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February 13, 1966 - Image 7

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-13

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5
AlINDAY. FEBRUARY' 13, x.966

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAGE5EVEN

I T 11Tt.T:Fb F laV Vi'RTTaRY S...9r iT~l MCHGANDALYPAG SVE

Indiana

Dunks

M'

Tankers

By BOB McFARLAND
Special To The Daily
BLOOMINGTON - Michigan
and Indiana staged their own ver-
sion of the "Little Olympics" yes-
terday but the Hoosier tankers
won the most gold medals, taking
a 66-57 victory over the Wol-
verines.
Seeing action for the nation's
top two swimming teams were five
veterans of the Tokyo games,
Michigan's Bill Farley and Carl
Robie along with Indiana's Kevin
Berry, Ken Sitzberger, and. Bob
Windle.
If a written script had been f 1
lowed, the confrontation couldn't
have been any more of a thriller,
with six pool records being broken
before a frantic standing room
only crowd at Royer Pool.
The Wolverines grabbed five
firsts, four of them coming in the

first six events. Putting on a tre-
mendous finish the Hoosiers cop-
ped six of the last seven to over-9
come what had been a 33-24 Mich-4
igan lead.'
No Punks
"We didn't punk out," Wolver-
ine Coach Gus Stager reflected
as a happy crowd filtered out of
the pool. "We had it won all the
way through.
"If anything lost that meet for
us it was the 100- and 200-yard
freestyles," Stager continued. In-
diana's Bill Utley sprinted to Vic-
tory in both contests, with Scott
Cordin adding a third place point
in the shorter event.
Stager thought Michigan had
the meet in hand, and Hoosier
Coach Jim Counsilman was not
one to dissent. "I never thought
we'd win that one," Counsilman
said. "Now you know why I look
like I'm 65," he grinned after a long
sigh.

It appeared that Swimming' excellent 10:12.9, Farley snapped
Magazine had not been mistaken the varsity and pool records.
in tabbing the Wolverines number After Utley's victory in the 200-
one in the country after the first yard freestyle, Michigan bounced
six events. The Michigan foursome back, Groft taking first and Ken
of Rees Orland, Paul Scheerer, Wiebeck second in the 50-yard
Robie, and Bill Groft smashed the freestyle.
pool mark in the 400-yard medley Robie followed in the 400-yard
relay with a 3:33.3 clocking, individual medley with a key tri-
Bruce Brown and Fred Brown umph over Ken Webb, the pool
took a second and third in the mark falling in the process. At the
next event, the one-meter diving, end of the first three legs, Robie
which was won by Olympian Sitz- found himself trailing both Webb
berger who earned an impressive and Hoosier Chuck Richards, but
320.80. the freestyle anchor was all Robie
Farley dualed Windle in the as he nipped Webb at the finish.
1000-yard freestyle, swimming's The score at this }point read
mile run. Windle was not eligible Michigan 33, Indiana 24. With
in the earlier meet, but the Hoosier things looking bright for the Wol-
sophomore, who won a gold medal verines the storm front began
for Australia in the 1500-meters, rolling in.
didn't make his presence felt until Almost Hung
later in the meet. Tiring early, As Counsilman termed it, "We
Windle couldn't keep up with the were on the ropes after the 50 and
Wolverine star and trailed by over I-M. If we could have just squeez-
25 yards at the finish. With an i
edA JinJ ,.nA thos tw We,., cold'

style, a first in the

200-yard

l
i
ti

breaststroke, and a victory in the
freestyle relay.
They only got the freestyle re-
lay.
New Look
Windle finally unveiled his
speed and stamina which brought
him success in the distance race.
Robie lead the entire way in the
500, but Windle edged him in a
furious finish. A relieved Counsil-
man congratulated his sophomore
The Little Olympics
400-YD. MEDLEY RELAY - 1.
Michigan (Orland, Scheerer, Robie,
Groft); 2. Indiana. Time - 3:33.3
(pool record).
ONE-METER DIVING -- 1. Stitz-
berger (1); 2. R. Brown (M); 3.
F. Brown (M). Points-320.80.
1000-YD. FREESTYLE-1. Farley
(M); 2. Windle (I); 3. Wilson (I).
Time-10:12.9 (varsity, pool record).
200-YD. FREESTYLE -- 1. Utley
(1); 2. Salassa (M); 3. Cordin (I).
Time--1:45.8.
50-YD. FREESTYLE -- . Groft
(M); 2. Wiebeck (M); 3. Williamson
(1). Time-:21.9.
400-YD. INDIVIDUAL MEDLEY-..
Robie (M); 2. Webb (1); 3. Rich-
ards (I). Time-4:18.2 (pool record.)
THREE-METER DIVING-i. Stitz-
berger (I); 2. Earley (I); 3. F.
Brown (M). Points--322.35.
200-YD. BUTTERFLY - 1. Berry
(1); 2. Collins (1); 3 O'Malley (M).
Time-i1:58.1.
i00-YD. FREESTYLE -- 1. Utley
(I); 2. Hoag (M); 3. Groft (M). Time
-:47.4.
200-YD. BACKSTROKE-1. Ham-
mer (I); 2. Kingery (M); 3. Kendrick
(I). Time-1:59.1.
500-YD. FREESTYLE-1. Windle
(I); 2. Robie (M); 3. Farley (M).
Time-4 :54.6 (pool record).
200-YD. BREASTSTROKE - 1.
Smith (I); 2. Scheerer (M); 3. Tre-
theway (I). Time-2:13.9.
400-YD. FREESTYLE RELAY - 1.
Michigan (Salassa, Wiebeck, Walls,
Hoag); 2. Indiana. Time -- 3:10.9
(pool record).

saying, "You saved us." Both
swimmers were timed in identical
4:54.6, a new pool record, but
Windle was judged the winner.
The best Scheerer could man-
age in the breaststroke was a sec-
ond, while the Michigan freestyle
unit, with the meet out of reach,
reeled off a 3:10.9 showing to
eliminate another Royer Pool rec-
ord from the books.
The two schools, which special-
ize in breaking each other's win-
ning streaks (Michigan had a 15-
meet string going), will get their
final chance for revenge at the
Big Tens.
If yesterday was any iidication,
it should be some meet.
Speaks Hear
Monday

LEAD RECORD ASSAULT:
Russell, Dill Pickle Wisconsin

(Continued from Page 1)'
stability of such fact-mongers,
who have been kind enough to
inform the world that Wisconsin's
102 points broke the "Yost Field
House record for the most points
by a losing 'Big Ten team" (of
course, more noteworthy barriers
fell, among them the most points
by a Michigan team, breaking the
Dec. 31, 1963, mark of 117 against
Detroit), Also falling was the
mark for combined points by both
teams.
Shooting a team mark of 53.3
per cent from the floor, Michi-
gan's hot-handed quintet started
off early ,after snatching a 10-7
lead with three minutes gone in
the opening period. From there,
they connected on 12 of their
first 16 shots, culminating in a
34-18 lead with the stanza not yet
half over.
Time After Time
Time and again the hustling

Michiganders nabbed errant Wis-
consin passes, reaching such fre-
quency that Russell, Dill, and Den-
nis Bankey popped three separ-
ate goals in a time span of 20
seconds. With three second-liners
in at the end of the half, Michi-
-gan led by the score of 61-44,
conceivably, a possible score for a
full game.
With the opening five in at the
start of the second half, the fire-
works continued.
Big Jim Myers- opened it with
a short jumper after only four
seconds elapsed, and it started all
over again.
Michigan now has a one game
lead in the Big Ten race as a re-
sult of Michigan State's 81-71 loss
to Minnesota last night.
Thus, with Craig Dill's game
healthy and Cazzie Russell's dis-
position happy, the once-beaten
Wolverines seem to be in a good
A Real Dill-y

position to maintain their current
Big Ten lead, necessary for the
all-important trip to the NCAA re-
gionals in Iowa City next month.
But the cheered Strack is still not
the optimistic Strack. In regard
to the present makeup of the con-
ference standings, he fatalistically
remarked that "I can only pre-
dict that the Big Ten race will
be unpredictable."
And he liked the sound of the
phrase, too.

seem to keep ourselves together."
Sitzberger and Rick Earley
commenced the comeback, as each
totaled over 300 points, in the
three-meter dive, and finished
one-two.
The Michigan butterfly ace,
Robie, was not entered in the 200-
yard version of his specialty which
came up next. "We wanted three
good races out of Carl," Stager
explained, "and we needed him in
the 400-yard medley relay." Wol-
verine Tom O'Malley, the only
Michigan entry in the fly, placed
third behind the Hoosiers.
Indiana won the backstroke and
100-free in quick succession. To.
down the Hoosiers at this point,
the Wolverines had to have a one-
two finish in the 500-yard free-

'~#Oit
(By the author of "Raty Round the Flag, Boy',
"Dobe Gillis," etc.)
ROOMMATES: THEIR CAUSE AND CURE
You'd think that with all the progress we have made in
the education game, somebody would have found a cure
for roommates by now. But no. Roommates remain as big
a problem today as they were when Ethan Mather founded
the first American college.
(Contrary to popular belief, Harvard was not the first.
Mr. Mather started his institution some 100 years earlier.
And quite an institution it was, let me tell you! Mr. Mather
built schools of liberal arts, fine arts, dentistry and tan-
ning. He built a lacrosse stadium that seated 200,000.
Everywhere on campus was emblazoned the stirring Latin
motto CAVE MUSSI-"Watch out for moose." The stu-
dent union contained a bowling alley, a weighing ma-
chine, and a sixteen-chair barber shop.)
(It was this last feature-the barber shop-that, alas,
brought Mr. Mather's college to an early end. The student
body, being drawn chiefly from the nearby countryside,
was composed almost entirely of Pequot and Iroquois In-
dians who, alas, had no need of a barber shop. They
braided the hair on top of their heads, and as for the hair on
their faces, they had none. The barber, Tremblatt Follicle
by name, grew so depressed staring day after day at 16 emp-
ty chairs that one day his mind gave way. Seizing his vibra-
tor, he ran outside and shook the entire campus till it crum-
bled to dust. This later became known as Pickett's Charge.)
But I digress. We were exploring ways for you and your
roommate to stop hating each other..This is admittedly
difficult but not impossible if you will both bend a bit,
give a little.
I remember, for example, my own college days (Berlitz
'08). My roommate was, I think you will allow, even less
agreeable than most. He was a Tibetan named Ringading
whose native customs, while indisputably colorful, were
not entirely endearing. Mark you, I didn't mind so much
the gong he struck on the hour or the string of firecrack-
ers he set off on the half hour. I didn't even mind that he
singed chicken feathers every dusk and daybreak. What I
did mind was that he singed them in my hat.
To be fair, he was not totally taken with some of my
habits either-especially my hobby of collecting water. I
had no jars at the time, so I just had to stack the water
any-old-where.
Well, sir, things grew steadily cooler between Ringa-
ding and me, and they might actually have gotten ugly
had we not each happened to receive a package from home
one day. Ringading opened his package, paused, smiled
shyly at me, and offered me a gift.
"Thank you," I said. "What is it?"
"Yak butter," he said. "You put it in your hair. In Ti-
betan we call it gree see kidstu i."
"Well now,that's mighty friendly,"I said andoffered him
a gift from my package."Now you must have one of mine."
"Thank you," he said. "What is this called?"
"Personna Stainless Steel Razor Blades," I said.
"I will try one at once," he said. And did.
"Wowdow !" he cried. "Never have I had such a smooth,'
close, comfortable shave !"
"Ah, but the best is yet!" I cried. "For you will get
many, many smooth, close, comfortable shaves from your
Personna Blade-each one nearly as smooth, close, and
comfortable as the first!"
"Wowdow!" he cried.
"Moreover," I cried, "Personna Blades come both in'
Double Edge style and Injector style!"
"Sort of makes a man feel humble," he said.
"Yes," I said.
We were both silent then, not trusting ourselves to'
speak. Silently we clasped hands, friends at last, and I am
proud to say that Ringading and I remain friends to this
day. We exchange cards each Christmas and firecrackers
each Fourth of July.
* * * 0 19K, Max Suba
The makers of Personna® Stainless Steel Blades who sponsor
this column-sometimes nervously-are also the makers of
Burma Shave.® Burma Shave soaks rings around any other
lather and is available in regular or menthol. Be krid to your
kisser; try some soon.
JOIN THE DAILY
SPORTS STAFF

I I

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"w11

I

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II

Big Ten Standings

I

W L Pet.
MICHIGAN 7 1 .875
Michigan State 6 2 .750
Minnesota 5 2 .714
Illinois 5 3 .625
Iowa 3 4 .429
Ohio State 3 4 .429
Northwestern 3 5 .375
Indiana 2 5 .286
Purdue 2 6 .250
Wisconsin 2 6 .250
Yesterday's Results
Minnesota 81, Michigan State 71
Indiana 81, Illinois 77
Ohio State 68, Purdue 54
Northwestern 81, Iowa 73
Monday's Games
Ohio State at Indiana
Minnesota at Iowa

Darden f
Clawson f
Myers c
Russell g
Thompsong
Dill
Bankey
Brown
Pitts
Tillotson
Totals
Franklin f
Gustafson f
Barnes c
Sweeney g
Carlin g
Zubor
Morenz
Roberts
Johnson
Gardner
Totals

MICHIGAN
G, F R P T
6-12 4-5 10 4 16
6-8 2-2 5 2 14
6-12 2-2 8 1 14
14-30 8-9 6 2 36
9 4-6 1-1 1 2 9
7-12 4-6 9 3 18
3-3 0-0 2 3 6
1-4 0-0 2 1 2
1-3 1-2 2 2 3
1-2 0-0 1 0 2
49-92 22-57 50 20 120
WISCONSIN
G F R PT
2-8 0-0 7 3 4

proudly announces the
opening o petitionin for the
General Co-Chairmen of
HOMECOMING '66
SOPH SHOW '66
*Petitions mab be picked up in the League
Undergraduate Office or Union Student Offices.

John Scott
News Analyst-Author,
Assistant to Publisher
of Time Magazine
Just returned from
Assignment to USSR,
Outer Mongolia,
Eastern Europe and
will report on
"The New Diversity in
the Communist World"
in
Rackham Amphitheatfre
Monday, February 14
3 P.M.

4

f

6-12 3-3 6 1 15
8-18 8-8 9 3 24
7-9 0-0 3 3 14
3-6 5-8 3 3 11
4-7 0-0 4 2 8
3-9 4-4 0 2 10
4-7 6-7 2 1 14
1-i 0-0 0 0 2
0-0 0-0 0 0 0
38-77 26-30 41 18 102

L

t

Largest
cho ie 01 living units
.UflIVERSIIY TOWERS
" Now Tenting f or Aug.
IJ - -.-. . . . .-IIVFRITY AVE. &' FOREST AVE. PHOCNE: 761 -3565

F

WATCH for the
. GRAND OPENING 0
of the
NEWEST and FINEST.
S CHINESE-AMERICAN
RESTAURANT
OPENING SOON IN
31 IS. MAIN ST.-ANN ARBOR
I CGmCt.?Cl Ct 'E , ' )orSCot.' ) t) U<" .CCSG

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. . . . . . *..... :-t" ,.. .,... ... ,.... ..,.. .'.'t.:,.. ,.^ ' f:"5"' ." - \i;.-" } {; ,"¢ S ":.';" A
.: . .: {. ., F .:, : "::.": ": ".": . , } .,? .t. ". ":. : .}. ;....,.t{... . .;" .... . tx.,.: r...,: . :..t".i >.', .:..f.zi.. .i .-."at.. ; .....: .si:{:}: b :,{ ::s "x. i. . .. ,..:.Z.:"fw . :,'tx.w..x.. "..r'i>t. . . . . . . ..f}?a": ".o: .
GET YOUR NEW CARD FOR '66
9 Fill out application below. Bring it to our store and receive
your discount card absolutely free, entitling you to 10% DIS-
COUNT for the rest of the year.
FREE 10%" DISCOUNT CARD rz
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Public Invited

Sponsored by Deportment
of Political Science and
Journalism and Center for
Russian Studies

'

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fin fen alion at
Jahn P l
Splendor, Color the World Over!

r7

T2nT!T!n"

For

your.

convenience,

. See Men's and Women's Costumes
from Latin America, Africa, Asia
9 Meet non-American students
informally after show
* Feast on refreshments
Accent on the International

the study

Space in

the

Michigan League has.

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