ture, color, and melody. And with
Mr. Serkin especially, the playing
is so intense that each note is
attacked with a defining bite.
With the Schubert sonata Serk-
in was not at his best: the play-
ing, particularly in the first move-
ment, was too ponderous and un-
comfortable, and the overall grace
of the Schubertian line suffered
from an absence of cantabile play-
ing. The climactic portions in the
second movement afforded the
best moments here.
Not until the Fantasia section
of the Toccata did the fire of the
man show through to spark the
music. The Busoni works, per-
formed in commemoration of the
100th anniversary of their com-
poser's birth, are not great music,
but certainly make for pleasant
listening. The contrasting moods
of the impetuous Toccata and lul-
laby-like Berceuse showed good
programming. During the Toccata,

needed to get in all the notes; in
the Berceuse, Serkin achieved a
lovely effect by holding down for
long stretches the sustaining pedal
to suggest an atmosphere of
ethereal repose.
Because Serkin has somehow
been labeled a foremost interpre-
ter of Beethoven's music, those
who sat through the more unfa-
miliar Schubert and Busoni works
with strained tolerance perked up
their ears to hear what the pianist
had to say in the Op. 111. Making
the most of sudden dynamic con-
trasts, of staccato vs legato at-
tacks, and imbuing the music with
rhythmic drive, Serkin said a lot.
The loud, full, percussive chords,
which had little place in the Schu-
bert, and the singing, cantabile
playing, which was missed in the
Schubert, both found their proper
perspective in the Beethoven son-
ata. Serkin again revealed his af-
finity for the music of that com-

TUESDAY, MARCH 8
4:00 p.m.-Jurij Borys of the
Department of Political Science
at the University of Stockholm,
Sweden, will speak on "Changes
in the Composition of the Soviet
Political Elite" at 200 Lane Hall.
4 p.m.-Jerome Badanes. poet
and an associate of the Free Uni-
versity, will read contemporary
poetry and discuss its social im-
plications in the Multipurpose Rm.
of the UGLI. Voice political party
is sponsoring the reading and
discussion.
WEDNESDAY, MARCH 9
4:15 p.m.-The Department of
Psychology will present Dr. Jacques
Lacan of the Sorbonne in Paris
during a colloquium on "Psycho-
analysis and Language," held in
Aud. C.
THURSDAY, MARCH 10
2:15 p.m. - John A. Stark-
weather will hold a seminar on
"Computer-Assisted Interviewing
and Testing" at 1057 MHRI.
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
8:00 p.m.-The Travel Club will
sponsor the film "Return to Erin"
in Aud. A.
8:30 p.m.-The School of Music
will present a String Orchestra
Concert with John Farrer con-
ducting in the Recital Hall, School
of Music.
FRIDAY, MARCH 11
4:15 p.m.-The Psychology De-
partment will present Dr. Leonard
Berkowitz of the Univertisy of
Wisconsin in a colloquium on
"Some Experiments on Automa-
tism and Intent in Human Ag-
gression" in Aud. B.
THIS FILM
WIL L SHOCK
YOU,3 YES...
You have never seen a motion
picture that so boldly explores the
compulsions of sexual hunger...
a story told with slashing
honesty and realism.

7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
10:00 p.m.-The State Cham-
pionship Debates will be held at
Rackham Lecture Hall.
SATURDAY. MARCH 1Z
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.
7 and 9 p.m.-Cinema II will
present the film "David and Lisa"
in Aud. A.
SUNDAY, MARCH 13
7 and 9 p.m.-The Ann Arbor
Film Festival will be held in the
Architecture Aud.

ORGANIZATION
NOTICES
USE OF THIS COLUMN FOR AN-
NOUNCEMENTS is available to official-
iy recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in Room 1011 SAB.
Cinema II, March 12, "David and
Lisa," 7 and 9 p.m., Aud. A.
Cercle Francais, Mardi, le 8 mars,
8 p.m., conference de Prof. R. Morgan:
"L'Afrikue Francho-phone," 3091 Frieze
Bldg. Venez tous.
Guild House, Tues. evening date hour,
refreshments, 9-10:30 p.m., 802 Monroe.

FOUR HEADS ARE
BETTER THAN ONE
STAN KEMP JOHN O'REILLY
WALLY GABLER BOB WALSH
Bring you Ann Arbor's most complete,
on-the-spot, coverage
of all U of M home basketball games
WCBN-650
Now serving University Towers

U

CREATIVE ARTS FESTIVAL PRESENTS

THE NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS

one was impressed with the speed I poser.

TNAILYOFFICIAL BULLETIN r
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40

The Daily Official Bulletin is an
official publication of the Univer-
.sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan Daily assumes no editor-
ial responsibility. Notices should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519 Administration Bldg. be-
fore 2 p.m. of the day preceding
publication, and by 2 p.m. Friday
for Saturday and Sunday. General
Notices may be published a maxi-
mum of two times on request; Day r
Calendar items appear once only.
Student organization notices are not
accepted for publication,.
TUESDAY, MARCH S
Day Calendar
Bureau of Industrial Relations Sem-
inar-"How to Tain Job Instructors":
Michigan Union, 8:30 a.m.
Community College Counselor-Student
Conference - Registration, Rackham
Bldg., 8:30 a.m.
. Management Development Seminar-
"Management Orientation": Kresge
Medical.Research Bldg., 1:30 p.m..
Center for Russian Studies Lecture-
Jurij Borys, Dept. of Political Science,
University of Stockholm, Sweden;
"Changes in the Composition of the
Soviet Political Elite": 200 Lane Hall,
4 p.m.
Symposium on Japanese Kabuki: Lec-
ture-Donald Shively, Harvard Univer-
sity, "The Social aMtrix of Kabuki":

Aud. A, Angell Hall, 4:15 p.m.
School of Music Degree Recital -
Robert Streckfuss, euphonium: Recital
Hall, School of Music, 8:30 p.m.
Symposium on Japanese Kabuki:
Films and Commentary-James Bran-
don, Michigan State University: Aud.
A, Angell Hall, 8:30 p.m.
General Notices
Dept. of Classical Studies Lecture:
Prof. Clark Hopkins, "The U. of M.
Excavations at Appolinia, 1965," Thurs.,
March 10, 4:10 p.m., Aud. B, Angell
Hall.
Fulbright-Hays Lectureships are still
available for 1966-67. The list may be
consulted in the Graduate' Fellowship
Office, Room 110 Rackham Bldg. The
list includes new positions in Afghan-
istan (medical science), Ceylon (social
work, English language teaching), Fin-
land (geography), Hong Kong (Ameri-
can literature, English language teach-
ing), and India (American literature
and history, economics, sociology, poli-
tical science). Faculty members wishing
announcements of Fulbright - Hays
awards for lecturing and research
abroad during 1967-68 are advised to
request them now from the Conference
Board of Associated Research Councils,
2101 Constitution Ave., N.W., Washing-
ton, D.C., 20418.
Graduate Record Examinations: Ap-
plication blanks are available in Rm.
122 Rackham Bldg. for the Graduate
Record Examination. The next admin-

istration of the test will be on Sat.
April 23, and applications must be re-
ceived in Princeton, N.J., by April 8.
French and German Objective Tests:
Objective tests in French and German
administered by the Graduate School
for doctoral candidates are scheduled
for Tues. evening, April 5, from 7 to
9 p.m, in the Rackham Lecture Hall.
ALL students planning to take one of
the objective tests must register by
April 4 at the Reception Desk of the
Graduate School Office, Rackham Bldg.
For further information call the Re-
ception Desk, Office. of the Graduate
School, 764-4402.
Doctoral Examination for Peter Paul
Pratt, Anthropology; thesis:."Archaeol-
ogy of the Oneida Iroquois as Related
to Early Acculturation and to the Lo-
cation of the Champlain-Iroquois Battle
of 1615." Chairman, J. E. Fitting.
Doctoral Examination for Rosalind
Selma Fisher Labow, Biological Chem-
istry; thesis: "Crystalline D-Serine De-
hydrase from Escherichia coll," Tues.,
(Continued on Page 10)
COUNSELORS
WANTED
NON-PROFIT
ORGANIZATIONAL CO-ED
CHILDREN and TEENAGE
CAMP in WAYNE
COUNTY, PENNA.
Several openings for experienced
supervisors and counselors skill-
ed in sports, archery, tennis,
swimming, nature, music and
photography;
also
Specialists to work with new
Teenage work and performing
arts camp - in music (orchestra
a choral work), drama, film-mak-
ing, carpentry and construction.
Ethel Abrams, Exec. Dir.
Interviewing on Friday,
March 11
From 1 :00 to 5:00 P.M.
at Summer Placement Office

FRIDAY, MARCH 11 ALL BLOCK REQUESTS are filled
and available at Hill Box Office.

HILL AUDITORIUM
8:30 P.M.

'I

Also GENERAL SALES 10-12, 1-4

2.50

2:25

2.00

CINEMA II
preents
KEIR DULLEA-JANET MARGOLIN
DAVID and LISA
Saturday and Sunday, 7 and 9:05 P.M.
March 12 &13 Aud. A, Angell Hall

starring Robert Howay
Angela Gann . Carol Pastinsky
Produced and directed by
Laurence L. Kent
A JOSEPK DRENNER ASSOCIATES RELEASE
caressed
ENDS WEDNESDAY
7Iw1t U1

11

i

L..

....M.-i

presents
0
a trip to F-isher Thneater in Detroit
to see that razzle dazzle musical
YGI
0
o si nU up, canVMarchI8 at the UAC center
in the Union 2-5 P.M.
0 $7.50 round trip includes ticket and transportation.
Money must be paid at time of sign-up
0W

$4-

1 lllllj

"It's great to see a spy movie
as realistic and believable!"
-New York Times

I

Academy Award Nomination-Best Actor
.PARAMONT PICTURES prrnts
RICHARD BURTN
OSKAR vE{NER
r
"THE ..,
WNO AME IN
FROMTHE CLD"G
A MARTIN RuTT PRODUCTION
.-,......,:"::^'v ...;. .:: . :r ... .. "...*. ire;... . . .}}

4
*

i

UNIVERSITY PLAYERS, Department of Speech
presents
The Opera Department, School of Music
inN
.R AL DA

FRIDAY, MARCH 18

HILL AUDITORIUM

4

Michigan Fraternities and Sororities present
"AN EVENING OF SONG"

I IF

r I

SIN

J,

0~

III

The Max Reinhardt version of

Johann Strauss

' DIE FLEDERMAUS
with
as Gabriel von Eisenstein

RALPH HERBERT,

;;:

I

JOSEF BLATT, as Conductor

Competing for Top Honors will be
Delta Upsilon and Alpha Phi Sigma Phi and Alp
Beta Theta Pi and Alpha Delta Pi Alpha Phi Alpha and All
Theta Xi and Delta Gamma Sigma Alpha Mu 4

ha Xi Delta
pha Kappa Alpha
and Sorosis

i;ii

Wednesday thru Saturday,*March 16-19

Oi

iir :

11111111 .

11 "

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