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February 24, 1966 - Image 6

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The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-24

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 24,1966

..

PAGE SX THE ICHIGA DAILYT-URSDY. FEBUARY,2..,..~

v

MIKHIGAN MEN IN EUROPE
HAVE IT MADE-
WHEN THEY BUY, RENT OR LEASE
A CAR IN EUROPE FROM CTE
Write-Phone for Free Car Guide-Low Rate Student Plan
(AR -TOURS IN EUROPEr Inc.
555 Fifth Ave., N.Y., N.Y. 10017 0 PL 1-3550
Campus Rep. Richard Rogers, P.O. Box 112, Ann Arbor
CALL ANYTIME-662-5676

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Tourneys Select Cage Pairings

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#11/!el

By The Associated Press
The National Collegiate Athletic
Association announced first' round
pairings for the National Basket-
ball Championships yesterday.
Regional semifinals and finals
will take place March 11-12, with
the national semifinals and finals
being played at the University of
Maryland, College Park, March
18-19.
First round sites are at Virginia
Polytechnic Institute, Blacksburg,
Va.; the Palestra, Philadelphia;
Kent State, Kent, Ohio; and
Wichita State, Wichita, Kan.
The regional semifinals and
finals will be played at North
Carolina State, Raleigh; U~niver-
sity of Iowa, Iowa City; Texas
Tech, Lubbock; and UCLA, Los
Angeles.
Big Ten at Iowa
The Big Ten champion will com-
pete in the regionals with three

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SABBATH SERVICE
TOMORROW (Friday), at 7:15 P.M.
Address by
DR. ROBERT SKLAR
Assistant Professor, History
"THE PARTY OF ART IN CONTEMPORARY CULTURE"
John Planer, Cantor
The Hillel Choir, Mike Robbins, director
Joan Temkin, organist

ยข nfhar niiitifafe of Tmi7a P''iftr

Ctafn A1TQrnh I 'Tavac Wocfavi zrc f

B'NAI B'RITH HILLEL FOUNDATION
1429 Hill Street

All Are Welcome

AN IMPORTANT MESSAGE
TO ALL
GRADUATING SENIORS
The walls of ivy will soon be replaced by less familiar ones; equally
exciting, challenging, and self rewarding. For many years you
have been preparing for this major step that leads from College
to Career. NOW THE TIME HAS COME TO CONCENTRATE AND
ACT; TO FIND THE JOB YOU WANT. With competition for career-
launching jobs increasing at a rapid pace, A PROFESSIONALLY
PREPARED RESUME IS ESSENTIAL IN OPENING THE BEST DOORS!
Your resume, when written by a Professional Writer, will pinpoint
Your Assets, and present them in a clear positive way. It will save
you Valuable time in contacting the career opportunities You want.
At the RESUME BUREAU your resume is written by professional
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wide experience in the Business and Technical worlds.
TIME TO START YOUR CAREER CAMPAIGN! I! 1 Learn how we
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hard to prepare for!
WRITE TODAY
RESUME BUREAU, 47 Kearney St., San Francisco, Col.

Ivy League Re
Gains NCAA i
By The Associated Press
Ivy League participation in the
NCAA basketball tournament was
approved provincially yesterday
after conference officials reversed
their initial stand on the academic
requirement set by the NCAA.
Members of the NCAA must ac-
cept the minimum grade standard
of 1.6, based on a 4.0 scale, for
their athletes to compete in all
NCAA-sponsored athletic events.
The Ivy League schools had ex-
pressed opposition to the 1.6 level
on the grounds that no outside
agency should determine standards
for a school.
NCAA officials said yesterday,
however, that a majority of its
member schools, including the Ivy
Leaguers, had complied with the
grade requirement.
The list of complying members
stood yesterday at 444, or 77.7 per
cent. "The total active membership
is 571.
of the 444, some 20 colleges and
universities are on a provisional
basis pending a final tally, 28 are
still corresponding, and 99 def-
initely are not in compliance. The
deadline for acceptance is the end
of this week.
The Ivy League schools-Brown,
Columbia, Cornell, Dartmouth,
S. University Restaurant
OPENI

UnUer quietsat IUwa uiy . Ima e, ma ' t, 'exaswVLesternvs.
Eight at-large t e a m s were Oklahoma City; Southwest Con-
named yesterday. They are un- ference draws bye.
beaten Texas Western with a 20-0 West regionals: At Wichita
record, Colorado State University State, March 7, Colorado State
12-6, Loyola of Chicago 20-2, University vs. Houston; Western
Providence 21-4, Syracuse 18-4, Athletic Conference draws bye.
Dayton 18-4, Houston 19-4, and The maximum bracket is 25
Oklahoma City 21-4. clubs, 15 of which will be confer-
The first-round pairings: ence champions under normal cir-
East regionals: At VPI, March cumstances.
8, Middle Atlantic state champion Champions of the Atlantic
vs. Providence; at the Palestra, Coast Conference, the Southeast-
March 7, Southern Conference vs. ern Conference, the Missouri Val-
Yankee Conference. The Ivy ley, Big Eight, Athletic Associa-
League will play Syracuse at the tion of Western Universities and
Palestra March 7, or at VPI the West Coast Conference skip
March 8, if Pennsylvania wins the first round competition, along
Ivy League championship., with the Big Ten, and play in the
Mideast regionals: At Kent regional semifinals.
State, March 7, Mid-American Two conferences, the Southwest
Conference vs. Dayton; and Ohio and Western Athletic, drew byes
Valley Conference vs. Loyola of in the March 7-8 first-round
Chicago. pairings. As a result, the Western
Midwest regionals: At Wichita Athletic first round site was elim-
_____ inated, with its representative go-
ing to the West regional semifinals
, rS aat UCLA March 11.
Ve ires 3 U, Because of the two byes and the'
elimination, a doubleheader of
ourney B erth four at-large teams will be played
ourn v D t'LI atWichita State March 11.
# NIT Selects Five
Meanwhile, five teams were
Harvard, Pennsylvania, Yale and picked to compete in the National
Princeton-signalled their accept- Invitation Tournament at Madi-
ance of terms in a formal an- son Square Garden.
nouncement. The NIT will play all its games
NCAA President Everett D. in the Garden starting March 10
Barnes of ColgateUniversity ex- and ending March 19 with an
plained:l afternoon game.
"The Ivy group has submitted The NIT picked five of its 14-
evidence of conformity under the team field. By prior agreement its
NCAA legislation as it affects committee did not contact teams
them and has signified its mem- until an hour after the NCAA
bers' intention to forward the . T
required material relative to their This W eeke
admission procedures."1
Walter Byers, NCAA executive FRI
director, said individual Ivy League
schools are wiring their good faith HOCKEY-Michigan at Mic
confirming the league's stand. SATU
"Removal of provisional status BASKETBALL-Michigan at
of all 20 colleges in that category HOCKEY-Michigan vs. Micr
is contingent upon receiving the WRESTLING-Michigan at 1
necessary supporting information," TRACK-Michigan vs. Indian
Byers said. GYMNASTICS-Michigan at

MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Illinois
Iowa
Minnesota
Northwestern
Ohio State
Indiana
Purdue
Wisconsin

8
7
6
6
5
5
4
3
3

2
3
4
4
5
5
6
7
7
7

.800
.700
.600
.600
.500
.500
.400
.300
.300
.300

Big Ten Standings

made its bids.
The five picked for the NIT in-
cluded St. John's of Brooklyn, the
defending champions, with a 17-5
record. Others included Boston
College, DePaul, Penn State and
Virginia Tech.
Tournament Reruns
St. John's, which won the tour-
nament last year as a farewell
present to its retiring coach, Joe
Lapchick, has a 17-5 won-lost
record with three more to play.
Boston College, coached by for-'
mer Celtic star Bob Cousy, had a
16-4 record with three to play.'
DePaul, which won the tourna-
ment in 1945, has a 16-5 mark
and Penn State is 15-4. Virginia
Tech has a 19-4 record.
There was no indication when
the others would be selected. Pre-
sumably it depended on the final
standings in some of the con-
ferences.

Saturday's Games
MICHIGAN at Purdue
Illinois at Minnesota
Indiana at Michigan State
Ohio State at Northwestern
Wisconsin at Iowa
nd in Sports
DAY
higan State
RDAY
Purdue
higan State, Coliseum, 8:00
Michigan State
na, Yost Field House
t Michigan State

The
Margin for Error
Gil Saniberg
Now that the weatherman seems to have misplaced 12 feet
of snow and the football season appears to be over (you never
can tell . . . about either), the eventual arrival of spring is almost
assured this year.
Ah sprig! Besides colds, hay fever, term papers, and finals,
we find something else due-training. That's for baseball, not
combat. You remember baseball-that leizurely, pacific game
where batman meets batboy to plan the downfall of an arch
opponent? Given that basic insight into the essence of the sport,
I feel it is now possible to impart further instruction, this time
on a specific group of participants, a group that has made base-
ball worth watching again.
This is the first half of a rationale for the team which might
have been created for THE MARGIN, the team which best
embodies its spirit. You could call it:
The New York Mets
And How They Grew
OR:
How 8,000,000 People Learned To Stop
Yawning and Love a Bomb
PART THE FIRST: "Prehistoric"
OK. Let's get right down to it. This story is complicated, ridicu-
lous, and, in the words of the Ol' Perfesser (now retired with a broken
ego), "amazin'."
Well, let's put it this way. What twentieth place team in the
history of sport (and this includes dragon-slaying) could afford to
have carpetting under the heavy feet of a bunch of world-beaters
whose greatest talent lay in snatching defeat out of the jaws of
victory in more ways than three separate books have thus far
enumerated?
Yeah, but in the locker room?
They took the oldest cast-of fs around, fellas who had seen better
days-some of them glory days-but whose talents were not con-
sidered valuable enough to pay for any longer. These were veterans,
gnarled and tough. But their former employers figured that the
years had piled too high to hope that a toll hadn't been taken in
steps, in percentages, in spirit.
And so they had been shipped out with generous, if strained,
farewells after being told that they were just not adept enough at
their old jobs anymore.
Before anyone starts bowing let me make it clear that this
was only the management. The ballplayers, even compared to
the Mets staff, were something else again. Because, remember, it
was this group of coaches, managers, general managers, and
Janitors that had to pick the first bunch of "professionals" out
of the dirtiest, low-down, rotten grab-bag set up in the annils
of business.
"When we started with all the good(smile) players we bought
for $600,000," said Stengel recently, "we had to teach men how to
bend over. We did that 15 minutes a day . . . and for three days
they couldn't walk."
Anecdotes? That's what the Mets were, a series guaranteeing
a minimum of 162 sure-to-roll-em-in-the-aisles-and-make-em-
wanna-see-if-they're-for-real stories per year. It was what Wally
Weber probably figures Heaven is like.
Did you ever hear the one about the third baseman who couldn't
hit, run, or field, and then switched leagues to become an All-Star
second sacker with a bat so hot that his only problem was that the
ball tended to fuse to it?
Did you ever hear the one about the first baseman who made
a diving catch on a towering fly which the wind had carried, smashing
into the right field wall (this and many other physically impossible
feats were possible in the Polo Grounds) hard enough to dent it and
immediately afterwards took a token pick-off lob to first (and this
you can't even chalk up to the Polo Grounds) and booted it around
long enough for the runner to score standing?
The legend of Mary Throneberry will live on as long as there
is an error or a bonehead play left in the game. The Cult of Marvelous
Mary, a semireligious group of antihero worshippers, will be discussed
at a later date (notes need not be taken).
But the aura of "loveableness" was not so easily won. And
it was only loveableness, spelled A T T E N D A N C E with
a capital $, that could possibly have kept a business firm which
employed the likes of Felix Mantilla and Marvelous Mary and
Roger Craig, the finest 20-game loser in baseball, from going
bankrupt before that first nuttsy year-1962-was over ...
And what exactly did the Mets have?
They had New York City and it was 1962. The Dodgers were
gone. The Giants were gone. Ebbets Field was gone. The Polo
Grounds was going back to what its creators had built it for.
Walter O'Mally was gon'e. (On second thought, forget about O'Mally.
He doesn't fit in with a heavy emotional appeal like this.)
And across the river the Yankees carried on with their
criminal activities. For the first time in history a team had to
appologize for winning. The poor Bombers just couldn't seem

to break the habit, and they were crucified for it by a corps of
blase sportwriters who had run out of mixed metaphors and
pedantic platitudes to sling at the public. The "boys" couldn't
come up with that "wise saying" for the morning addition
any more.
In the end the guys in pin stripe fooled them all. Because while
no one was looking they were changing. And after 1961, when they
carried the greatest 1-2 punch baseball had ever seen, the Bombers
were winning on not more than a few things: tradition, Mickey
Mantle, Whitey Ford, Mickey Mantle, reputation, Mickey Mantle, and
finally Mel Stottlemyre ... and Mickey Mantle.
Last year Mantle wasn't in good enough physical shape to get
into the Cub Scouts. The Yanks came apart.
And so the Mets ...
(Next-PART THE LAST: "The Spectator-Participation Sport"

*

SPORT SHORTS:
Frosh Alcindor: UCLA's Best

By The Associated Press

But other experts look on in

24 HOURS A DAY
7 Days a Week
PIZZA,
1121 S. University

awe
LOS ANGELES-After 17 games wVarsity Coach Mary Harsham
of college freshman basketball, the Vrity Cashng rv arsda
verdict is in on 7-foot-i Lew Al- of rival Washington State told a
cindor and the decision is almost reporter: "Unfortunately I saw
unanimous. He is astounding. the UCLA freshmen play last
The high-rise center from New night. What can you say? Alcindor
York City, coveted by a hundred is simply great. He can hold you
colleges lA, has averaged 33.7 points ball in the basket with the other."
and 21 rebounds in leading his Skip College Ball?
team to 17 consecutive victories- Former Boston Celtics' star Bill
most by margins of 50 or 75 points. Sharman took a couple of looks
Opposing coaches describe him and pronounced Alcindor ready
as a younger combination of Wilt for National Basketball Associa-
Chamberlain and Bill Russell. tion play right now. Sharman says
Like Royalty he could be worth $100,000 a year.
UCLA coaches shield him from His team's games have been al-
newsmen and seem reluctant to most entirely against junior col-
comment on his exploits on the lege teams, made up of freshmen
grounds that too much fanfare and sophomores, and the winning
would be a disrupting influence on scores are invariably over 100
an 18-year-old. points.
lo

,

ANNOUNCING:MARCH 13, 20, 27

INTERDISCIPLINARY SEMINAR ON
"GUILT AND RESPONSIBILITY"
in the writings of MARTIN BUBER
for faculty and graduate students
DR. MARVIN FOX, DEPT. OF PHILOSOPHY, OHIO STATE UNIV.
DR. MANFRED VOGEL, DEPT. OF RELIGION, NORTHWESTERN UNIV.
MRS. CHRISTINE DOWNING, LITERATURE, RUTGERS UNIV.
Lecture 3-4 P.M. (Open to Public) Seminar 4-5 P.M. (Limit: 35 persons)
Registration closes March 6th Registration fee: $1.50
Write Buber Seminar, 602 E. Huron St. or phone NO 8-6881
sponsored by Office of Religious Affairs, Ecumenical Campus Staff,
Hillel Foundation, Newman Center

In one game Lew made 21 field
goals in 23 tries. In another it
was 17 out of 20.
Koufax Wants Raise
LOS ANGELES - Southpaw
Koufax said yesterday that he
and fellow pitcher Don Drysdale
are going as a 50-50 team in their
salary demands from the cham-
pion Los Angeles Dodgers.
Koufax, as was the case with
Drysdale, politely declined to men-
tion the amount of money sought,
reportedly a million dollars be-
tween them on a three-year con-
tract.
Vice President E. J. (Buzzie)
Bavasi, who is handling the dis-
pute, said he plans to meet with
his star hurlers Thursday, and
added:
"If they are serious in their
demands, and I have no reason to
believe they aren't, I doubt that
they will be on the plane to train-
ing camp at Vero Beach Satur-
day."
Koufax won 26 games and
Drysdale 23 in 1965. Drysdale re-
portedly was paid $75,000 and
Kouf ax $74,000.
No Car for Clay
MAIMI, Fla.-An attorney for
Cassius Clay's ex-wife said yester-
day he is just about ready to at-
tach the heavyweight champion's
brand new red Cadillac limousine
to help meet fees for his recent
divorce suit.
Lawrence Hoffman, an attorney
for Sonji Clay, said he might also
try to get Clay's $8,000 wardrobe.
The combined revenue would go
a long way toward meeting the
$22,500 fee Clay was ordered to
pay when he won the divorce.
"He won't need them if he's
going to the Army anyway," Hoff-
man said.

0

wl

I

nip

"TILE VATICAN COUNCIL"

2000 W. Stadium Blvd.

FATHER GEORGE TAVARD, A.A.

i a av ...fl r-l flfl-wr.Wmal

HOWARD KOHN

I

8 P.M., Friday, Feb. 25
Auditorium A, Angell Hall
Ordained to the priesthood in France FATHER
TAVARD received his doctorate (S.T.D.) from
the Catholic Faculteds of Lyons in 1 949, Now
chairman of the Department of Theology at
Mount Mercy College (Pittsburgh), he has
taught in England and been stationed at "Mai-
son de Ia Bonne Presse" in Paris and at the
Church of Our Lady of Guadalupe in New York.
He is consultant to the Pontifical Secretariat
for the Unity of. Christians and permanent
Catholic observer-consultant to the Consulta-
tions for Church Union. His publications include
The Catholic Approach to Protestantism, The
Church, the Layman, and the Modern World,
Holy Writ or Holy Church: the Crisis of the

If you do you'll get right over to Ann Arbor Bank to open your
Specialcheck checking account. Why? Because it's the most eco-
nomical checking account available for you if you write just a
few checks a month. With Specialcheck account you just pay 10c
for each check you write and that's all! There's no service charge
or minimum balance required, and no charge in advance for
check-books. See Ann Arbor Bank about your Specialcheck check-
ing account.

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