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February 08, 1966 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1966-02-08

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PAGE SIX

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 6, 1966

PA(~I~ ~!Y THE MIChIGAN DAILY TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 8,1966

BIG TEN ROUNDUP:
Iowa, Illinois Dumped in Upsets; Badgers Squeak

_ INRA STORE
Agreeing with Bessone:
Screens at the Coliseum

By The Associated Press to overcome the Illini, 80-77.
Last night was the best night of Meanwhile, Purdue's Boilermak-
the season for the Michigan Wol- ers hit 24 of 26 free throws and
verines even though they didn't slowed down Iowa with a deliber-
play. ate offense and a zone defense to
While the Wolverines were sit- take the 66-58 decision.
ting at home, Northwestern and Mike Weaver, a 6'5" Northwest-
Purdue threw monkey wrenches in ern sophomore who has come into
the Big Ten race by drubbing Illi- his own with 58 points in the last
nois and Iowa. In the other game, two games, hit his season's high'
Indiana was nipped by Wisconsin of 30 points and led the Wildcats
79-78 in the closing seconds. to the victory.
At Champaign, the visiting The loss dropped the Illini out
Wildcats roared back from a of a shot for the lead with a 5-2
three-point halftime disadvantage Big Ten mark.
LU NCH-DISCUSSION
TUESDAY, February 8, 12:00 Noon
UM. International Center
SUBJECT:
"TRANSLATING THE LITURGY"
SPEAKER: DR. GEORGE B. HARRISON
Professor Emeritus of EnglishI

Illinois took an early 13-4 lead Purdue pulled out of the Big
and then hit tough times as North- Ten cellar and dimmed Iowa's
western went ahead 14-13. The chances as a contender, dropping
Illini, however, came back to lead the Hawkeyes to 3-3 in the Big
40-37 at halftime. Ten and 12-4 for the season.
Northwestern grabbed a hot Purdue hit 21 of 42 shots from
hand in the second half and e-I the field. The Boilermakers went
gained the lead at 5 1-44 and al-'to a deliberate game after building
though Illinois pulled into a couple up a 35-26 halftime advantage.
of ties, the Wildcats never trailed Iowa, with a 44-33 edge in re-
again. ' bounds, got 69 shots but hit only
Don Freeman, who led the Illini 24 and made only 10 of 19 free
with 25 points, closed the gap in the i throws.
final minute and lifted Illinois The Boilermakers used a zone
within two points at 75-73 but defense all the way, collapsing on
free throws byWeaver and Jim 6-7 George Peeples and barring
Burns gave Northwestern a 79-.75 him from many good shots close
lead and the ball game, in. Chris Pervall led the Hawk-
Ric~hn Joewasheld to 15 pointseyes with 14 points, and Peeples
I Rih Jnes as eldto 1 pontsadded 13.
by the Wildcats, while his oppo- * *
nent in' the center, Jim Pitts,
nmatchidhs output. Burns was Wisconsin by One
Northwestern's second high scorer In the final game of the evening,
with 17 while Walt Tiberi and Ron Wisconsin trailed by as much as
Kozlicki each got eight for the; 15 points, but surged back in the
winners. second half to clip Indiana in the
last four seconds on a 10-foot
Purdue Triumphs 66-58 jumper by sophomore M i k e

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Playing before the home crowd,
Purdue put on an accuracy dis-
play from the free throw line in
a defensive battle that saw Dave
Schellhase connect on 13 straight
charity tosses.
Schellhase, the nation's leading
college basketball scorer, connect-
ed on 8 of 15 shots from the field
for a total of 29 points. Sopho-
more Denny Brady backed him up
with 14 points, including 8 of 8
from the free throw line.
I WCHA Standings
W L T Pct.
Michigan Tech 11 3 0 .786
North Dakota 10 6 0 .685
Minnesota 9 6 0 .600
MICHIGAN 7 5 0 .583
Denver 7 6 1 .535
Michigan State 8 8 0 .500
Colorado 4 10 0 .285
Duluth 0 12 1 .038

Carlin.
The Badgers had gained the
ball after Vern Payne missed a
free throw with 26 seconds to go.
They waited until nearly the last
moment before Carlin drove into
the lane for the basket.
The victory was Wisconsin's
second in seven Big Ten basket-
ball games.
Indiana had led 38-23 late in
the first half before sophomore
Joe Franklin spurred a Badger
rally and thrust Wisconsin ahead
at 53-52 on a three-point play with
13 minutes left.
The lead changed hands eight
more times. Carlin had hit a jump-
er with 1:30 remaining for a '77-76
edge before Indiana's Harry Joy-
ner drove under for the Hoosiers'
last lead.
Franklin scored 23 points, 16 of
them in the second half before
fouling out with 3:30 left. Payne
had 21 for Indiana, butrwas limit-
ed to just one free throw in the
last 16 minutes.
Joyner had held off the Badgers
until Carlin's last-gasp basket and
finished with 15. Carlin finished
with 14. Two other Badgers were
in double figures as Mike Sweeney
and Ken Barnes each netted a
dozen.
1.

NORTHWESTERN'S JIM PITTS GOES high in the air in an
earlier game as Wildcat Mike Weaver (45) stands by. The two led
last night's attack against Illinois, Weaver accounting for 30
points and Pitts netting 15.
NATIONAL ROUNDUP:
Moutaineers Stun!
Duke; Wildcats Win

It is unlikely that there have been many moments in the past
few years when Michigan hockey fans can agree with Spartan Coach
Amo Bessone about anything, but an unfortunate incident at Satur-
day night's home game should make everyone forget differences over
personalities.
For anyone who was not among the 3500 at the game, or who
didn't hear about it from his roommate, the facts are these: At 13:40
of the third period, with Michigan down by a score of 4-2, Spartan
wingman Brian McAndrew threw a hard, head-on check into Michigan
captain Mel Wakabayashi near center ice, next to the boards. Waka-
bayashi's skates went out from under him and tripped McAndrew.
After laying on the ice for a moment next to Wakayashi the Spartan
rose to his knees, whereupon a fan from the first row grabbed Mc-
Andrew's stick and, with a cry of "You dirty . . .," he broke the stick
over McAndrew's helmet.
One State player verbally attacked the fan, who had remained
in his seat, but shortly thereafter, when the entire Spartan bench
had rushed over to attend to the apparently unconscious wing-
man, the spectator in question retreated to the fourth row. He
realized that he and his wife were in danger of grave physical
harm and fled from the rink through the exit under the press box.
Three policemen followed the pair about three minutes later
when they could finally get over to that press-box of the rink.
McAndrew was unharmed and proceeded to skate his next rota-
tion on the ice as well as the rest of the game.
In a phone interview yesterday, Bessone said, "This incident
only goes to point up the glaring need for screens in the Michigan
rink. They are the only team in the WCHA that doesn't have them,
and they really should, for the protection of both the players and
the fans."~
With regard to the players protection, Bessone related that he
had never at any time in his playing or coaching career, seen any-
thing like what happened Saturday. Michigan ticket director Don
Wier exclaimed that he had not seen the likes of the incident. seen
he was at Michigan, a stay which dates back to 1947.
Thus, although serious spectator participation is unusual
in the sport, it should be noted that had McAndrew been serious-
ly injured (which could have easily happened had his protective
helmet slipped off after the check), there would have been con-
siderably more pressure on the University to erect protective
screens, let alone the threat of a possible lawsuit for assault with
a deadly weapon. Thus the University is getting out of the whole
incident rather cheaply as far as adverse publicity goes, but this
should not allow the fact that the incident could have been much
more serious slip to the back of our minds.
The fan in question turned himself in to the police on Sunday
morning, and, although Bessone was surprised to hear this, he ex-
pressed the view that McAndrew would not press charges. However,
he said he would write a letter to Michigan athletic director Fritz
Crisler with his demands for screens.
Although attacks from fans are to be considered, it seems that
the real benefit of protective barriers accrues to the fans themselves.
It has always seemed unusual that more fans aren't hurt at
Michigan games, since the only screens are those behind the goals.
Only a lot of luck and heavy winter coats serve to protect the fans
from a quarter pound of rubber flying in their direction at 50 or 60
miles per hour. Bessone said, "I can't remember a series that we
played down there (the Coliseum) when one or two fans weren't
clunked with a puck."
The fans hardly have the protection that they deserve, as the
boards are about two and one half feet high all the way around
the rink. A pass off of the boards or a deflected puck can, and
frequently does, end up in the stands. I would estimate that be-
tween 10 and 15 pucks fly into the crowd every game, yet it is
only rarely that one sees anyone leave the rink for medical atten-
tion. Yet this too happened in the home series with Michigan
Tech 10 days ago when a woman was struck in the face with a
puck while sitting in her seat about seven rows away from the ice.
Even watching the puck closely cannot prevent some injuries, and
if a testimonial is wanted, simply ask team physician Dr. Dennis
Burke about how he got hit just under the eyebrow while standing
in the players' box at North Dakota. Sometimes one might not see
the puck coming, or even if one did, one might not be able to move
with the quickness of an athlete to block it. Either of these slips
could result in serious injury or an ugly scar.
In football circles there has always been the humorous story
about a spectator who left the stands to make a diving tackle on
an opposing player just before he crossed the goal line, but the
spectacle Saturday night was considerably different since:a young
hockey player could have been killed by an emotional fan.
There is no obvious way to prevent a recurrence of this incident
(except perhaps to publicize it and hope that it has a-sobering effect)
without the erection of some kind of protective barrier around the ice
at the Coliseum. Even if it were only chicken wire, fans and players
would be protected from each other.
-JIM TINDALL

4

jL

Big Ten Standings

11

W L Pct.
6 1 .857

MICHIGAN
Michigan State
Illinois
Minnesota
Iowa
Ohio State
Purdue
Northwestern
Wisconsin
Indiana

6
5
4
3
2
2
2
2
1

1
2
2
3
4
5
5
5
5

.857
.714
.667
.500
.333
.286
.286
.286
.167

He Finds Newspaper
Advertising HA s Fine
Career Opportunities
Talk to Robert D. Hirst of The Grand Rapids Press
and he'll tell you he made a wise choice when he
decided to enter newspaper advertising as a career.
A marketing and sociology major, Bob graduated
in 1958 from Michigan State University with his B.A.
As a member of the Booth Newspaper Training Pro-
gram, he spent his first training period in accounting
and circulation at The Bay City Times, one of nine
Booth daily papers in Michigan.r
He also did a tour in display advertising on The
Muskegon Chronicle, and in the classified and na-
tional advertising departments of the Jackson Citizen
Patriot.
With his training completed, he joined The Ann
Arbor News as a member of the local advertising
staff. He was later promoted to his current position
- Assistant Classified Advertising Manager of The
Grand Rapids Press.
If you are wondering where your business future
lies-why not consider Booth Newspapers. Ask your
Placement Officer for the date and time of Booth
Newspapers' visit to your. campus, or write: Coordi-
nator, Training Program, Booth Newspapers, Inc.,
Suite 2100, 211 West Fort Street, Detroit, Michigan
48226.
BOOTH NEWSPAPERS
THE ANN ARBOR NEWS " THE BAY CITY TIMES " THE FUNT
JOURNAL s THE GRAND RAPIDS PRESS " JACKSON CITIZEN
PATRIOT " KALAMAZOO GAZETTE " THE MUSKEGON
CHRONICLE " THE SAGINAW NEWS " THE YPSILANTI PRESS

I

SCORES

Yesterday's Results
Purdue 66, Iowa 58
Wisconsin 79, Indiana 78
Northwestern 80, Illinois 77
Saturday's Games
Wisconsin at Michigan
Indiana at Illinois
Iowa at Northwestern
Michigan State at Minnesota
Purdue at Ohio State

COLLEGE BASKETBALL
West Virginia 94, Duke 90
Kentucky 85, Florida 75
Tennessee 100, Georgia 71
North Carolina 104, South Carolina 70
Maryland 86, Wake Forest 78 (ovt)
Colorado 65, Missouri 60
Nebraska 85, Oklahoma 81
Tulsa 81, North Texas State 75
Kansas State 50, Oklahoma 44
Alabama 66, Louisiana State 62
Tennessee State 65, So. Illinois 61

CHARLESTON, W. Va. (P) -j
Johnny Lesher, a sharpshooter1
from Claymont, Del., primed Westt
Virginia's attack in the secondt
half last night as the Mountain-l
eers upset Duke's second ranked
basketball team 94-90.
The triumph was West Virgin-,
ia's 15th against five losses and1
added substance to their bid for
the Southern Conference title.
The Blue Devils started as if
they would blow the Mountaineers
of f the floor, running up a 31-12;
margin with 12 minutes remain-
ing in the first half. But sopho-
more Ron Williams and Bill Ry-
czaj ignited the WVU offensive,
and the Mountaineers pulled with-
in three points at 45-42 at inter-
mission.
Ryczaj sent WVU in front for
the first time with 10:49 remain- i

LEXINGTON, Ky. (A)-Sluggish
Kentucky, the nation's top-rank-
ed team, took an 85-75 Southeast-
ern Conference basketball victory
last night when Florida's late ral-
ly fell short.
Florida's superb board work
gave the Gators the shots, but
they were cold from the floor,
and the Wildcats won on the
strength of their shooting.
The Wildcats hit 45 per cent of
their field shots compared with
34 per cent, for Florida. Florida
won the battle of rebounds, 66-49.
Pat Riley led the Kentucky ef-
fort with 248points, backstopped
by totals of 18 and 17 from Louie
Dampier and Thad Jaracz.
Kentucky, which has played five
games in the last 10 days, was
taken to the wire as the Gators
kept on the pressure throughout

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ing with a 12-foot jumper, but the second half.
the score was tied five times and With 3:51 to go, the Wildcats
the lead swapped hands 12 times owned a 17-point lead. Then the
before Lesher's 25-footer with 2:57 Gators went on an eight-point
left to put the Mountaineers on scoring splurge on baskets by
top to stay. Harry Winkler and Mike Rolly-
The loss was Duke's second son and two free throws each by
against 15 victories and was its Winkler and Gary McElroy.
first since South Carolina spilled Winkler's free throws with 53
the Blue Devils 73-71 very early seconds remaining cut Kentucky's
in the season. lead to 81-72 and that was as
- close as the Gators could get.
Kentucky is now 18-0 overall
Iand 9-0 to lead the SEC. The
Gators are 12-8 and 5-4.I
IN STEEL

I-

"..-..

- i

4

FALL ORIENTATION
LEADER INTERVIEWS

t
i
r
}

SIGN UP
Mon.-Fri., February 7-11
1-5 P.M.
STUDENT OFFICES (2nd Floor, UNION)
former leaders need not interview
UAC

Psest

Iq

-
r-
j
r

w. 1

SPORTS NIGHT EDITOR:
DAN OKRENT

I

11

r

O"' the J#to"t

1 E
ISTEELI
Our representative
will be on campus
March 2
to interview undergraduate
and graduate candidates for
Bethlehem's 1966 Loop
Course training program.
OPPORTUNITIES are
available for men interested
in steel plant operations,
sales, research, mining, ac-
counting, and other activi-
ties.
DEGREES required are
mechanical, metallurgical,
electrical, chemical, indus-
trial, civil, mining, and
other engineering special-
ties; also chemistry, phy-
sics, mathematics, business
administration, and liberal
arts.
If you would like to discuss
your career interest with a
Bethlehem representative,
see your placement officer

to center of campus
UflVRIYTOWERS

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S. UNIVERSITY AVE. & FORESTAVE. PHONE: 761-3565

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(Near Michigan Theatre)

HILARIOUS
VALENTINES
U -

WOULD YOU LIKE TO READ
1000 to 2000 WRSA MINUTE
WITH FULL COMPREHENSION & RETENTION
EASE PRESSURE - SAVE TIME-IMPROVE CONCENTRATION
You can read 150-200 pages an hour using the ACCELERATED READING method.
You'll learn to comprehend at speeds of 1,000 to 2,000 words a minute. And retention is
excellent.
This is NOT a skimming method; you definitely read every word.
You can apply the ACCELERATED READING method to textbooks and factual mate-
rial as well as to literature and fiction. The author's style is not lost when you read at these
speeds. In fact, your accuracy and enjoyment in reading will be increased.
Consider what this new reading ability will enable you to accomplish-in your required
reading and in the additional reading you want to do.
No machines, projectors, or apparatus are used in learning the ACCELERATED READ-
ING method. Thus the reader avoids developing any dependence upon external equipment in
reading.
An afternoon class and an evening class in ACCELERATED READING will be taught
each TUESDAY adjacent to the U. ofM. campus, beginning on February 15.
Be our guest at a 30-minute public DEMONSTRATION of the ACCELERATEDREAD-
ING method, and see it applied by U. of M. students who have recently completed the course.

*i

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