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February 27, 1966 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-27

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SUNDAY, FEBRUARY ?7, 1966

PAGE TWO TIlE MICHIGAN DAILY SINDAY. FEBRUARY 27, 1966

77--

FILMS:

Disney's

'Winnie,

A Poohperfect Classic

THEATRE
Chiidren's Play: Adult Approach

By JAMES SCHUTZE
Those persons, who neglect to
see Disney's "Winnie the Pooh"
while it is playing at the State
Theatre will be depriving them-
selves of one of the few diverting
experiences to come out of Holly-
wood in the last seventy-eight
years.
Disney compiled chapters one
and two of A. A. Milne's book.
("In Which We Are Introduced
To Winnie The Pooh And Some
Bees And The Stories Begin," and
"In Which Pooh Goes Visiting And
Gets Into A Tight Place"), meld-
ing the two story lines together for
forty minutes of absorbing drama.
We all know the story of Pooh's
cheerfully glutinous appetite for
honey and the trouble it often
brought to him. The movie treats
in detail Pooh's scandalous raid
on the Honey Tree in which he
ascends to the hive clutching a
blue balloon aftet. rolling in the

Muddy Place to disguise himself
as a black cloud. The desperate
tension which grips Pooh when the
bees first grow suspicious of his
improbable presence sears across
the screen with crackling intensity
when Pooh attempts to bolster his;
faltering desception by singing,
"How sweet to be a cloud,
Floating in the blue!
Every little Cloud
Always sings aloud."
Pooh's subsequent misfortune at
the hands of the undeluded bees
leads the movie into a reenactment
of the tragic accident which befell,
him while visiting Rabbit's under-
ground house. Readers will re-
member that Pooh so shamelessly
gorged himself on the eternally
hospitable Rabbit's honey that he
got stuck on his way back up to
the surface, exposing only his un-
smiling sticky face to the out of
doors. The sequence, though some-
what drawn out by director Wolf-

gang Reitherman, is an accurate
and entertaining reconstruction of
the actual event as it happened in
1933.
Reitherman, in general, does
not distinguish himself in this
film. His choice of the Hundred
Acre Forest location for the shoot-
ing would have been perfect had
he included more shots of the
forest itself and less of Rabbit's
unprepossessing domicile. In the
future, Reitherman would probably
do better to address himself chief-
ly to television documentaries and
singing.- commercials rather than
animated drama. His one saving
grace in this instance, however,
was an uncanny sense of casting.
Winnie the Pooh, leads the cast
with a disarmingly personal por-
trayal of himself. He delivers his
terse lines withthe sort of breezy
self-confidence and nonchalance
which thoroughly delights a
youthful audience.t His feeling for

the role of Pooh is established
almost immediately when he opens
the movie with a soliloquy deliver-
ed before his mirror explaining
that he is "rumbly in the tumbly."
His ability carries him successfully
to the movie's end with only one
slight (and forgiveable) article
transgression, an unnecessary and
unkind aside in which he re-
marks with nose in air, that the
gohper, a bit player, was not in
the book.
Fine performances were also
turned in by Kanga, Roo, Rabbit,
Eeyore, Owl, and Piglet. Perhaps
the only actor who did not earn
praise was Christopher Robin,
who played his part with a bored
detachment which may suggest
that he is outgrowing the role and
knows it.
Eeyore, the permanently de=
pressed don0 y of. the forest,
brought tears to the hearts of the
entire audience when he explained

dolefully that he missed his acci-
dentally misplaced tail not for its
beauty alone but, "because I was
attached to it."
The reader must be warned that
this particular treatment of Pooh's
tale was designed specifically for
the tastes of little boys who won't
stay in their seats and little girls
who laugh at all the jokes. The
dark underlying psychological ten-
sion of A. A. Milne's book is not
reproduced in any form in this
film, probably because the cast
saw no point in dragging it all out
in public again.
And perhaps that is all for the
best. There can be no real justifi-
cation for obliging Pooh and com-
pany to go to a lot of extra trouble
merely for the amusement of bored
psychology students. And as the
little girl sitting with her father
in front of this reviewer summed
up afterward, "That was a fun
movie."

By BETSY COHN
".Dick and Jane Eat Goose-
berries" seems to have lost its
appeal to the sophisticated chil-
dren of today. In theater, as in
everything else, they are looking
for "substance."
The University Players and the
speech department, provide for
both: sophisticated youngdaudi-
ences and substance through the
combined efforts of Michael Har-
rah, a teaching fellow in the
speech department and Margaret
McKerrow, director of Players'
Children's Theatre.
Together, they have turned out
a libretto for a new musical,
"Pierre Pathelin," for which Roger
Wertenberger, a former student of
the school of music, has written
the music. Put all together--they
have come up with a show for
children which takes an adult
approach.
Pierre (David-Rhys Anderson)
is a lawyer, so clever that no one
will hire him. In an effort to
clothe himself and" his wife re-
spectably, Pierre must connive to
get clothes from the Draper (Ken-
neth Chomont). This infuriates
the draper who is already un-
happy because he believes that his
shepherd has stolen some sheep.
The result is that Pierre defends
the Shepherd (Alan Heminger) in
court and the Draper becomes
totally confused between the sheep
he lost to the Shepherd and the
cloth he lost to Pierre. Pierre loses

money after being cheated by the
sly shepherd, and the bright eyed
rosy cheeked audience is smacked
firmly in the face with the moral'
that honesty pays while crooked
Shepherds don't.
The original "Pierre Pathelin"
is an old French farce, written
around 1200 A.D. For 700 years
"Pierre" had been considered an
adult play, now the Harrah-

McKorrow team has transformed
it to a delightful comedy, complete
with music and substance.
"Pierre Pathelin" is itself a
milestone for children's threare
as the first musical the children's
theater has performed.
The last performance of this
comedy-farce will be this after-
noon in Trueblood Auditorium at
'2 p.m.

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CREATIVE ARTS
FESTIVAL

NEW CHRISTY MINSTRELS
BLOCK TICKET ORDERS
must be returned by 3 P.M., Wednesday, March 2

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The Daily 'ficialilletin is an
official.4publiation io fthe Univer-
sity of Michigan for which The
Michigan tbaily assunl es no editor-
ial respopslbility, 'Noticeg should be
sent in TYPEWRITTEN form to
Room 3519,Administration Bldg. be.-
fore 2 p.m. of:. the day piecediiig
publfeatidn. and .by Zp.m. Friday
for Saturday and 'Sunday. General
Notices 'may be published a maxi-
mum of two times or request; Day
Calendar:.items appear once, only.
Student ortg.niation notices are not.
accepted for publicatlon.-
SUNDAY FEBRUARY 27
Day Calendar
UniversityPlayers Children's Theatre
Perfo-rnanee-'Pierre Pathelin by
Michael HarralMargaret McSerrow and
Roger Wertenberge: 'Trueblood Aud.,
2 p.m.
School ia Msic De ee Recital-
Evan Ferber,, ._pianist Recital _Hall,
School of-Music, 4:30.p.m.
Cinema Guild-Jacques Tati in "Mr.
Hulot's Holiday": Architecture Aud., 7
and 59p.m.
International Emphasis Month Ad-
dress-G. Mennen Williams, assistant
secretary -of state for African affairs,
"Recent Developments in Africa": Mich-
igan Union Ballroom, 7 p.m.

Events Monday
Dept. of Philosophy Lecture-John
Rawis, Dept. of Philosophy, Harvard
University, "A. Sketch.-of a Theory of
the Good":.2003 AngellBall; 4 p.m.y
Dante Centenary Lecture Oscar
Budel, Dept. of Romance Languages,
"The Diviia. Commiedia and. Poetic
Truth": Rackham Amphitheatre, 4:10
p.m.
Human Growth and Development and
Dentistry Lecture-James F. Bosma,
National Institute of Dental Research,
"Development of the Mouth in Infancy
and Childhood": Kellogg Auditorium,
School of Dentistry, 4:15 p.m.
Basketball-U-112 vs. Iowa, Yost Field
House, 8 p.m.'
Dept. of Slavic Languages and Litera-
tures University Lecture-Svetozar Pe-
trovic, Zagreb University, Yugoslavia,
"Trends in Recent Yugoslav Literary
Scholarship' West, Conference Room,
Rackham Bldg., 8 p.m.
Peace Corps Anniversary: Director,
Jack Hood Vaughn participates in. a
ceremony on the Union steps at 12:15
p.m., gives a major address in. the
Union Ballroom at 12:30; students,,fac-
ulty, public invited, Mon., Feb .28.
Center for Russian Studies Lecture:
Soviet and post-revolutionary Chinese
literature-a comparison, given by Mrs.

Milena. Dolezhel, Lane Hail, Commons
Room, 4:10 p.m., Mon., Feb. 28.
General Notices
Commencement Exercises: Will be
held on April 30 in the Stadium at
10:30 in the morning. Details will be
announced later.
The Martha Cook Bldg. will remain
open for the first eight weeks of the
Spring-Summer Session (May 2-June
24). Any University woman may apply.
Telephone NO 2-3225 for information.'
Doctoral Examination for Peter D.
Berardo, Pharmaceutical Chemistry;
thesis: "Crystal Growth and Dissolu-
tion Rate.Studies of Two Polymorphic
Compounds, Sulfathiazole and Methyl-
prednisolene," Mon., Feb. 28, 3002.
Pharm. Res. Bldg., at 2 p.m. Chair-
man, W. I. Higuchi.
Placement
ANNOUNCEMENT:
Peace Corps - Jack Hood Vaughn,
Peace Corps director, will make his first
public address Mon., Feb. 28. A Michi-
gan alumnus, Mr. Vaughn will parti-
cipate in a brief ceremony on the
Union steps at 12:15 p.m., to com-
memorate the fifth anniversary of the
corps. At 12:30 p.m., he will address
a public audience in the Union Ball-
room.
PLACEMENT INTERVIEWS: Bureau of
Appointments-Seniors & grad students,
please call 764-7460 for appointments
with the following:
MON;, FEB. 28-
SMarine; TrustNCo. of Western New
York, B'uffaio, N.Y.-Men~ with degrees.
in Gen. Lib. Arts, Astro., Econ., Geog.,
Geol. -Lib. Sci., Math, Philo., Soc. &
Edc. fog baoxl)Ipg mgmt. trng, program'
(p m. only).
Chemical Abstracts Service, Ohio State
Univ., Columbius, Ohio-All degree lev-
els Yin. Biochem., Analyt., Gewg, Organ-
ic, Inorg. & Physical Chem., Math &
Ends Wednesday
WORTH
SEEING!"
N.Y. Herald Tribune

Pharm. for Elec. computing, Tech. writ-E
ing, chem. info .processing; All na-
tionalities welcome to interview (p.m.1
only).
National Steel Corp., Detroit, Mich.1
-Men, BS in Econ. for market res. lo-i
cated in Weirton, W. Va. & Detroit.
TUES., MARCH.1--
New York State Civil Service-Mr.
Zaron, a Mich. alumnus, will give in-
formation to interested students at 4<
p.m. about opportunities with N.Y.
State and the testing program which
qualifies grads for positions. Not re-
stricted to N.Y. state residents. Maket
appointment early.1
Socony Mobil Oil Co., Niles, Ill.-BAz
& adv. degrees in Gen. Lib. Arts, Econ.1
& Chem. (Org. & Phys.) for mkt. trng.,
res., territorial sales. Mktg. trng. pro-a
gram leads to managerial positions.
U.S. & international locations.
Humble Oil & Refining, Houston, Tek.
-Men, BA's in Gen. Lib. Arts &
Econ. for territorial sales located
throughout U.S. (p.m. only).
Defense Intelligence Agency, Wash.,
D.C.--BA & MA's in Gen. Chem., Econ.,c
Geog., Geol., Lib. Sci., Math, Physics,#
Public Health, Forestry & area studies
for positions in elec. computing, library,
LAST 5 DAYS

and intelligence res.
Burroughs, Wellcome & Co., Tucka-
hoe, N.Y.-Men with degrees in any
field of study for pharmaceutical sales
& sales promotion. Many U.S. locations
(p.m. only).
John Hancock Mutual Life Insurance
Co., Detroit-Men with degrees in Gen.
Lib. Arts, Hist., Psych., Speech, Bus.
Ad., etc. for insurance sales (p.m.
only).
SPECIAL ANNOUNCEMENT:
American Oil Co.-J. T. Bell will in-
terview BA grads in Econ. & Math for
positions in Elec. Computing, Person-
nel, Purchasing & Transport., at the
Bus. School on Tues., March 1. For
appointments, go to Room 254 Bus.
Ad. School or call 764-1372.
SUMMER PLACEMENT:
212 SAB-
INTERVIEWS MARCH 1-
Camp Tamarack, Ortonville, Mich.
-Coed. Counselors, waterfront (m),
arts & crafts (n), trippers, truck, bus
driver (m) & nurse. Applications avail-
able at 212 SAB.
Camp Conestoga, Ohio-Boys. General
(Continued on Page 8)
Shows at 1:30-4:30-8:00 P.M.
Matinees.. . $1.25
Evenings & Sunday .... $1.50
Children...............75c

PH. 482-2056
FREE In-CARPENTERROAD
FREE IN-CAR HEATERS

i

Seven.Academy Awards!
CINEMA II
presents.
DAVID LEAN'S
Bridge ..on t River Kwai
Alec Guinness William Holden
Jack Hawkins
in TECHNICOLOR
SATURDAY FEBRUARY 26 & 27
7:00 &9:45 P.M. AUDITORIUM A
SUNDAY Admission: 50c
6:00 & 8:45 P.M.
Coming Mareh 12 & 13-Davi & Lisa'

BOX OFFICE OPEN 6:30
PLUS AT 7:10 & 10:45
COLOR
t CINEMASCOPE

1*

Q> fl.Y }, . .... ' $":LSVf> ' ,: M.tWAYt. >" .....'" ^ ,.f .
ORGAN IZATION CESI

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Shown at 9:00 Only

I

USE OF THIS COU MN FOR AN-,
NOUNCEMENTS is av lable to official-
ly recognized and registered student
organizations only. Forms are available
in- Room 1011 SAB.
Bahal Student Group-UAC, Interna-
tional Folksing, Sun., Feb. 27,. 2:30
p.m., International Center, Michigan
Union. All welcome-bring your instru-
ments. Refreshments. Admission free..
Cinema II, "Banana Peel," "The Anat-
omy of a Murder," Feb. 26, 27, and
March 5 and 6, 7 and 9 p.m., Aud. A.
* * *
Folk Dance Club (WAA), Intermedi-
ate Folk Dancing, every Monday, 8:30-
10':30 p.m, Women's Athletic Bldg.
* * *
Gamma Delta, International Luther-
an student organization, 1511 Washte-
naw, Sunday supper: 6; program: 6:45,
"Information, Please." Elections also
to be held. All welcome.
* * *
Guild House, Sunday Seminar, "The
City: Opportunity and Deliverance,"

iFep. 27, 7-8:15 p9m. Guild house, 802
IVt0& Ioe. _-
'* * *
La . Sociedad Hispanica, Tertulia,
lunes, 3-5 p.m., 3050 Frieze Bldg. Ven-
gan sdos.
* * *
Lutheran Student Chapel, Hill St. at
Forest Ave., worship services at 9:30 &
11 a.m.-Discussion on "The Relation of
Science & Theology, 7 p.m.
Michigan Underground, Meeting open
to all interested in caving, Room 3B
Union, 7 p.m., Mon., Feb. 28.
* , *
Newman Student Association, Grad-
uate Interdisciplinary Symposium,
Theme II, "Public Issues and Judg-
ment." Topic: "A Reductionist Ap-
proach to Morality," Mon., Feb. 28, 7-8
p.m., 331 Thompson.
University Lutheran Chapel, 1511
Washtenaw, Sunday morning services:
9:45 and 11:15. The sermon: "Sorrow-
ful, Yet Rejoicing," I Cor. 6:10. Bible
classes at 11:15. All welcome.

Nimerf8 Academy Awards-indudi 5VBst rictre
p°5''AEY B YWIP BURNlFPPIPI\ ' HARRISOEI
ENDS MARCH 3 ~~'IILL'II ~I

ITS A DOG-roNE
DAFFY' DISA ME!

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* 'TO NIGHT at 7 and 9
1.
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JACQU ES TAT I

MR. HULOTJ'S

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AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE
TO ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
exciting, challenging, and self rewarding. For many years you
have been preparing for this major step that leads from College
to Career. NOW THE TIME;HAS COME TO CONCENTRATE AND
ACT; TO FIND THE JOB YOU WANT. With competition for 'career-
launching jobs increasing at a rapid pace, A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED RESUME IS ESSENTIAL IN OPENING THE BEST DOORS!
Your resume, when written by a Professional Writer, will pinpoint
Your Assets, and present them in a clear positive way. It will save
you Valuable time in contacting the career opportunities You want.
At the RESUME BUREAU your resume is written by professional
writers, with specialized knowledge of personnel practices, and
wide experience in the Business and Technical worlds.
TIME TO START YOUR CAREER CAMPAIGN! I !! Learn how we
can help you to Sell Yourself, and find the job you've worked so
hard to prepare for!
WRITE TODAY
RESUME BUREAU, 47 Kearney St., San Francisco, Cal.
Patronize Our Advertisers

HO IDAY

MONDAY, Feb.28

8:00 p.m.

CARL OGLESBY
National Chairman of SDS

The great French comedian's
funniest film
Short: "HER BOY FRIEND"
(Larry Semon)

will speak on
"American Contaiment
& World Revolution"

Laved

.WN... .,..... %i
- uu
TME T.ECHNICOLOR"
'alt 6dDisney
neliet
TCHN~aa
W,. by 6MXNA VISTA 006.*1o oC4 b!%
Shown at 1 :00
- 3:00-5:00-7:00 & 9:05

#i

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I
TIE CIUMi BUILD1U

U
U
I

IN THE ARCHITECTURE AUOITORIUM

:1

AUD. A, ANGELL HALL

AOMISSION: FIFTY CENTS;
. .I.

M!

17

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MONDAY, FEB. 28

FOURTH

ANN ARBOR
FILM FESTIVAL

I

Peace Corps Anniversary Ceremony
* JACK VAUGHN, new director of the Peace Corps,
will make a major policy statement on the front
steps of the Union at 12:15.
* ANNIVERSARY PROGRAM on the Peace Corps will
follow in the Union Ballroom at 12:30.
r Also speaking will be:
Lyle Johnson, Mayor of Albion
Councilman Douglas Cranz

Ii. MNNWILLIAM~vIS"
Ass't. Secretary of State for African Affairs
will speak on
A frica's Developing Nations

Architecture and Design
Auditorium

*i

MARCH 9,10,11,12,13

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