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February 17, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-17

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 17, 1966

PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY THURSDAYS FEBRUARY 17, 1966

9 m I N 2 E .9 - - - - - - - - - -- - - - - - - -- - -- - - - - RRFN

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~ 1 -E p7

The

CHILD CARE WORKERS

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SALARY WITH FRINGE BENEFITS. WORK WITH
PROFESSIONAL TREATMENT STAFF.
CALL OR WRITE TO:
David B. Goldberg
Jewish Family & Children's Service
10801 Curtis, Detroit, Michigan 48221
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WA

FOUR HEADS ARE
BETTER THAN ONE
STAN KEMP JOHN O'REILL)
VALLY GABLER BOB WALSH
Bring you Ann Arbor's most complete,
on-the-spot, coverage
of all U of M home basketball games
WCBN-650
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dine

d2S. _ Icers Discover

Y

By Jim Tindall
An Open Letter
TO Fritz Criser

- 'Savior'
By BILL LEVIS
Usually when someone plays
defense on a hockey team as a
young child, it is because he is

in Lord
to get adjusted in this league. The
referees are very thorough. They
don't allow the game to get out of
control."
So far this season, Lord has
accumulated 52 minutes of penal-
ties. He was quick to point out,
though, that he no longer is lead-
ing the league in that department.
The dubious honor has been
claimed by Dick Paradise of the

l'

Bear Mr. Crisler:-VLSL iL A J;0ucxcA
Sr. C unable to play forward or just not
Two incidents in the last three home hockey games prompt me good enough. Such has not been
to write this letter. Both of these situations were made possible by the case of Michigan's up and
the conspicuous lack of protective screens in the Coliseum. Both coming sophomore defenseman,
could have resulted in serious personal injury, and both could have Bill Lord.
been prevented. Perhaps a brief explanation of the facts is in order. Lord plays defense because he
Two weekends ago in the third period of the Michigan-Michigan likes it and he has been at that
State game, a fan broke a stick over Spartan Brian McAndrew's head. position all his hockey career. "I
Although Michigan State Coach Amo Bessone refused to push the have always been a defenseman'
incident into court, he did comment that this pointed out the heexl. I like contact hance to
glaring need for some kind, any kind, of screens. This year Lord has been teamed
Last week an Ann Arbor police officer who witnessed the with senior defenseman Ted Hen-
attack did press charges of assault and battery, and the case derson. Lord feels that playing
will be tried February 23 by Circuit Court Judge O'Brien. The with him has been experience in
sentence will be a fine, imprisonment, or both depending on the itself. "He is there to cover up'
facts as ascertained by Judge O'Brien who was in contact with for me when I make a mistake. It
both McAndrew and Bessone this week. The fan "turned himself is good to be playing with an ex-
in" the day after the game saying, "I just lost my head." perienced defenseman. Without
This past weekend a Minnesota iceman was checked into the Ted, I don't think we would have
boards and his stick blade was seized by an enthusiastic spectator. won as many as we have."
Mike Crupi ripped the stick free and, in hockey terms, "speared" the Rapid Progress
fan in the chest. The referees did not see the attack since the action At the beginning of the year,
had shifted to the other end of the ice. Fortunately no injury was Lord was not teamed with his
inflicted upon the spirited fan who had tried to protect the Michigan defensemate of today. He explain-
player from any "extra-curricular stickwork" by Crupi. ed that he was the sixth defense-
Thus in the last three games there has been one attack on a man on the team then. 'Coach
player by a fan and one attack by a player on a fan. In three years made some changes and I ended
of regular attendance at the Coliseum I do not recall two incidents as up with Ted."

TO THE ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL
THAT HAS MOVED TO SIBERIA.

It has been suggested to the farm boy that moved
you down there that he run a shuttle-bus to the

flagrant, nor as close together, as these two.
I don't believe that these happenings refl'ect any, change in the
attitude of either the players or the fans. The opportunity for a
spectator to get involved in the action on the ice has always been
there, but the fact that such things can happen perhaps slips to
the back of one's mind.
Some students feel that half of the fun of going to a Michigan
hockey game is to sit near the ice because you feel so close to the
action. And indeed you are.
The sidewalls of the rink are a little above knee high on a
spectator walking to his seat. They are so low that a few years
ago a Michigan player bodychecked an opponent off of the ice
and into someone's lap.
As Mr. Bessone pointed out, Michigan is the only school in the
Western Collegiate Hockey Association that does not both protect
its players and fans from each other by screens of some sort. Cer-
tainll there is a "keeping up" aspect in intercollegiate athletic
facilities, but more importantly the other seven WCHA schools have
erected protective barriers for a reason. Perhaps Michigan now has
been given a reason too.
Certainly the cost of such screens is a major consideration.
I pretend to have no insight into the financial status of the Board

State Street

area; and he can have is cocoa, too.

Last year as a freshman, Lord
gained no actual game experience.
He was a hard, rugged player,
though, and developed enough to
make the varsity. Bill received his
basic training in the outskirts of
Minneapolis. In Edina, Minn.,
where he was raised, hockey is
the biggest winter sport. They
run state hockey tournaments like
most states run state basketball
tournaments.
As a high school player, Lord
was an all-state selection. When
it came time to choose college he
came to Michigan instead of Min-
nesota for various reasons. "When
I came to the campus I knew I
wanted to go here. It was not only
for hockey that I came here, it
was also for academics." Lord
right now is majoring in business.
Team Leader
This year, Lord has taken over
Barry MacDonald's role as pen-
alty leader. Bill does not, though,
see this as any honor. "In the be-
ginning of the season, I was mak-
ing many mistakes and getting a
lot of penalties. It takes a while

Minnesota Gophers.
As a defenseman, Lard has more
ice time than the forwards. He
has the opportunity to play with
all of the forward lines. Thus.
they have no set plays. Lord feels
that right now he has to tighten
up defensively. "Right now," he
explained, "we are giving up too
many goals to win."
Reach Peak
"We hit a peak against Mich-
igan Tech and just haven't seemed
to recover so far. We hustled last
week against Minnesota, but we
just didn't seem to get the breaks."
As to the future, Lords feels
that "we have to shootknow for
the playoffs. I would like to win
the rest of our games. On a given
night, this team can beat anyone.
Everyone has just got to hustle."
So far this year as a defense-
man, Lord has scored two goals.
He has also netted four assists. His
job as a defenseman, though, is
not to score goals but to prevent
the opposition from scoring.
Well Positioned
His partner on defense, the re-
liable Ted Henderson commented
about Bill's play this year. "He
is real easy to play with. He plays
on his side of the ice and I play
on mine. He is never caught up
the ice on a break. There is seldom
a three on one break.
"Bill has come along well his
sophomore year. He is very de-
pendable. He has caught on to the
plays fast and I know that I can.
count on him. Bill is just de-
fensively minded."
Lord is married and the proud
father of a baby girl. His biggest
ambition for the rest of the cur-
rent hockey season is to get into
the NCAA playoffs in Minnesota.
He feels the team is capable of
doing it. -
If Michigan can start rolling
this weekend against the cellar-
ridden Duluth team, maybe Bill
Lord's wish of the NCAA playoffs
can come true. Let's just hope so.

4

We miss all of you lost people.

of Control of Intercollegiate Athletics, but I do have
if a pressing, unbudgeted need arises money can
somewhere. I feel that serious consideration should
board to determine whether this is such a need.
As to the type of barrier certainly plexiglass
of the question; however, Michigan State uses
while North Dakota has link fence, and both

the feeling that
be gotten from
be gwven by the
would be out
chicken wire
are effective.

Redl

4

Durability is certainly a consideration, but so is time.
Both of these incidents occurred in the course of a normal two-
game series. In the course of the next three weeks there will hopefully
be three more home games: one regularly-scheduled game with
Michigan State, the first round playoff game with the Spartans, and
the second round playoff (the quarterfinals of the NCAA turoney)
with Michigan Tech. The tension and excitement will be even higher,
at these games than it was during the regular season. It will perhaps1
be easier to, as the fan being tried for assault and battery said, lose
one's head.
Thus I feel that the board should give serious consideration to
erecting some kind of protective.barrier as soon as possible toprotect
the players and the fans who pay to see them play. '
Besides, look at all the pucks we could save.1
Respectfully yours,
Jim Tindall

L

rI

GYMNASTS FACE THIRD CHANGE:
Scoring System Altered

By BOB LEES
When gymnastics coach Newt
Loken described the method of de-
termining the Big Ten champ as
"confusing," he couldn't have.
been more correct. Three times in
the past three years the Western
Conference has changed this sys-
tem. While it may be fairer this
year than before, the statisticians
idon't have an easier time.

Ss
g l-,
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IQ -
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4: on this new cardigan
4 dIt buttons at the fro

Two years ago, the method was
simple: nothing counted except
the Big Ten meet at the end of
the season. Then last year the
conference altered the procedure
and said that standings would be
based entirely on dual meets held
during the regular season.
Hybrid System
The way they are determined
now is a combination of the two.
A squad's won-lost record in dual
meets counts for one-third of its
final standing, while its perform-
ance in the conference meet
counts two-thirds. Since there are-
eight teams participating in gym-
nastics in the Big Ten, first place
in the conference meet will be
worth 16 points, second place will
be worth 14 points, and so on. A
school's score in this meet is then
added'to its total number of dual
meet victories to determine its
final point total.
Balance of Power
Although won-lost records are
not as important this year as last,
the present standings give a good
indication, of the balance of power
in the conference. As of this past
weekend, there existed a three-way
tie for first place among Mich-
igan, MSU, and Illinois, all with
4-0 records. In a tie for fourth at
2-2 were Iowa and Wisconsin.
Minnesota trailed them with a 1-3
record, while Indiana and Ohio
State were at the bottom with no
victories and four defeats.
Coach Loken appears quite sat-
isfied with the new system as well
as Michigan's showing to date. As
long as the squad keeps winning,
everything is fine. But with three
teams tied for the lead, and with
the conference meet so important,
one loss-the wrong loss-would be
disastrous.
Sports Night Editor:
R. NEIL FEFERMAN

0

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*

Where are
The VILLAGERS
Singing Feb. 25!

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1
-o mow
c

COEDS:
"Let us style a
FL ATTFRING HAIR-DO

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