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February 27, 1966 - Image 6

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-27

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PAGE STX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY. FEBRUARY 27, 2966

..ESXTEMCIGNDIYSNA, ERAY2,16
11

Five
Wolverine Five Led
By Clawson, Russell

Romps;

State

Wins

MICHIGAN MEN FN FU!TPE
HAVE IT MADE--
WHEN THEY BUY, RENT OR LEASE
A CAR IN EUROPE FROM CTE
Write-Phone for Free Car Guide Low Rote Student Plan
CAR-TOURS IN EUROPE, Inc.
555 Fifth Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10017 " PL 1-3550
Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112, Ann Arbor
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

.y .,
<
'

Gophers, Hawkeyes
Also Score Victories
By The Associated Press The Wildcats broke a 34-34
EAST LANSING - Runner-up halftime tie and took the lead to
Michigan State stayed on Mich-Istay ahead in the second half as

(Continued from Page 1)
out, Strack replied, "We decided
to send Myers down to the base-
line on our zone offense, and he
certainly responded well from
there." Myers put through two
short Jumpers after being placed
at the baseline.
Strack pointed out Dennis Ban-
key for doing a "fine" job during
the span in which he guarded
Schellhase man-to-man. Schell-
hase felt that "the zone gave me
the most trouble though."
The lead changed hands exactly
once during the game. With 17:12
to go in the first half, the Wol-
verines took over 9-8, after trail-
ing 8-3. They went on to make it
MICHIGAN

13-8 before Ebershoff broke the
skein.
Purdue cut it briefly to 15-
14 but Michigan built it back up
to 21-14 and never were up by
less than five until the second
half rally.
Ebershoff led the Boilermakers
in the first half with 19 points,
but was held to six in the last
20 minutes, for a total 23. Russell
had 20 by the intermission.
Coach King was called for a
technical foul late in the half,
but Russell missed the free throw.
King's complaint involved a one-
and-one foul situation, which he
thought merited two shots. Ap-
parently his negativism included a
bit too much of his natural south-
ern vernacular.
PURDUE

Clawson
Darden
Myers
Russell
Thompson
Dill
Bankey
Brown
Pitts
Deizer
Tillotson
Totals

G F R P T
11-17 8-9 8 4 30
7-12 1-3 8 4 15
6-13 0-0 10 1 12
13-17 7-9 8 1 33
0-i 0-0 0 0 0
2-3 0-0 1 1 4
2-3 5-6 3 1 9
0-1 0-0 1 0 0
0-1 0-0s 0 1 0
1-1,0-0 0 o 2
0-1 0-0 1 0 0
42-70 21-27 40 13 105

Jameson
Schellhase
Grams
Ebershoff
Brady
O'Neill
Trudeau
Johnson
SaaI
Totals
MICHIGAN
PURDUE

G F R
2-6 0-0 3
16-30 5-6 7
4-10 0-0 11
9-22 5-5 3
1-7 2-2 6
0-2 0-0 1
3-5 1-1 3
1-2 0-1 0
0-0 0-1 0
36-84 13-16 34

P T
3 4
3 37
2 8
4 23
3 4
1 ,0
2 7
22
0 0
20985

z

i I

50 55-105
40 45- 85 I

MICHIGAN'S JIM MYERS grabs the ball after a wild scramble
with Purdue's Doug Trudeau. Other Wolverine players involved in
the action are John Clawson (center), and Oliver Darden.

BIG TEN NEXT:
Cindermen Ground Hoosiers

JBy JOHN SUTKUS
Michigan's trackmen prepped
for next weekend's Big Ten indoor
championships as they literally.
ran Indiana into the ground yes-
terday by a score of 101%2-31%/.
The Wolverine thinclads grab-
bed 11 of 15 firsts and 12 seconds
to completely dominate the dual
meet.
Bob Densham led a sweep of the
lopg Jump with a leap of 21'4/4".
The senior missed a chance to be-
come a double winner as be was
edged in the high jump by sopho-
more Rick Hunt. Gone "Holly-
wood" for the day by wearing sun-
glasses, Densham cooly cleared
the bar at 6'6", as did Hunt. Both
missed their three chances at 6'8".
Hunt was awarded first on the
basis of fewer misses.
Jack Harvey continued to per-
POLE VAULT-1. Caamare (M);
2. McPhearson (I); 3. Wells (M).
Helght-14'6"1.
HIGH JUMP - 1. Hunt (M); 2.
Densham (M); 3. (tie) Purple (M)
and Swift (I). Height-6'6".
SHOT PUT-1. Harvey (M); 2..
Leuchtman (M); 3. Daulton (I).
Distance-57Ai".
LONG JUMP-1. Densham (M); 2.
Norris (M); 3. Black (M). Distance
-21'41/".
ONE MILE RUN-1. Kelly (M);
. Dennis (M); 3. Humphrey (I).
#ime-4:21.8.
440-YD. DASH - 1. Gerometta
(M); 2. Hoey (M); 3. Graham (I).
Time--:49.6.
65-YD. HIGH HURDLES-1. White
(I); 2. Graham (M); 3. Fox (M).
Time-:06.3.
1000-YD. RUN-1. Coffin (M); 2.
Mercer (M); 3. Russell (I). Time-
2:12.6.
60-YD. DASH-i1. Brown (MW); 2.
Reid (M); 3. Weddle (I). Time-
:06.3.
600-YD. RUN-1. Grove (M); 2.
Shriver (I); 3. Bartels (M). Time
--1:12.7.
300-YD. DASH-1. Weddle (I); 2.
Dilling (I); 3. Laidley (M). Time-
:32.3.
880-YD. RUN-1. Morales (M); 2.
McDonald (MW); 3. Legacki (1W).
Time-1:54.8.
TWO-MILE RUN - 1. Benedict
(MW);-2. Dolan (MW); 3. Wiedman (I).
Time->9.13.7.
65-YD. LOW HURDLES-1. White
(I); 2. Graham (M); 3. Fox (M).
Time-:07.7.
MILE RELAY--. Indiana (Gra-
ham, Laws, Russell, Shrver); 2.
.Michigan. Time-3 :42.2.

form well in the shot put as he
heaved the iron 57'1/2", a little
more than a foot less than his
record-breaking performance of
last week. Steve Leuchtman also
backed up his performance of last
week with another toss of better
than 53'.
George Canamare cleared the
bar at 14'6" in the pole vault, the
only contestant to do so. Football
defensive back Dick Wells placed
third.
Indiana's only strength of the
day showed up in the hurdles.
Hoosier Bob White, a doubtful
starter before the meet, copped
firsts in both the highs and lows.
Wolverines Nelson Graham and
Woodie Fox finished hot on
White's heels in both races. Roy
Woodton pulled up lame early in
the high hurdle event, and. was
scratched from the lows.
Returning to Form
Dorie Reid, last year a Big Ten
champion in the 60-yard dash,E
showed evidence that he is re-
turning to form as he finished
second in the event. Willie Brown
sped to first. Indiana speedster
Randy Weddle could manage only
a third. Carl Ward did not run.
Hoosier co-captain Weddle re-
gained some stature when he
barely managed to eclipse team-
mate Dilling in the 300-yard dash.
Weddle placed third in the event
at the Michigan State Relays two
weeks ago.
Bob Gerometta turned in an
outstanding performance in the
440-yard dash, burning around the
BeIlloard
Although tomorrow's Mich-
igan-Iowa game is expected to
be a sell-out, there is still a
good supply of student tickets
left for the game. They will be
on sale at the Athletic Ticket
Office, State and Hoover, on
Monday until the supply is ex-
hausted.

cinder oval in 49.6 seconds. Com-
mented Coach Don Canham, "On
this track, that's really moving."
Wolverine Marion Hoey finishedl
second.
Lapping the Hoosiers
The deadly duo of Ted Benedict
and Jim Dolan waltzed off with
the two-mile event, Benedict fin-
ally winning. The pair led all the
way and had lapped both Hoosier
contestants with three laps left.
Benedict's finishing kick was1
greater than Dolan's, and the sen-
ior won by 20 yards.,
Most of the excitement of the
day came during a freshman two-
mile relay exhibition. A team com-
posed of Tom Kearney, Jim 01-
sen, John Reynolds, and Ron
Kutschinski cracked the Yost Field
House record for the event by four
seconds with a clocking of 7:37.9.
Kutschinski turned in an excel-
lent anchor leg of 1:53.6.
E SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
Kentucky 78, Tennessee 64
Duke 77, North Carolina 63
Louisville 81, Wichita 66
Oregon State 54, Washington St. 47
St. Joseph's (Pa) 101, Xavier (Ohio) 83
St. John's (NY) 70, Marquette 68
Cornell 81, Penn 76
Brown 76, Dartmouth 66
Columbia 67, Princeton 62
Syracuse 100, Westminster (Pa) 66
Cincinnati 56, Drake 49
Massachusetts 73, Maine 69
Wayne (Mich) 89, Western Reserve 70
Kansas 110, Nebraska 73
NBA
Philadelphia 114, Baltimore 98
Boston 100, New York 95
Los Angeles 131, Detroit 118
NHL
Montreal 4, New York 3
Toronto 3, Boston 2
Chicago 4, Detroit 1

Big Ten Standings
- L Pct.
MICHIGAN 9 2 .818
Michigan State 8 3 .727
Iowa 7 4 .636
Illinois 6 5 .545
Minnesota 6 5 .545
Northwestern 6 5 .545
Ohio State 4 7 .364
Wisconsin 3 8 .273j
Indiana 3 8 .273
Purdue 3 8 .273
Yesterday's Games
MICHIGAN 105, Purdue 85
Minnesota 94, Illinois 92
Michigan State 69, Indiana 63
Northwestern 78, Ohio State 77
Iowa 80, Wisconsin 70
Monday's Games
Iowa at MICHIGAN
Minnesota at Indiana
Michigan State at Ohio State
Northwestern at Wisconsin
Purdue at Illinois
Saturday's Games
Northwestern at MICHIGAN
Purdue at Wisconsin
Iowa at Illinois
Michigan State at Indiana
Minnesota at Ohio State

igan's heels in the Big Ten basket-
ball race by subduing Indiana
69-63 last night.
The Spartans, holding their
pace one game behind leading
Michigan, overcame an off-night
on the floor by their superiority
over the Hoosiers in taking re-
bounds.
The t e a in s battled evenly
through most of the game. Bill
Curtis' basket at 7:28 of the sec-
ond half gave Michigan State a
52-49 lead and the Spartans never
were headed. State led 34-32 at
the half.
State, while making only 26 of
84 shots 'from the floor, put four
men in double figures in the scor-
ing. Stan Washington led with 18.
Max Walker topped Indiana
with 16.
Illini Fall to Gophers
MINNEAPOLIS - Minnesota,
trailing by 14 points with 111/2~
minutes remaining, rallied behind
Archie Clark and defeated Illinois
94-92 in a Big Ten basketball game
yesterday.
Gophers Lead
The Gophers took an 84-801
1 margin with 3:41 left and had
their biggest lead at 90-83 with
1:28 remaining. Illinois cut the
lead to 92-90, but Dean Lopata's
two free throws in the final sec-
onds clinched the Minnesota vic-
tory.
Don Freeman led all scorers for
Illinois with 35 points. Clark top-
ped Minnesota with 25.
Northwestern Squeaks
EVANSTON - Northwestern
scored its fifth straight Big Ten
basketball victory last night by
edging Ohio State 78-77.
S. University Restaurant
OPEN
24 OURS A DAY
7Days a Week
PIZZA
111 S. Unive'rs'ity

all six Northwestern performers
scored in double figures.
. j ,
Hawks Dump Badgers
IOWA CITY - Iowa blew a 12-
point halftime lead but the Hawk-
eyes got going in the last six min-
utes and defeated Wisconsin 80-70
in Big Ten basketball here last
night.
Chris Pervall with 27 points and
George Peeples with 24 led Iowa
to a 7-4 record in the conference
with three games to go, including
an encounter with first place
Michigan coming up at Ann Arbor
Monday night.
Why
Are You
A Bore .
A noted publisher in Chicago
reports a simple technique of
everyday conversation which
can pay you real dividends in
Isocial and business. advance-
ment and works like magic to
give you poise, self confidence
and greater popularity.
According to this publisher,
many people do not realize how
much they could influence
others simply by what they say
and how they say it. Whether
in business, at social functions,
or even in casual conversations
with new acquaintances, there
are ways to make a good im-
pression every time you talk.
To acquaint the readers of
this paper with the easy-to-
follow rules for developing skill
in everyday conversation, the
publishers have printed full de-
tails of their interesting self-
training method in a new book,
"Adventures in Conversation,"
which will be mailed free to
anyone who requests it. No ob-
ligation. Send your request to:
Conversation, 835 D i v e r s e y
Parkway, Dept. C 152, Chicago,
Ill., 60614. A postcard will do.
Please include your Zip Code.

TUES., MARCH 1
6:30 P.M.

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M. W.. KELLOG

The Michigan Daily is
oniy for those of rare insight,
fine historical perspective,

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program schedule
THE
NEW YORK
PHI LHARMONIC
ORCHESTRA
Tune in the Philharmonic each Sunday at 2:00 p.m.,
(WUOM-FM, 91.7 on your dial), brought to you through
special arrangements between the University of Mich-
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The current program schedule is:
Sunday, February 27
BERNSTEIN, Conducting; RUDOLF SERKIN, piano soloist;
Brahms: Serenade No. 2;
Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2
Sunday, March 6

* The Paulist Father is a modern
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utilizes modern techniques to ful-
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9 If the vital spark of serving God
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you, why not pursue an investiga-
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Paulist Fathers have developed an
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interested in devoting his life to
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A Kellogg representative will be interviewing on your
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sense.

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