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February 12, 1966 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

'PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'PAGE SIX THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Puckmen Fall

to Gophers,

54

GRUDGE MATCH:
Swimmers Invade
Indiana Stronghold

By BILL LEVIS
The Minnesota Gophers, after
suffering two consecutive setbacks
at the hands of the Wolverines in
Minneapolis, came roaring back
last night and stunned Michigan
with a 5-4 hockey defeat.
The Wolverines were in the
game until the last three minutes
of play when Bruce Larson stole
a pass from Dennis Zacho and
Frank Zyweic and shot it past
Michigan goal tender Harold Her-
man.
Earlier in the period, the 'M'
icers had knotted the score at four
apiece when Barry IacDonald
tipped the puck in after Bruce
Koviak had fired it from the left.
side just short of the blue line.
Minnesota drew first blood when
with 1:39 gone in the first period,'
Mike Crupi dribbled the puck

down the right side and passed it
to mate Jack Dale. Dale shot the<
puck on Herman. When the goalie
made the save but could not con-'
trol the puck, Rob Shattuck tippedI
in the rebound.
The Wolverines were not taken
easily though. When the oppor-
tunity for a score came at 2:47 as'
Norby of Minneosta went off for
interference, the Blue took full
advantage. Their power play, led
by Mel Wakabayashi, struck at
4:31. Koviak took a drop pass from
Mel, and fired it from 25 feet out,
tying the score at one up.
The Wolverines ended the scor-
ing in the period with a minute
to go when again on a. power play,
MacDonald passed the puck to
Wakabayashi who shot it from the
left side. Ron Ullyot took the re-
bound off Minnesota's goalie John
Lothrop and fired it in.

Commenting after the game was
a happy John Maruicci, Minne-
sota's coach. "It's always spirited
when these two teams get to-
gether. There is such a great
rivalry." This spirited play was
seen in the number of penalties
for both teams. In the first period
alone, the two squads gathered
nine penalties.
Maruicci felt that the referee
had very good control of the game.
First Period Scoring: MIinn-Shat-
tuck (Dale, Crupi) 1:39. M-Koviak
(Wakabayashi) 4:31. M-Uilyot (Wa-
kabayashi, MacDonald) 18:37. Penal-
ties: Minn-Norby (interference)
2:47. M - Lee Marttila (holding)
4:48. Minn-Hughes (tripping) 5:57.
M-MacDonald (charging) 10:23. M-
Ferguson (elbowing) 12:55. Minn-
Branch (high-sticking) 16:49 ,.--
Lee Marttila (high-sticking) 16:49.
Minn-Norby (hooking) 17:05.
Second Period Scoring: M--Fer-
guson (MacDonald, Wakabayashi)
0:43. Minn-Grosso (Norby, Gam-

He added that, "It was a well of-
ficiated game. The players real-
ized in the end that the game was
the most important factor." In
the last period not a penalty was
called.
The Wolverines scored first in
the period with 43 seconds gone,
as MacDonald passed from back
of the Minnesota net to Captain
Wakabayashi. 'Waka' shot on net
with Lothrop saving. Bob Fergu-
bucci) 7:54. Minn-Larson (Woog)
8:46. Minn-Zacho (Larson, Woog)
8:53. Penalties: M--Schiller (trip-
ping) 3:01. M-Baird (cross check-
ing) 3:12. M-Lee Marttila (hook-
ing) 9:21. Minn-Branch (holding)
9:37. Minn - Shattuck (tripping)
14:13.
Third Period scoring: M - Mac-
Donald (Koviak) 12:47. Minn -
Larson (Zacho, Zywiec) 16:57.

naves:
Lathrop (Minn)
Herman (M)

5 17 16-38
10 3 7-20

Vetzner Chosen to Head Sports Staff

son then took the rebound and
slid it in from right in front of the
net.
Goalie vs. Goalie
Maruicci commented, "B o t h
goalies did a really good job. It
was a battle between the goalies."
He noted that both teams made
many mechanical errors. "There
was bad coverage in front of each
net. Both teams scored two goals
which were the result of poor de-
fensive work."
Minnesota had its best chances
of the night in the second period,
when Michigan had two men in
the penalty box. Tom Schiller
went off for tripping and 11 sec-
onds later Bob Baird went off for
cross-checking. Shorthanded by
two men, the Wolverines put up a
herculean effort and prevented the
Golden Gophers from scoring.
Still the Gophers were destined
to score, and score they did. Min-
nesota came back with three goals
in a matter of 59 seconds with 8
minutes gone. Chuck Norby fed a
pass to Lorne Grosso who scored
on Herman from up close.
Faceoff Score
With the score at 3-2 in favor
still of Michigan, the Gophers had
momentum going for them. 52 sec-
onds later, Larson slapped one in
which Herman appeared not even
to see. The Gophers were not
through though. Right off the
faceoff Doug Woog tipped it to
Larson, Larson gave to Zacho who
put the Gophers in front 4-3.
After the game, a dejected
hockey coach, Al Renfrew, ex-
plained the difference in the two
teams as just, "they put the puck
in more times than we did." Like
Maruicci, he felt that both goalies
played well.
This was the 162nd game play-
ed in the Michigan-Minnesota
rivalry. It left Michigan still in
fourth place in the WCHA with
a 7-6 record while the Gophers,
on the rise the last several weeks,
increased their victory total to ten
for the season.

By JIM LaSOVAGE
Collegiate swimming g i a n t s
Michigan and Indiana clash this
afternoon in Bloomington for the
second time this season in a
grudge match for the Hoosiers.
The Hoosiers, who have never
lost in their home Royer Pool, will
try to avenge the 62-61 de-
feat handed them by Michigan a
month ago in Ann Arbor. It was
also Michigan which ended a 47-
meet win streak of the Hoosiers
a year ago today.
Indiana has strengthened itself
since the meet last January with
the addition to the squad of Bob
Windle, the Australian 1500-me-
ter Olympic champion who became
eligible at the start of the second
semester last Monday.
With Windle, Indiana Coach
Jim (Doc) Counsilman feels that
his lineup will be more flexible.
Ken Webb will be able to con-
centrate more on the individual
medley, and Bill Utley, who swims
every stroke, will be used to a
better advantage.
As Michigan, the Hoosiers are
tapering off for a meet for the
first time this season. Counsilman
kept his biggest guns on the
bench in last week's meet against
Purdue. "We've been pointing for
this meet," the coach says, "and
I think we'll be ready. Then we'll
shoot for another peak at the Big
Ten meet."
But the Wolverines will be ready
SCORES
COLLEGE BASKETBALL
St. Joseph's 111, Georgetown 73
John Carroll 89, Eastern Michigan 86
Princeton 79, Brown 67
Richmond 84, West Virginia 82
Penn 62, Yale 58 .
Southern Methodist 99, Rice 79
Columbia 85, Dartmouth 60
Rhode Island 88, Massachusetts 64
NBA
New York 122, Detroit 107
Boston 99, San Francisco 96
Philadelphia 113, Cincinnati 94

too. Coach Gus Stager plans to
go with about the same lineup
which beat the Hoosiers in Matt
Mann Pool last month. He hinted
about a new strategy, but his only
comment was "I let the boys tell!
me what they think about Indi-
ana." The swimmers often can tell,
by observing how a race goes, just
how they will have to swim to
beat them.
As breaststroker Paul Scheerer
puts it, "It's not a question of
what if we lose this or that event.
We've simply got to win."

And with this
tankers invade the
ous waters they've
son.

"It'll' take four of 'em to even
come close to approaching the ego
size of Just Tom and me."
Modest Lloyd Graff stuck in his
parting shots, then retired grace-
fully along with fellow senior
Sports Editor Tom Weinberg to
the oblivion of scrapbooks and
steam tunnels.
Juniors Chuck Vetzner, Jim Tin-
dall, Jim LaSovage and Gil Sam-
berg gained official control of the
seven sports staff typewriters last
night, and future exulted trivia is
their fault.
Vetzner, in' his fifth+ semester
of Daily sportswriting, replaces
Weinberg as sports editor. An Eng-
lish major from Skokie, Ill., Chuck,
has written extensively in nearly
all areas of Michigan sports, spe-
cializing in football and basketball.
Tindall and LaSovage each re-
ceived an associate sports editor
position. Tindall', hockey editor, is
from Arlington Heights, Ill., where
he was sports editor of the year-
book, at Arlington High. Tindall
writes from experience, having
played four years of tennis in high
school, one on a state champion-
ship team.
LaSovage, the only l4ome grown
product among the four, is from
Detroit and has served as swim-
ming beat head for two years in a
row. He is also an English major
and plans a career in law.
Samberg, last of the neophyte
beaurucrats, occupies an assistant
sports editor's desk from whence
he hopes to turn out his exciting
column. He is a New Yorker and
has specialized in basketball cov-
erage.
Vetzner spoke for, the new edi-
tors. "Taking nothing away from
Lloyd's and Tom's egos, we plan
to make this year's sports staff the
best ever.
"Traditionally The ;Daily has
tired to give the best possible cov-
erage to Michigan sports. We.hope
not only to continue this policy,
but also to humanize sports for
the casual fan and provide in
depth reporting for the true sports
buff."

attitude, the
most danger-
seen all sea-

One change in the lineup from
the last meet is the placement of
Tom O'Malley in the butterfly
leg of the 400-yard medley relay.
Ken Wiebeck, who .swam butter-
fly last month ,will swim the
freestyle anchor ,in place of Cap-
tain Rich Walls.
Wiebeck will also be entered
in the 50-yard freestyle instead of
Tom Schwarten.
Currently Michigan is rated as
the number one swimming power
in' the nation, with the Hoosiers
right behind. Swimmers from both
teams dominate the list of this
year's fastest times. But all the
Big Ten marbles are won at the
conference meet--dual meets are
merely a warmup. Today's meet
will give a hint of what is to come.
TV R EN TALS
LOWEST RATES
STUDENT SPECIALS
H I F1 STUDIO
1319 S. Univ. NO 3-7242

JIM LaSOVAGE JIM TINDALL GIL SAMBERG

r-^ _ _

WVORSHIP

CHUCK VETZNER: SPORTS EDITOR

VENGEANCE IN YOST:
Badgers Aim for 73lue' Blood

FIRST METHODIST CHURCH &
WESLEY FOUNDATION
At State and Huron Streets
Phone NO 2-4536
Hoover Rupert, Minister
Eugene Ransom, Campus Minister
SUNDAY
9:00 and 11:15 a.m.-Worship Services, Dr.
Rupert: "When We Need a Foothold in
the World of the Unseen."
10:15 a.m.-Christian Social Concerns Class,
Pine Room. "Integrated Housing in Ann
Arbor," Rev. H. L. Pickerill.
6:00 p.m.-Supper, Pine Room. Open to all.
Cost 35c.
6:30 p.m.-Program. Meet in Wesley Lounge
to go to Presbyterian Church. "U.S. and
Cina Since 1945," Dr. Albert Feuerwerker,
Director of Center for Chinese Students.
MONDAY
12:00-1 :00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "Toward a Secular Theology," lead-
er Charles Bearden. Lunch 25c.
TUESDAY
5:00 p.m.-Church Related Vocations Group,
Green Room. Supper and program.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel, fol-
lowed by breakfast in Pine Room. Out in
time for 8:00 a.m. classes.
5:10 p.m.-Holy Communion, Chapel.
6:00 p.m.-Wesley Grads, Pine Room. Sup-
per and program, "Methodist Professor
Series" with Dr. Lawrence Van Vlack.
THURSDAY
12:00-1 :00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "Methodism: Its History, Beliefs
and Movements," leader Jean Bissell.
Lunch 25c.j
FRIDAY
12:00-1:00 p.m. - Discussion Class, Pine
Room. "Christian Dating, Courtship and
Marriage," leader Gene Ransom. Lunch 25c.

By CHUCK VETZNER'
Take one look at the Wisco'n-
sin roster and you'd stamp them
fragile, not ferocious.
Take a look at their 2-5 record
in the Big Ten and just call them
lousy.
But despite a lack of height
and a shortage of victories, the
Badgers can be tough.
Michigan found out and almost
did it the hard way when they
tiptoed past Wisconsin 69-67 last
month.
Lust on the Court
The Wolverines get a chance to
be m~ore lusty about it today when
Don James"
Named New
'M A ssistant
Don James, a 33-year-old assist-
ant coach from Florida State Uni-
versity was officially appointed to
the post of assistant coach last
night by the Board in Control of
Intercollegiate Athletics.
James is expected to meet with
head coach Bump Elliott next week
and to begin his work recruiting
for Michigan immediately.
With the retirement of two foot-
ball coaches, Bob Hollway and
Don Dufek, the Board still has an-
other appointment to make for
the football staff.
James is part of a famous foot-
ball family from Massilon, Ohio.
Following his graduation from
Massilon. he moved -on to the Uni-

the two squads square off at 1:30
p.m. in Yost Field House. The
game will be televised on Channel
2.
"Physically, they're not a good-
looking team," concedes Michigan
assistant coach Jim Skala. But
basketball games aren't decided
like beauty contests, and Skala is
the first to anticipate a struggle.
"They play a tough game and
more than make up for their lack
of size," he notes.
Anyone Can Do It
It doesn't take an expert to fig-
ure this out since in the first
meeting the Badgers out rebound-
ed and, at, times, out hustled the
Wolverines.
A perfect example was late in
the first half when Michigan stood
11 proud points ahead. Wisconsin
had the ball, took a shot and miss-
ed. Then they got the rebound
and blew it again. Being -persist-
ent, the Badgers again grabbed,
the rebound and botched another
shot. Still determined, they got
the ball again, stuffed it through,
and drew a foul in the process.
They made the free throw.
Then Michigan took the ball,
missed a shot and Wisconsin took

over and scored. The two teams
repeated the process and there
stood meek little Wisconsin only
four points away.
Sveltish Rebounder
Leading that little episode was
Joe Franklin, a sophomore for-
ward who goes by the monicker
of "Jumpin'," and is built like a
Jump rope. End to end he stretch-
es 6'41". All that space, though,
takes up only 160 pounds. To be
polite you can call him svelte.
In the first Michigan game,
Jumpin' Joe grabbed 13 rebounds
and an equal number of points.
Recently the point production has
been going up, but the rebounding
has been alarmingly consistent.
The Michigan coaches plan no
change in strategy for the match.
"They almost beat us because we
were too slow and inconsistent,"
explains Skala. "We're working on
execution, and we hope to sus-
tain ourselves better."
What Skala didn't mention was
that in the second half the na-
tion's third leading scorer, one
Cazzie Russell, hit one shot out
of 12. That sort of stuff can't be
coached away. But chances are,
it won't happen again.

UNIVERSITY LUTHERAN CHAPEL
1511 Washtenaw Ave.
(The Lutheran Church-Missouri Synod)
Alfred T. Scheips, Pastor
Theodore L. Scheidt, Asst. Pastor
Sunday at 9:45 and 11:15 a.m.-Services,
"Liturgy That Is Meaningful."
Sunday at 6:00 p.m.-Gamma Delta, Lutheran
Student Organization, Supper and Pro-
gram. Panel Discussion of "Christian Med-
ical Ethics," with Prof. Vernon Dodson of
the Medical School and two medical stu-
dents and two nurses.
Wednesday at 10:00 p.m.-Midweek Devotion.
ST. MARY'S STUDENT CHAPEL
331 Thompson
NO 3-0557
Msgr. Bradley, Rev. Litka, Rev. Ennen
SUNDAY-Masses at 7:00, 8:00, 9:15, 10:45,
12:00, 12:30.
MONDAY-SATURDAY - Mosses at 7:00,
8:00, 9:00, 11:30 a.m. and 12:00 and
5:00 p.m. Confessions following mosses.
WEDNESDAY-7:30 p.m. - Evening Mass.
Confessions following.
SATURDAY-Confessions-3:30-5:00; 7:30-
9:00 p.m.
HURON HILLS BAPTIST CHURCH
Presently meeting at the YM-YWCA
Affiliated with the Baptist General
Conference
Rev. Martin Christiansen
SUNDAY SERVICES
9:45 a.m.-Sunday Bible School
1 1:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Gospel Hour.
An active University group meets each Sunday
for the 9:45 service.
Coffee is served at 9:30 a.m.
UNIVERSITY REFORMED CHURCH
1001 E. Huron at Fletcher
Pastors: Malefyt and Van Haven
9:15 a.m.-Collegiate Class.
10:30 a.m.-Worship Service. Sermon: Nico-
demus-"Progress inf Faith."
7:00 p.m.-Evening Worship. Sermon: "Re-
vivalism and Societ Reform: a Postscript,"
Prof. Timothy L. Smith, Ph.D., Prof. of
History, University of Minnesota.
8:30 p.m.-Open Forum-"Negro Identity
and the Christian Church."
BAPTIST CAMPUS CENTER
& FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
502 & 512 E. Huron 663-9376
9:45 a.m.-Campus Classes, Baptist Campus
Center.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship, First Baptist
Church.

7:30 ptm.-Bible Study.
Transportation furnished for all
NO 2-2756.

services-Call

LUTHERAN STUDENT CENTER
AND CHAPEL
National Lutheran Council
Hill St. at Forest Ave.
Henry O. Yoder, Pastor
SUNDAY
9:30 and 11:00 a.m.-Worship Services.
7:00 p.m. - "The Religious and Political
Crisis in Present India," Dr. Paul Durkee,
India.
TUESDAY, 7:15 p.m.-Course: Comparative
Religions.
WEDNESDAY, 10:00 p.m.-Vespers.
ST. ANDREW'S CHURCH and
the EPSICOPAL STUDENT
FOUNDATION
SUNDAY
8:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
9:00 a.m.-Morning Prayer (Breakfast fol-
lowing at Canterbury House),
1 1 :00 a.m.-Morning Prayer.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Prayer (Chapel).
TUESDAY
10:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
7:00 p.m.-Confirmation Class-first meet-
ing Winter Term Class at Canterbury
House.
WEDNESDAY
7:00 a.m.-Holy Communion.
FRIDAY
12:10 p.m.-Holy Communion.
DARLINGTON ,.LUTHERAN CHURCH
(Wisconsin Synod)
3545 Packard Phone 662-9247
Rev. R. A. Baer 761-1486
Sunday Worship Service-10:30 a.m.
For transportation call Rev. Baer.

THE CHURCH OF CHRIST
W. Stadium at Edgewood
Across from Ann Arbor High
Rev. V. Palmer, Minister
SUNDAY
10:00 a.m.-Bible School
11:00 a.m.-Regular Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Evening Worship.
WEDNESDAY

!.I,

GRACE BIBLE CHURCH
Corner State and Huron Sts.
Dr. Raymond H. Saxe, Pastor

NO 3-0589

No.
44
20
25
11
22
S3
23
24
33
55
54
53
12

Name
Barnes, Kenneth
Carlin, Michael
Franklin, Joseph
Gardner, Thomas
*Gustafson, Kenneth
Johnson, Robb
McCallum, James
Miller, William
*Morenz, Paul
Rebholz, James
*Roberts, David
*Schoeneck, Thomas
*Stelter, Keith
*Sweeney, Dennis

ROSTERS
WISCONSIN
Pos.
F
G
F
G
F-G
F
G
F
F
F
C
C
G

9:45 a.m.-Sunday School.
11:00 a.m.-Morning Worship.
6:00 p.m.-Training Hour.
7:00 p.m.-Evening Service.
Wednesday Prayer Meeting at 7:30 p.m.
Nursery facilities at all services.
If it's Bible you want, come to Grace Bible-
Fundamental, Pre-Millenial, Biblical.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
1501 W. Liberty St.
Ralph B. Pipe,r David Bracklein,
Fred Holtfreter, Pastors
Worship Services-8:30 and 11:00 a.m.
Holy Communion - Second Sunday of each
month.
Church School & Adult Bible Class-9:35 a.m.
Holy Baptism-First Sunday of month.
Nursery faculties during worship services and
churcf school.
FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST'
,.n,,, C~

Ht.
6-3
6-0
5-14
6-4
6-5 /
6-3
6-2
6-0
6-4 ,
6-5%
6-9
6-8
6-1

wt.
192
165
160
155
190
180
180
188
195
175
215
220
220
170

Age
21
20
20.
21
21
19
19
20
21
20
21
20
20
20

Class
Sr.
So.
So,
Sr.
Sr.
So.
So.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Sr.
Jr.
Jr.
Jr.

FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Phone 662-4466
1432 Woshtenaw Ave.
Ministers: Ernest T. Campbell, Malcolm G.
Brown, John W. Waser, Harold S. Horan
SUNDAY
Worship at 9:00, 10:30, and 12:00-12:45.
Bible Study for College Students at 10:30 a.m.
Presbyterian Campus Center located at the
Church.
FIRST UNITARIAN.CHURCH
1917 Wstenaw
Erwin A. Goede, Minister

CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH
Corner State and William
Services at 9:30 and 11:15 a.m.-"Saints in
Caesar's Household," Rev. T. N. Smith.
!^L..._L CL._t ., r - ,,'..,L ,. ..a . ."

11

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